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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Education - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze children’s literature through multiple literary elements; compare various genres within children’s literature; articulate interpretations and discuss deeper meanings within children’s literature; identify ideologies within children’s literature; employ rhetorical modes to develop and write a literary analysis; and discuss themes in children's literature, including: social differences, family relations, independence, and others.

Instruction:

This course explores a wide selection of children’s literature. Students examine the impact children's literature has had on various generations. Major topics include: genres such as children’s classics, poetry, realistic fiction, folk and fairy tales, gender issues, and realism versus fantasy. Students take a deeper look at the stories they read as children and use literary elements such as themes, symbolism, characterization, and plot to analyze works written for children.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Children’s Literature, Early Childhood Education, or Elementary Education (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the purposes of assessment in early childhood and how infants and young children are assessed; describe elements of a comprehensive assessment system for children of all ages; explain how assessment results are used for instruction and evaluation of instructional programs; discuss how the assessment process should be implemented during the school year with school-age children; describe how test scores are reported and how and when they should be shared with parents; evaluate the pros and cons of standardized testing as well as other types of objective assessments; assist in ensuring the development and maintenance of checklists, rating scales, and rubrics; describe the types of assessments used with preschool and primary-grade children; assist in the crafting of quality portfolio assessment systems; and describe model portfolio assessment and reporting systems.

Instruction:

This course serves as an introduction to assessment in early childhood settings. Various means of assessment (i.e. formative, summative, authentic, traditional, etc.) are explored. Course materials are designed to increase students’ understanding of the critical role valid and reliable classroom assessment has in supporting learning in the classroom.  Additionally, students explore how to evaluate assessment data for instructional decision-making.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

April 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: examine the main objectives of a classroom management system and create an effective plan for managing a classroom environment; investigate themes from historical approaches to management that are still prevalent in the field today; compare the relevance of important classroom management terminologies and identify ways in which teachers can help students comprehend expectations; compare and contrast the classroom management recommendations made by leading theorists and experts in classroom management; analyze and evaluate student characteristics that may affect classroom management; evaluate classroom management plans and decisions; interpret the PBIS framework and the broad classroom management themes to which it corresponds; examine issues of diversity and how they impact classroom management and building meaningful relationships with students and their families.

Instruction:

Major topics include: an introduction to the essential elements and principles of classroom management, including behavior, motivation, discipline, communication, and engagement strategies. Students will also learn a variety of classroom management skills, that can be used establish organized and engaging classroom environments and establish positive and cooperative relationships with children and their parents/guardians using the developmentally appropriate classroom management strategies.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Classroom Management or Education (4/20).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine the contributions of creativity and imagination to the total learning of the child; discuss the scope and social and personal impact of the fine arts; explore methods of helping children discover the fine arts through practical experiences, materials, and museum experiences; promote understanding and appreciation of other cultures through research about prominent artists from various cultures, both globally and within the United States; and create and use the arts and aesthetics in integrating the arts into other disciplines in the elementary curriculum.

Instruction:

This course supports students as they examine children’s creative expression and critical thinking through art, drama, and music. Exam content reflects contemporary theory and practice and promotes ideas and skills that tap children's propensity for creativity and critical thinking. Numerous strategies of arts integration and examples of learning content through the visual arts, music, dance, and poetry are discussed.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the characteristics of early childhood programs and describe the steps generally necessary to plan and apply developmentally appropriate practices; discuss the responsibilities of early childhood professionals and how they facilitate learning through effective lesson planning and group placement; describe how program quality depends on the development of differentiated instructional approaches to meet students’ needs; and evaluate the importance of building communication skills to communicate effectively with parents and coworkers.

Instruction:

This course explores early childhood organizational plans, procedures, physical facilities and surveys appropriate materials and equipment. Emphasis is placed on the process of designing appropriate learning environments for young children and an integrated, developmental approach to curriculum and instruction in the early childhood education. The course covers all aspects of classroom life, the roles of children and adults in education, the physical and social environments, and the multiple developmental domains for children in early childhood education and provides a collaborative approach to curriculum development in early childhood education.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

April 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: interpret the factors that influence the effective teaching of mathematics; investigate what it means to do mathematics; contrast and describe approaches to problem solving; compare and contrast the features of a three-phase lesson plan format for problem-based lessons; differentiate between formative and summative assessment; differentiate between a modification and an accommodation; illustrate how teaching mathematics to very young children involves providing high quality number activities using a developmental approach; demonstrate how to develop children’s skills in generalizing the problem structures with additive situations involving joining, separating, part-part-whole, and comparison where the unknown can be in any position; investigate the interplay addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division and effective use of computational strategies to solve problems; exhibit the essential features of fraction and ratio, including how they are interrelated, and articulate ways to help students understand and be able to use both; analyze the measurement process, including the identification and use of nonstandard and standard units, and demonstrate how to estimate measurements; differentiate the four major geometry goals for students.

Instruction:

Major topics include: an introduction to concepts related to effective math instruction for elementary school students, various means of teaching foundational math concepts related to number sense, math mathematical operations, problem-solving strategies, integers, fractions, decimals, ratios, algebraic thinking, geometric conceptualization, and measurement, strategies for integrated math across other disciplines, incorporating culturally responsive teaching methods, and effective methods for developing math competency. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Elementary Education (4/20).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Various; distance learning format.

Dates:

April 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: paraphrase that science is observing, analyzing, and investigating to learn how the natural and physical world works; establish learning goals that are aligned to standards identify what students should know, understand, and be able to do at their grade level; illustrate how designing a positive classroom environment is essential to promote active inquiry learning; demonstrate how understanding science ideas means being able to explain, to interpret, to apply and adapt knowledge; demonstrate how inquiry-based instruction features practices needed to ask and try to answer a scientific question; illustrate how asking the right question is at the heart of teaching and learning; investigate how assessment processes provide opportunities to gather evidence of student learning (summative) or for student learning (formative) which can be evaluated to determine level of mastery of the identified learning goals; investigate how technology can be used support learning in the science classroom; demonstrate how science doesn’t happen in isolation but is connected to mathematics when the learning goals from each discipline and the student practice skills from both disciplines are linked; and scrutinize how equity, diversity, and achievement gaps should be considered when guiding all children to learn science.

Instruction:

Major topics include: an introduction to concepts related to effective science instruction for elementary school students, including the nature of science, inquiry-based instruction, effective learning environments, teaching for understanding, using the 5E engagement model, and questioning strategies, strategies for integrated science across other disciplines by incorporating technology.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Elementary Education (4/20)

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: assist in the creation of a program where learning, caring, and parental collaboration exists; interact with students from diverse backgrounds; develop a culturally sensitive partnership between home and school that encourages various methods of volunteering; assist in the development of policies that foment a culturally and linguistically appropriate ecology that encourages learning; and describe historical development of views on children and how those views affect family life.

Instruction:

This course provides the guidelines for creating effective partnerships with families and an overview of the diversity of modern families and emphasizes examining elements that create successful partnerships and programs that work.  Students explore how to encourage parental engagement and how to adapt strategies to create that connection to meet specific needs of various schools and communities.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

Location:

Varies; distance learning format

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

September 2016 – Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the causes of the increased professionalization of teaching in the United States today and the ramifications of this phenomenon; link educational philosophies to applied educational practices; describe the development of American education and the factors that have influenced it, from roots in classical western civilization through the current times; compare/contrast and apply different theories of education, curriculum and instruction; apply principles of multicultural education to classroom instruction; identify at-risk behaviors and proper responses to such behaviors; and identify methods that can decrease or remove racial, ethnic or gender gaps in education.

Instruction:

This graduate-level course is a broad study of the philosophical and social foundations of education in the United States. Students become proficient in terminologies, educational theories, practice and legislation relevant to the American educational system. Students link previously developed educational ideas to present practices and compare and contrast the benefits and deficiencies of the applications of these ideas.  After being exposed to this information, students are encouraged to implement these theories into practice. In addition to taking a final examination on course content, students are required to write two research papers on assigned topics and must successfully complete both of these assignments in order to receive credit recommendations. 

Credit recommendation:

In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education (9/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how basic physical health, mental health, nutrition, and safety needs influence the growth and development of young children and explain how policies support those needs; implement and evaluate research-based basic health, safety, and nutritional practices and enact strategies for encouraging the of practice safe behaviors for students in the classroom and in their communities; explain and identify ways to maintain the health, safety, and wellness of young children including: identifying hazards and risks; conducting regular health and safety assessments consistent with regulations and quality standards; reporting child abuse; and taking corrective action when necessary; identify signs, symptoms, and emergency treatment options of childhood diseases and those which might indicate physical, sexual, and psychological abuse or neglect, and analyze the impact of stress and trauma on children, families, and the broader community; identify and describe first aid procedures, emergency response procedures, recordkeeping, communication processes, and related legal, ethical, and policy issues related to medical services to families and co-workers; explain ways to create culturally responsive, nutrition plans and identify strategies supportive of collaboration with families and health professionals in meeting children’s individual health and nutritional needs; provide examples of effective health and immunization record-keeping systems; recognize, document, and report child maltreatment, and methods for caring for an abused child; explain the importance that stable, responsive, and consistent caregiving and good communication has on providing children with an optimum environment for good mental health; identify and describe culturally responsive strategies for engaging with families and communities to preserve the health, safety, and wellness of young children.

Instruction:

This course is designed to provide early childhood educators with the knowledge and skills needed to engage in developmentally appropriate practices in health promotion, wellness, and safety for young children from diverse backgrounds and abilities levels within the context of the school, family, and community.  Major topics include: physical and mental health, nutrition, safety, communication, and record-keeping.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Children’s Health, Children’s Safety, or Children’s Mental Health (8/18).

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