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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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History and Political Science - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
September 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe political systems and states; detail the process of fostering economic development; discuss why political systems are compared; pinpoint the structures and functions of political systems; explicate why and how culture matters to political processes; identify trends that shape contemporary political cultures; explain how citizens participate in sociopolitical affairs in different societies; discuss the development of interest groups and describe their historical performances; define authoritarian party systems and their power structures; assess the prospects and challenges facing democracies and authoritarianism; trace the geographic distribution of government power;explain the process of community building; and present the common outcomes of international interactions and their generalities.

Instruction:

This self-study course is designed to provide students with a broad survey of the important issues in the study of comparative politics. Students will gain an understanding of world politics and political systems and compare issues and structures on a global level. Students conduct in-depth studies of individual countries focusing on theoretical frameworks to explore broad issues such as why some countries modernize more quickly and why some are more democratic and understand how local issues have a worldwide impact. Students also explore how politics works on individual, group, national, and global levels. Throughout the course, students study political institutions and processes and learn to use critical thinking skills regarding the consequences of public policies. Students observe the international economy and how politics shape a nation's influence on the local and global levels. Additionally, students learn about other countries, regions, and the world while asking fundamental questions about politics and government.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Politics (9/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify sources of Jewish immigration in the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries; discuss challenges that immigrants faced in both cultural and socioeconomic areas; describe how Jewish immigrants typically earned a living; identify institutions that helped Jews of the late 1800s maintain their culture and identity; outline steps undertaken by Jews of this era to "Americanize" themselves and their culture; discuss political trends among the Jewish community from the 1880s through the middle and late Twentieth century; identify key people who shaped the political viewpoints of the Jewish community from the 1880s through the middle and late Twentieth century; discuss the contributions of Jewish-American immigrants to American culture in the areas of arts and entertainment and identify key contributors thereto and describe their roles; discuss the influence that the Jewish press had on Jewish communities and the general society; identify great outlets of Jewish media in the late Nineteenth century and early Twentieth century and describe basic characteristics; outline the progress made by the Jewish community over the course of several generations beginning in the 1880s progressing to present day; identify contributions of key Jewish scholars to American thought and politics; discuss the journey outward from the initial community centered in lower Manhattan to the present Jewish communities that span the United States; and outline modern day challenges faced by American Jews and explain typical solutions.

Instruction:

This self-study course follows the Jewish immigration and settlement in the United States and covers the Jewish experience of Jewish immigrants, coming primarily from Eastern Europe and settling in the United States. Major topics include: initial group of Jewish immigrant community settling in the United States, development of the Jewish immigrant community from the 1800s to present day; hardships and trials established by early immigrants, increased successes of the community from financial and socioeconomic perspectives, contributions of the Jewish community to the American economy, government, and culture and famous and successful Jewish contributors in a variety of areas such entertainment, business, and art.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Eastern European Studies, or as General Elective (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: trace the historical development of the Jewish presence in the garment industry in the United States, England, and Germany; compare and contrast the development of the Jewish garment industry in the United States and England and explain reasons for the differences; identify challenges that Jews faced in the garment industry; discuss the role of societal attitudes towards fashion in the development of the Jews in the garment industry; describe the role of anti-Semitism in the Jewish relationship with the garment industry in the United States, England, and Germany; differentiate between the garment industry in New York as compared to smaller centers like Rochester, and between the growth of the mens wear and womens wear industries; connect major historical events to the development of the position of Jews in the garment industry; and identify reasons given for the economic success of Jewish immigrants in the United States and what this means to other immigrant groups.

Instruction:

This course examines the role of Jews in the garment and fashion industries, from simple laborers to manufacturers and department store owners and designers. The course focuses mainly on Jewish immigrants to the United States and their role in the garment industry from approximately 1840-1950. Major topics include: the Jewish role in the garment industry in England and Germany during a similar time frame; the development of the garment industry in New York and how that compares and contrasts to smaller centers such as Rochester and Cincinnati; consequences of significant historical events, such as the Gold Rush, the Civil War, the Progressive Era, and World War II, the impact of anti-Semitism, culminating with the Nazi destruction of the German fashion industry, justification to explain Jewish success in the garment industry and how it affected immigrant economic progress. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History, Jewish History, Judaic Studies, Sociology, or Anthropology (4/19).

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