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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Science - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2014 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the different types of ecological communities and describe the manners in which such communities interact with their biotic and abiotic environments; evaluate the role of human activities in generating pollution, deforestation and other such activities on their environment; analyze the manner in which humans and other living organisms are able to adapt to the environments of the various biomes that make up the Earth's biosphere; analyze the pros and cons of obtaining energy from various sources including nuclear, coal, oil, biomass, solar, etc.; and propose solutions to the problem of increased carbon (and methane) emissions causing anthropogenic global warming.

Instruction:

This self-study course is designed to cover a variety of issues related to the environment and the human impact on the ecosphere. Students examine various biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to the environment and its health and various biomes and climates that cover the Earth and the factors that distinguish them and human activities and their effects on the environment, including discussion of global climate change, deforestation, extinctions caused by human encroachment, etc.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Environmental Science or as a core science requirement, including a laboratory component (6/14) (4/19 revalidation).

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

Version 1: May 2013 - July 2018. Version 2: August 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2:  Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply the scientific method and conduct scientific inquiry and gathering of data; describe the structure of the Earth's interior and explain how different layers are identified; explain the composition of various types of rocks and minerals; outline the processes of weathering and erosion, including running water, glaciers, wind, etc.; relate plate tectonics and the dynamic earth to earthquakes, volcanoes, and the formation of mountains; interpret data relating to earthquakes such as "p" and "s" waves and Richter scale values; explain the structure and composition of the atmosphere, including its features such as temperature, air pressure, and moisture; identify the effects of air pressure, temperature, wind, and other meteorological data on weather and weather patterns; interpret the effects of air masses, moving air masses, and fronts on weather on weather disturbances such as hurricanes and tornadoes; identify characteristics of various climate types; and discuss the impact of human activity on the weather and climate on Earth, including concept of greenhouse gas emission and its effect on global climate.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This self-study course covers a variety of scientific disciplines related to the composition of Earth and its dynamic nature and position in space. Major topics include: composition of the Earth's surface and the Earth itself, including rocks and minerals and the weathering, erosion, and deposition that shape the Earth's surface, earthquakes and volcanic activity, Meteorology (weather, air masses, precipitation, fronts, etc.), climate, climate change, and impact of human activities on the Earth's climate.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Earth Science or as a core science requirement (11/13). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Earth Science or as a core science requirement (8/18 revalidation). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self study; self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: perform mathematical functions and conduct measurements and calculations necessary for the study and use of chemistry, including problem-solving and the usage of appropriate units; identify the distinctions between matter and energy and the relationship between them; distinguish between elements, compounds and mixtures (heterogeneous and homogeneous) and describe the relationships between them; utilize the periodic table and the various pieces of information available thereon; describe the components of an atomic nucleus and relate those concepts to radioactivity and nuclear energy; balance chemical equations between various reactants; identify the special properties of various solids, liquids, gasses and solutions; determine the effects of various factors such as heat, moisture and other factors on chemical reactions and the rates at which they occur; distinguish between acids and bases and identify their varying roles in nature and in industry; and describe various types of organic compounds and identify their roles in life on Earth. 

Instruction:

Introduction to Chemistry covers a variety of subjects related to the study of matter. The course deals with the impact of chemistry on daily lives and focuses on the relationship of matter and energy and the structure of subatomic particles, atoms and molecules (the building blocks of matter). Topics include: compounds, bonds and chemical reactions and the characteristics of various types of molecules, such as acids, bases and organic compounds. Because it is anticipated that most Coopersmith students taking this course are doing so as part of preparation for a career in a healthcare-related field, the course has been designed to focus on knowledge and skills necessary for those entering health-related careers. The course uses a self-study format and asks students to prepare for the proficiency exam by completing a course of study that includes reading assignments and video assignments as presented in the course syllabus.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in general science or chemistry (11/15).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

Version 1: May 2014 -  July 2018. Version 2: August 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the roles of the major types of biological molecules in forming living organisms and carrying out life processes; apply the roles of each of the parts of a cell to the life processes that they carry out; analyze the manner in which substances that help determine genetic inheritance, including chromosomes, DNA, nucleotides, etc., impact the genetic characteristics of offspring; apply the various life processes carried out by human organs and organ systems to the over-all goal of maintaining homeostasis in human beings; and evaluate the impacts that various interferences with homeostasis may have on the functioning of the human body and identify the steps that the human body takes to deal with such interference.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This self-study course explores the study of the life processes of all organisms and the life processes of human beings. It begins with some necessary background information about molecular and cellular structure and then moves into life processes, including nutrition, respiration, circulation, excretion and regulation and the maintenance of homeostasis, specifically in human beings.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or as a core science requirement (5/14). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or as a core science requirement (8/18 revalidation). 

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study;self-paced).

Dates:

Version 1: May 2013 - July 2018. Version 2: August 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2:  Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define various classes of nutrients and discuss the importance of each to human health, focusing on the relationship of water and fluids to electrolyte balance; identify components of a healthy diet, including guidelines based on the USDA food pyramid; discuss different forms of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins important in diets and the best sources for these nutrients and recommended daily allowances for each; identify nutrients necessary for the body to produce its own secretions and other materials necessary for homeostasis; describe the risks for food-borne pathogens and discuss potential methods to reduce risks posed by these pathogens; compare and contrast nutritional needs for adult males, adult females, children, pregnant women, etc.; outline various vitamins and minerals and foods necessary to promote bone health, effects of antioxidants, and energy metabolism; describe the digestive process as it relates to energy metabolism and explain the more common digestive disorders; and outline causes of various nutritional disorders, including obesity, diabetes (Types I and II), malnutrition, etc. and their long-term consequences and treatment options.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This self-study of the human diet contains substantial elements of biology and chemistry as they relate to course topics. Major topics include: six classes of nutrients (organic and inorganic) and their importance to a well-balanced diet, sources of important nutrients and the value of obtaining these nutrients from certain foods, impact of physical activity as it relates to nutrition and health, nutrition-related diseases and disorders, categories of people (children and pregnant women) and their need for special diets. An as additional requirement to textbook readings and study guide; students participate in the MyNutrition Lab with diet analysis for a period of two weeks and turn in the report generated by the system.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nutrition or as a core science requirement (6/13). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nutrition or a core science requirement (8/18 revalidation).

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