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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Business and Accounting - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced)

Dates:

August 2017 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the communication process and explain the importance of effective business communication; explain how diversity in organizations affects business communications; identify techniques and strategies for improving interpersonal communications; describe social media tools and explain how they are changing the nature of business communications; explain how computer technologies are used for communicating in the business environment, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, email, and presentation software); evaluate business messages, reports, and proposals; and develop and deliver oral presentations.

Instruction:

This course provides students with knowledge and skills to effectively communicate in global business environments. Students identify and use computer technologies and social media tools for conducting interpersonal communications with diverse organizations. Additionally, students develop and evaluate both written and oral business communications.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Communications, Cultural Studies, Arts, Education or College Success (8/17). NOTE: Completion of four writing assignments, one audio/visual presentation and a final examination is a requirement for students who want to access credit recommendations.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the changes affecting managerial; clarify why self-awareness is vital to professional effectiveness and well-being; develop a personal brand that is consistent with how it should be perceived; describe how trust contributes to individual and organizational effectiveness; contrast what does and does not predict happiness; explain how jobs can affect health; and analyze how to use cross-cultural etiquette effectively in an organization.

Instruction:

This course provides students with professional behavior guidelines, including: suggestions on the standards of appearance, actions and attitude in the business environment, and handling a variety of social and business situations, networking meetings, and meals.  Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management, Marketing, or Human Resources (4/19).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

November 2020 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: assess the legal and ethical consequences of business decisions and the impacts of business on the welfare of the greater society; determine when and where a dispute can be settled in a legal forum; solve business-related problems by applying laws and legal concepts; discuss and apply functional areas of law such as torts, business organizations, contracts, sales, and real property; and apply business law concepts to hypothetical scenarios.

Instruction:

Business Law (BUS-312) is a self-study course that culminates in a final examination. The course explores the fundamentals of litigation, laws of torts, contracts, business organizations, sales and property under the Uniform Commercial Code and various other common law and statutory law sources.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Law, Management, Marketing, or Human Resources (11/20).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the stages and elements of the negotiation process; compile the skills and techniques of a successful negotiator; differentiate negotiation styles and mental models, analyze their own behavior in negotiations; contrast the methods to counter manipulation and psychological press in negotiations; discuss the actions taken at different stages of negotiations; explain the important of pre-negotiation and post-negotiation phases and compare the roles and functions in negotiation teams; analyze the skills of organizing and managing negotiation teams; clarify the purposes of the best alternative to a negotiated agreement; and differentiate between positions from interests in negotiations.

Instruction:

This course provides students with the ability to develop analytical and communication skills necessary for successful negotiations, as a complex three-stage process, consisting of preparation, negotiating, and post-negotiation implementation and evaluation. Instruction combines both theoretical knowledge of leading negotiation scholars and practical experience through learning by doing.  Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management, Marketing, Paralegal Studies, Operations Management, Human Resources, or Entrepreneurship Studies (4/19).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe why brands have become so important; compare brand identity, image, and personality; explain how brands reduce consumers’ perceived risks; critique the “pyramid” from brand awareness to brand loyalty; measure brand equality and brand value; specify why brand position and brand image are not the same; explain how social media accelerates "word of mouth"; interpret how the three brand components are built over time; describe how the brand name, brand logo, slogan and spokesperson fit together; identify the ways in which the Internet has made almost all brands “global”; and analyze how personal branding can help individuals set goals for themselves.

Instruction:

This course introduces students to basic concepts of brands and brand management to help them analyze how a brand can affect customers’ perceptions of products and services, and to teach how successful branding strategies can be designed.  The material is focused on the effective branding of products and services while building on the general fundamentals of strategic marketing. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communication, Business Management, Sales, Marketing, or Self-Management (4/19).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain fraud and identify the environments in which it takes place; recognize fraud schemes and determine ways in which they are concealed; review financial and non-financial records to uncover fraud; understand how effective interviews are conducted; document work product and maintain chains of custody; apply audit skills such as completeness, tracing, and independent verification; describe the civil, criminal and regulatory framework of fraud examinations; understand the role of computer forensic specialists; and communicate effectively and present findings through written reports. 

Instruction:

Forensic Accounting (ACC-325) introduces students to forensic accounting, with a significant focus on fraud examination. In the first half of the semester, we study the elements of fraud and the types of fraud schemes, including fraudulent financial statements, asset misappropriation, corruption, and money laundering. In the second half, we focus on how professionals respond to fraud, emphasizing the legal framework, document analysis, interviewing, and report writing. The demand for fraud examiners and forensic accountants continues to grow in both the private and public sectors. Skills developed in this course will help students in multiple professions, including professional accounting, auditing, criminal investigation, and general business.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Accounting, Forensic Accounting, or as a general elective (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe various important business issues as they relate to new ventures; identify and appreciate the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of an entrepreneur; prepare a coherent business plan; explain the essential steps necessary to create and operate a small business enterprise; and describe the fundamental financial requirements and competencies for small business startups.

Instruction:

This course provides students with a basic understanding of how an entrepreneur assumes all the risks and rewards of a venture.  Entrepreneurs who prove to be successful in taking on the risks of a startup are rewarded with profits, fame, and continued growth opportunities. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Entrepreneurship, Business Management, Marketing, Management, or Economics (4/19).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
September 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: outline the organizational management structures typical for most organizations; assist in planning and strategic management of organizations; propose methods by which organizational decisions can be made in a variety of circumstances; define and explain the concept of entrepreneurship and specific problems that arise in the course of new venture management; describe issues that typically arise during the process of organizational change and innovation; identify and help solve issues that arise in managing human resources and the behavior of individuals within an organization; propose ideas that would help motivate employees to improve their performance; explain the importance of leadership and influence processes to the performance of organizations; outline the importance of communication in organizations and steps that could be taken to improve the same; and prescribe steps that may be taken to improve the managing of groups and teams, the control process and operations, and quality and productivity.

Instruction:

This self-study course examines fundamental management concepts and managerial responsibilities in both formal and informal organizational structures by providing students with a foundation of management principles. Major topics include: planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and staffing.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management or Business (9/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the historical and present day importance of Human Resources Management (HRM) and its related subcategories; utilize, identify, and describe the theories of HRM and apply theories to practical organizational occurrences; identify and demonstrate appropriate HRM terminology when discussing the discipline; critically analyze the importance of micro, meso, and macro level job analysis; convey the importance of HRM compliance in relationship to laws, regulations, and diversity; compare and contrast the importance of training and development; explain and conceptualize the components associated with compensation and benefits; and apply legal knowledge related to organizational governance to “real world” situations.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an introductory overview of the topic of Human Resource Management (HRM) and focuses on the study of various components supporting strategic functionality of an organization.  Major topics include, but are not limited to: the law, governance, employee rights, organizational diversity, staffing, employee development, compensation and benefits, international HRM.  The course begins with an introduction to the historical and present-day role of HRM, including relevant vocabulary used in the field.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resource Management, Management, Operations Management, Business Communications, or Entrepreneurship (8/18).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: apply analytical techniques supported by generally accepted accounting principles to solve financial reporting issues and recognize ethical issues related to liability and owners' equity accounts, including but not limited to long-term bonds and notes payable, common and preferred stock, leases, and pensions; analyze, classify and record investments in debt and equity securities and related realized and unrealized gains, losses, interest, and dividend payments; compute basic and diluted earnings per share; analyze and record revenue agreements that deviate from recognition at the time of sale; explain the computation, classification, and reporting of deferred tax amounts arising from differences between financial and tax reporting requirements; explain the need for a more detailed Statement of Cash Flows than that introduced in the introductory financial accounting course.

Instruction:

Intermediate Accounting(ACC-301) is the first course in a two-course sequence that covers financial reporting for external parties. The purpose of financial reporting is to provide meaningful information to individuals and institutions that have an interest in business, whether they be investors, creditors, or managers. It is a company's accounting system that creates and provides this vital information to investors and creditors. Business managers likewise need information produced through financial accounting in making day-to-day operational decisions that improve a company's performance and profitability.

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