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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Coopersmith Career Consulting | Evaluated Learning Experience

Eastern European Jewish Immigration and Settlement in the United States (HIS-301)

Location: 
Various; distance learning format.
Length: 

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates: 
May 2013 - Present.
Instructional delivery format: 
Proficiency exam
Learner Outcomes: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify sources of Jewish immigration in the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries; discuss challenges that immigrants faced in both cultural and socioeconomic areas; describe how Jewish immigrants typically earned a living; identify institutions that helped Jews of the late 1800s maintain their culture and identity; outline steps undertaken by Jews of this era to "Americanize" themselves and their culture; discuss political trends among the Jewish community from the 1880s through the middle and late Twentieth century; identify key people who shaped the political viewpoints of the Jewish community from the 1880s through the middle and late Twentieth century; discuss the contributions of Jewish-American immigrants to American culture in the areas of arts and entertainment and identify key contributors thereto and describe their roles; discuss the influence that the Jewish press had on Jewish communities and the general society; identify great outlets of Jewish media in the late Nineteenth century and early Twentieth century and describe basic characteristics; outline the progress made by the Jewish community over the course of several generations beginning in the 1880s progressing to present day; identify contributions of key Jewish scholars to American thought and politics; discuss the journey outward from the initial community centered in lower Manhattan to the present Jewish communities that span the United States; and outline modern day challenges faced by American Jews and explain typical solutions.

Instruction: 

This self-study course follows the Jewish immigration and settlement in the United States and covers the Jewish experience of Jewish immigrants, coming primarily from Eastern Europe and settling in the United States. Major topics include: initial group of Jewish immigrant community settling in the United States, development of the Jewish immigrant community from the 1800s to present day; hardships and trials established by early immigrants, increased successes of the community from financial and socioeconomic perspectives, contributions of the Jewish community to the American economy, government, and culture and famous and successful Jewish contributors in a variety of areas such entertainment, business, and art.

Credit recommendation: 

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Eastern European Studies, or as General Elective (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

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