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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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English - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define literary canon, including issues of history, culture, race, ethnicity, and gender; identify and analyze fundamental literary elements and devices within a text; utilize a wide range of literary terms relating to literary history; synthesize ideas in literary form and use literary terms in correct historical context; and develop and carry out research-based writings formulated on literary context including locating, evaluating, organizing, and incorporating information; write clear and grammatically correct sentences; and correctly utilize MLA format to all written work.
Instruction:

This self-study course provides students with an overview of the important writers and works of American Literature from World War II to contemporary times. Class discussions focus on nonfiction essays, documents, poems, speeches, and short stories and their relevance to respective historical time periods. Students are responsible for reading required works and choose supplemental readings in a genre of their choice to enhance their literary education. Major topics include: Twentieth Century Literature, Confessional Poetry, Short Stories, Asian American writers, Native American writers, Pulitzer Prize Award Winners, Humor, Modern Memoir, Historical Fiction, Science Fiction, Popular books, and bestseller lists.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or Literature (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

May 2013 - Present.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: recognize and appreciate the importance of American Literary texts; perform close readings and explicate texts written in various modes; identify and analyze fundamental literary elements and devices within various texts including nonfiction, fiction, speech, and poetry; synthesize ideas in literary form and use literary terms in correct historical context; develop and carry out research-based writings formulated on literary context including locating, evaluating, organizing, and incorporating information; write clear and grammatically correct sentences; and correctly apply MLA format to all written work.
Instruction:

This self-study course provides students with an overview of the important writers and works of 500 years of American Literature from Early America to World War II. Class discussions focus on nonfiction essays, documents, poems, speeches, and short stories and their relevance to respective historical time periods. Students are responsible for required works and choose supplemental readings in a genre of their choice to enhance and inform their literary education. Major topics include: Literature of Early America-Colonial, Literature of the Eighteenth Century, Defining America and Americans, Early to Mid-Nineteenth Century, Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Humor and Satire, and finding meaning.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or Literature (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the centrality of clear and efficient writing in today's business environment and the major obstacles therein; adjust sentence style to improve clarity, determination, and emphasis; create smooth and varied transitions between sentences and paragraphs; perform accurate audience analyses and correlate them with specific purposes; create coherent outlines and apply a range of other organizational techniques; distinguish between routine and non-routine communications between direct and indirect organizational plans; compose effective titles and closings for a range of business documents; discuss and apply strategies for motivation and persuasion and apply them to sales letters, claims, and proposals; successfully buffer and deliver bad news in adjustment letters and evaluations; responsibly gather data from both primary and secondary sources and analyze the data; and plan and execute periodic reports, project proposals, and research proposals.

Instruction:
This self-study course is designed to give students a conceptual understanding of what is important in various genres of business writing and the ability to competently execute documents in those genres. Students learn how to plan, compose, and execute effective business documents according to current professional standards. Major focus is on considerations of purpose, audience, organization, and style and provides both broad guidelines for composition and targeted strategies for specific kinds of documents. Special attention is given to the collection and analysis of data for use in reports and presentations.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Writing (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:

Various;distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: recognize and describe the types of arguments made in any persuasive argument; translate written plain language arguments into symbolic language; test arguments for validity using established principles of logical reasoning; communicate in writing in logically persuasive manners and use arguments that are logically valid; apply abstract logical principles to concrete arguments and circumstances; and distinguish between various types of reasoning, including inductive, deductive and analogical.

Instruction:

This exam is about determining whether an argument is sound using logical principles and teaches students to commit logical arguments to paper and to evaluate written arguments. Students use various types of reasoning, including inductive, deductive and analogical reasoning so they are better equipped to make determinations as to the validity of an argument.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or as a general elective (6/17).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: develop and refine the rhetorical voice; identify and employ rhetorical appeal in print visual media and use them correctly in their writing; discuss logical fallacies in text and visual media and learn to eliminate them in their writing; identify and analyze the use of value and descriptive assumptions; develop writing topics based on specific situations; write rhetorically and objectively on demand, using research sources; correctly apply MLA citation and formatting styles in all writing assignments; read and view with a keenly critical eye and mind; and integrate other writers' work as an essential seamless part of writing. Additionally, students continue to develop standard composition skills, including: essay topics, thesis statements, outlines, topic sentences, grammar, mechanics, editing process, sources, and bibliographies.

Instruction:
This self-study course requires students to submit three graded written assignments and culminates with a final exam. Additionally, there are fourteen reading assignments that focus on critical reading and visual rhetoric with critical commentary; informative essay; and rhetorical analysis.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or Literature (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

September 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate mastery of clear and effective writing through carefully written analyses of exemplary models of literature; identify and apply various rhetorical modes in English Composition, focusing on the expository and argumentative approaches; identify elements of a theme and its evidence presented by the author throughout a piece of literature; effectively read and analyze a poem and its components, focusing on rhythm, how a poem sounds versus how it reads, and demonstrate improved mastery of word choice and poetic devices in the writing of poetry; actively engage literary works to develop creative interpretations through an individualized strong reading of classic short stories, poetry, and drama; compose a literary argument with appropriate documentation related to context from selected pieces of fiction; develop techniques for addressing opposing views to insure that the basic theme of a paper is adequately supported; recognize and assess the philosophical or analytic approaches that literary critics adopt as templates for understanding the meaning behind a piece of writing and identify potential bias of an author or critic; write an in-depth research paper demonstrating a discriminating focus upon what constitutes good literature and facility with MLA format and specific requirements for citing references; and recognize various forms of plagiarism, both benign and intentional.

Instruction:
This self-study course builds on the expository writing skills developed in English Composition I and helps students further develop critical writing and thinking skills through in-depth readings, analyses of literature, and translating thoughts across a range of disciplines. Students read a variety of genres including fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry and develop their own interpretation with greater clarity and depth. Students also employ literary theories that distinguish between literal and figurative meaning as well as cultural, political, or philosophical underpinnings of particular literary pieces. Students research and address opposing views of critics' interpretations of literary works and assert their own positions. Major topics include: Themes in Fiction, Poetry, Writing Literary Arguments, Literary Criticism, and Critical Thinking about Writing.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in College Composition II, Literary Research Methods, or as Liberal Arts elective (9/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

May 2013 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define information literacy; outline specific skills required for someone to be informational-literate in current society; assess the importance of knowing how to access, evaluate, and utilize information in an academic or work environment; explain challenges faced by non-literate people; develop key and relevant research questions; distinguish between primary and secondary information sources and reliable and non-reliable sources; note the various ways to access information; use library resources to gather information; evaluate information from a variety of sources; access relevant information electronically; identify criteria necessary when evaluating information gleaned from the internet; select appropriate methods to organize information for maximum utility and future reference; list methods to organize verbal and visual information;explain the importance of privacy and security and how they can become endangered and protected in certain environments; define various intellectual property rights that protect information; and engage in appropriate electronic discussions and presentations.

Instruction:

This self-study course requires students to complete approximately six reading assignments and pass a final exam. Major topics include: information literacy in the modern world and defining the need for information as it relates to the research paper; evaluating authority; organizing information; and legal, ethical, and communication issues.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in English or Literature (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the principal goals of a given speech and ensure that speeches are organized in order to achieve those goals; distinguish between hearing, listening, and critical listening and determine which techniques assist in gaining maximum critical listening participation from an audience; properly research the content and ideas of the speech to gain support for the ideas that the speaker is presenting and appropriately incorporate those ideas into a speech; outline a speech as a means to develop raw ideas into appropriate presentations and visual aids; and organize a speech that includes introduction, transitions, body of the speech, and conclusion.
Instruction:

This self-study course provides an overview of public speaking techniques, goals, and procedures. The course begins with a discussion of presentation of speeches in general and ways to encourage maximum audience attentiveness. Other topics are: researching speeches and planning presentations to ensure maximum effectiveness, writing and organizing speeches, persuading and informing audiences, and adapting speeches depending on the event, environment, and audience.Students are required to deliver four oral speeches of varying lengths on assigned topics as described in the course syllabus and successfully pass a final examination to earn credit recommendations for this course.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communications (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and synthesize works of Medieval Jewish poets from Spain, including cultural background and background of Jewish poetry; define common poetic tools, styles, and features; identify styles of major poets and their key works and accomplishments; and become well-versed in various genres of piyut and how and when they are used.
Instruction:
This self-study course provides background on the great poetry of the Jews of Medieval Spain, background on the history of Jewish poetry and Jewish settlements and culture in Spain with special emphasis on the piyut (liturgical poem) as developed by the Spanish poets that still exist today.
Credit recommendation:

In the upper division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religion, Medieval Literature, Poetry, Sociology, or as General Elective (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

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