Skip to main content

National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Coopersmith Career Consulting | Evaluated Learning Experience

Jewish Participation in the Garment Industry (HIS-302)

Location: 

Various; distance learning format.

Length: 

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates: 

April 2019 - Present. 

Instructional delivery format: 
Online/distance learning
Learner Outcomes: 

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: trace the historical development of the Jewish presence in the garment industry in the United States, England, and Germany; compare and contrast the development of the Jewish garment industry in the United States and England and explain reasons for the differences; identify challenges that Jews faced in the garment industry; discuss the role of societal attitudes towards fashion in the development of the Jews in the garment industry; describe the role of anti-Semitism in the Jewish relationship with the garment industry in the United States, England, and Germany; differentiate between the garment industry in New York as compared to smaller centers like Rochester, and between the growth of the mens wear and womens wear industries; connect major historical events to the development of the position of Jews in the garment industry; and identify reasons given for the economic success of Jewish immigrants in the United States and what this means to other immigrant groups.

Instruction: 

This course examines the role of Jews in the garment and fashion industries, from simple laborers to manufacturers and department store owners and designers. The course focuses mainly on Jewish immigrants to the United States and their role in the garment industry from approximately 1840-1950. Major topics include: the Jewish role in the garment industry in England and Germany during a similar time frame; the development of the garment industry in New York and how that compares and contrasts to smaller centers such as Rochester and Cincinnati; consequences of significant historical events, such as the Gold Rush, the Civil War, the Progressive Era, and World War II, the impact of anti-Semitism, culminating with the Nazi destruction of the German fashion industry, justification to explain Jewish success in the garment industry and how it affected immigrant economic progress. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation: 

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History, Jewish History, Judaic Studies, Sociology, or Anthropology (4/19).

Top