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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Business and Accounting - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced)

Dates:

August 2017 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the communication process and explain the importance of effective business communication; explain how diversity in organizations affects business communications; identify techniques and strategies for improving interpersonal communications; describe social media tools and explain how they are changing the nature of business communications; explain how computer technologies are used for communicating in the business environment, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, email, and presentation software); evaluate business messages, reports, and proposals; and develop and deliver oral presentations.

Instruction:

This course provide students with knowledge and skills to effectively communicate in global business environments. Students identify and use computer technologies and social media tools for conducting interpersonal communications with diverse organizations. Additionally, students develop and evaluate both written and oral business communications.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Communications, Cultural Studies, Arts, Education or College Success (8/17). NOTE: Completion of four writing assignments, one audio/visual presentation and a final examination is a requirement for students who want to access credit recommendations.

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the changes affecting managerial; clarify why self-awareness is vital to professional effectiveness and well-being; develop a personal brand that is consistent with how it should be perceived; describe how trust contributes to individual and organizational effectiveness; contrast what does and does not predict happiness; explain how jobs can affect health; and analyze how to use cross-cultural etiquette effectively in an organization.

Instruction:

This course provides students with professional behavior guidelines, including: suggestions on the standards of appearance, actions and attitude in the business environment, and handling a variety of social and business situations, networking meetings, and meals.  Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management, Marketing, or Human Resources (4/19).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the stages and elements of the negotiation process; compile the skills and techniques of a successful negotiator; differentiate negotiation styles and mental models, analyze their own behavior in negotiations; contrast the methods to counter manipulation and psychological press in negotiations; discuss the actions taken at different stages of negotiations; explain the important of pre-negotiation and post-negotiation phases and compare the roles and functions in negotiation teams; analyze the skills of organizing and managing negotiation teams; clarify the purposes of the best alternative to a negotiated agreement; and differentiate between positions from interests in negotiations.

Instruction:

This course provides students with the ability to develop analytical and communication skills necessary for successful negotiations, as a complex three-stage process, consisting of preparation, negotiating, and post-negotiation implementation and evaluation. Instruction combines both theoretical knowledge of leading negotiation scholars and practical experience through learning by doing.  Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management, Marketing, Paralegal Studies, Operations Management, Human Resources, or Entrepreneurship Studies (4/19).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe why brands have become so important; compare brand identity, image, and personality; explain how brands reduce consumers’ perceived risks; critique the “pyramid” from brand awareness to brand loyalty; measure brand equality and brand value; specify why brand position and brand image are not the same; explain how social media accelerates "word of mouth"; interpret how the three brand components are built over time; describe how the brand name, brand logo, slogan and spokesperson fit together; identify the ways in which the Internet has made almost all brands “global”; and analyze how personal branding can help individuals set goals for themselves.

Instruction:

This course introduces students to basic concepts of brands and brand management to help them analyze how a brand can affect customers’ perceptions of products and services, and to teach how successful branding strategies can be designed.  The material is focused on the effective branding of products and services while building on the general fundamentals of strategic marketing. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communication, Business Management, Sales, Marketing, or Self-Management (4/19).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe various important business issues as they relate to new ventures; identify and appreciate the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of an entrepreneur; prepare a coherent business plan; explain the essential steps necessary to create and operate a small business enterprise; and describe the fundamental financial requirements and competencies for small business startups.

Instruction:

This course provides students with a basic understanding of how an entrepreneur assumes all the risks and rewards of a venture.  Entrepreneurs who prove to be successful in taking on the risks of a startup are rewarded with profits, fame, and continued growth opportunities. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Entrepreneurship, Business Management, Marketing, Management, or Economics (4/19).

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
September 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: outline the organizational management structures typical for most organizations; assist in planning and strategic management of organizations; propose methods by which organizational decisions can be made in a variety of circumstances; define and explain the concept of entrepreneurship and specific problems that arise in the course of new venture management; describe issues that typically arise during the process of organizational change and innovation; identify and help solve issues that arise in managing human resources and the behavior of individuals within an organization; propose ideas that would help motivate employees to improve their performance; explain the importance of leadership and influence processes to the performance of organizations; outline the importance of communication in organizations and steps that could be taken to improve the same; and prescribe steps that may be taken to improve the managing of groups and teams, the control process and operations, and quality and productivity.

Instruction:
This self-study course examines fundamental management concepts and managerial responsibilities in both formal and informal organizational structures by providing students with a foundation of management principles. Major topics include: planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and staffing.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management or Business (9/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the historical and present day importance of Human Resources Management (HRM) and its related subcategories; utilize, identify, and describe the theories of HRM and apply theories to practical organizational occurrences; identify and demonstrate appropriate HRM terminology when discussing the discipline; critically analyze the importance of micro, meso, and macro level job analysis; convey the importance of HRM compliance in relationship to laws, regulations, and diversity; compare and contrast the importance of training and development; explain and conceptualize the components associated with compensation and benefits; and apply legal knowledge related to organizational governance to “real world” situations.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an introductory overview of the topic of Human Resource Management (HRM) and focuses on the study of various components supporting strategic functionality of an organization.  Major topics include, but are not limited to: the law, governance, employee rights, organizational diversity, staffing, employee development, compensation and benefits, international HRM.  This course begins with an introduction to the historical and present-day role of HRM, including relevant vocabulary used in the field.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resource Management, Management, Operations Management, Business Communications, or Entrepreneurship (8/18).

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2013 - July 2018. Version 2: August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify national differences in politics and culture; illustrate the effects of ethics on international business; explain international trade theory; describe the political economy of international business; outline the effect of foreign direct investment; discuss examples of regional economic integration; demonstrate how the foreign exchange markets work; identify and explain the roles of the international monetary system and global capital markets; show various strategies and organizational structures in international businesses; identify and choose the appropriate entry strategy and necessary strategic alliances given a fact set; lay out the details and differences between exporting, importing, and counter trade; show how global production, outsourcing, and logistics affect the international marketplace; explain how cultural and national differences affect global marketing and Research and Development; and account for international business using various countries as stakeholders.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This self-study course provides an introduction to International Business and explores pros and cons of economic theories, government policies, business strategies and organizational structures in the global business world, differences in economies, differing ethical issues facing executives and how politics play a large role in international commerce. Major topics include: global trade and investment strategy with particular importance placed on the global monetary system, the strategy and structure of the international business environment while exploring the actual operational practices, managerial implications of each topic on the actual practice of international business, and the opportunities and risks associated with conducting business on a global basis.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in International Business or Business (9/13). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in International Business or Business (8/18 revalidation). 

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
September 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the importance of managing profitable customer relationships; identify important steps in partnering to build customer relationships; assist in managing marketing relationships; read and interpret trends in consumer and business buying behavior from given statistics; define segmentation, targeting, and positioning and explain their importance in marketing; assist in the construction of product, services, and branding strategies; determine the relevant factors to be considered during new product development; identify pricing considerations and strategies important in marketing products; assist in determining which marketing channels are likely to be effective in marketing a given product under a specific scenario; help manage advertising, sales promotion, and public relations; and describe and define key features that exist in marketing over the internet and marketing through other media.

Instruction:

This self-study course examines fundamental principles, problems, and practices of marketing by providing students with a foundation of marketing principles including product, price, placement, and promotion.  Special focus is on the functions of marketing and the relationship to the production and distribution of goods and services that are ultimately purchased by the consumer.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Marketing, Management, or Business (9/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

June 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss major macroeconomic issues of growth, unemployment and inflation; identify and measure economic growth, define, measure, and compare GDP; follow unemployment data via the business cycle; describe the effects of aggregate demand and aggregate supply fluctuations in relation to macroeconomic equilibrium; compare and contrast varied macroeconomics models, including the classic growth, neoclassical, and new growth theories; identify and discuss the underlying causes of inflation and describe the effects of demand-pull and cost-push inflation; use the Philips curve to describe the relationship between inflation and unemployment in the short and long run; identify and discuss the role of the Federal Reserve Bank and monetary policy; and discuss the impacts of governmental budgets and fiscal policy and taxes on saving and investment.

Instruction:

This is an introductory course in Macroeconomics for students with no prior background in Economics. The instructional approach is mainly non-quantitative, but graphical analysis is covered. Students learn basic macroeconomic concepts on the aggregate demand and aggregate supply of outputs in the general economy, economic growth and unemployment, and the role of money and banking institutions in affecting the economy’s price level and inflation. Students study various fiscal and monetary policies used by the government to stabilize economic fluctuations. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. Prerequisite: Some background in college algebra and/or statistics is required.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Marketing, Finance, Economics, Human Resources, or as a general elective (6/16).

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