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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Exercise Science - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Varies; distance learning format
Length:

Varies (self study; self-paced).

Dates:

January 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the background for athletic training and its employment opportunities; discuss the components of the pre-participation physical exam and fitness testing procedures; relate nutritional health to performance and discuss the nutritional needs of the active individual; outline varying environmental conditions and describe how the illnesses they cause can be prevented; illustrate different forms of injury prevention and the liabilities inherent in sports training; describe how preexisting medical conditions affect the trainee and be able to recognize clinical injuries in all parts of the body; detect certain emergency situations and describe the role and responsibilities of EMS professionals; relate rehabilitation, healing, and drugs to therapeutic exercise and synthesize different treatment plans; and describe financial and human resource management strategies for personal trainers.

Instruction:

This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. It provides students with an extensive background in athletic training and acute and emergency care as a profession. Students who are coaching majors need to understand the extent of athletic trainers’ required knowledge and the importance of therapeutic intervention and health care administration so that they might better understand their role in the health care of physically active patients. Students who are majoring in athletic training will find in this essential background on which to build their complete education. Recommended Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology (SCI-201) or equivalent. 

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Athletic Training (1/15).

Location:
Varies; distance learning format
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

January 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the pathophysiology of the diseases covered in the course; select exercises for  patients based on their clinical considerations; evaluate patients' medical history and apply when formulating exercise prescriptions; conduct a graded exercise test and  prescribe exercises for all people, both healthy and those with clinical and/or medical diseases; provide an exercise prescription and exercise training regimen specific to patients' individual needs; and recommend exercise training to people of special populations with the consideration of their individual needs.

Instruction:

This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. The study covers a variety of physiological disorders and diseases that require special exercise considerations. The course first covers an introduction to clinical exercise and general skills such as examination and interview skills as well as exercise testing and prescribing. The course then shifts to a discussion of individual diseases and their related exercises. Endocrinology and metabolic disorders are discussed, followed by cardiovascular diseases. The pathophysiology, clinical considerations, and exercises as a part of treatment are discussed and applied for each disease. The scope of each disease is also described. The final examination will ask students to read a series of case studies and respond to questions on each one in paragraph form in order to demonstrate mastery of the materials.

Recommended Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Athletic Training, Exercise Physiology, or Exercise Science (1/15).

Location:
Various; distance learning format
Length:

Varies (self study; self-paced).

Dates:

January 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the pathophysiology of the diseases covered in the course; select exercises for  patients based on their clinical considerations; evaluate patients' medical history and apply when formulating exercise prescriptions; conduct a graded exercise test and  prescribe exercises for all people, both healthy and those with clinical and/or medical diseases; provide an exercise prescription and exercise training regimen specific to patients' individual needs; and recommend exercise training to people of special populations with the consideration of their individual needs.

Instruction:

This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. The study covers a variety of physiological disorders and diseases that require special exercise considerations. The course first covers respiratory diseases and the exercises which patients can perform to maintain or gain back their health, then shifts to a discussion of immune related diseases such as cancer. Clinical considerations, pathophysiology, and exercise training are described. The course also discusses disorders of bone and joints, as well as select neuromuscular disorders.  Finally, the course discusses special populations, including children, older adults, people with clinical depression, and people with intellectual disabilities. Within each topic, clinical considerations are factored in and the exercise training is described.The final examination asks students to read a series of case studies and respond to questions on each one in paragraph form in order to demonstrate mastery of the materials. Recommended Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology (SCI-201) or equivalent. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Athletic Training, Exercise Physiology, or Exercise Science (1/15).

Location:
Various; distance learning format
Length:

Varies (self study; self-paced).

Dates:

January 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify all the bones of the human body and their anatomical landmarks; describe the roles of the ligaments that attach the bones and form the major joints of the human body in human locomotion and movement; identify the major muscles of the human body that cross the joints; describe the fundamental movements created in the human body’s joints by the muscles that cross the joints; and determine the effect of muscular and skeletal movement on the major blood vessels and the major nerves of the human body.

Instruction:

This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. This course is designed to introduce the structures of human anatomy and explain how these structures are involved in human movement. Numerous illustrations and optional opportunities for are provided to enhance the learning of human anatomy.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 1 semester hour in Personal Training (1/15).

Location:
Various; distance learning format
Length:

Varies (self study;self-paced).

Dates:

January 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: illustrate and describe the developmental continuum for life-span motor behavior; discuss each component of biological development and the changes each area brings at different life stages; evaluate how perception and information-processing affect motor control as well human development; compare the stages of motor development across the life span and describe the changes as one ages; describe the purposes of motor assessment and identify the tools necessary for each stage; and analyze the sociocultural influences on motor development and identify the role different influences play.

Instruction:

This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. This is a science-based course covering background, theory, and research in the field of physical growth and motor behavior across the life span, as well as the practical application of these concepts. The course begins with an introduction to changes in the body, from neurological to physiological and discusses what factors affect these changes. The course then focuses on motor control and development through every life stage. Sociocultural influences are described. Students learn how to assess these changes and understand their importance as a factor of human growth.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Exercise Science, or Physical Education (1/15).

Location:
Various; distance learning format
Length:

Varies (self study; self-paced).

Dates:

January 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the background for athletic training and its employment opportunities; discuss the components of the pre-participation physical exam and fitness testing procedures; relate nutritional health to performance and discuss the nutritional needs of the active individual; outline varying environmental conditions and describe how the illnesses they cause can be prevented; illustrate different forms of injury prevention and the liabilities inherent in sports training; describe how preexisting medical conditions affect the trainee and be able to recognize clinical injuries in all parts of the body; detect certain emergency situations and describe the role and responsibilities of EMS professionals; relate rehabilitation, healing, and drugs to therapeutic exercise and synthesize different treatment plans; and describe financial and human resource management strategies for personal trainers.

Instruction:

This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. This is a course for students with no prior background in the subject. The course begins with a background description of the field and continues with the history of the profession, then shifts to the actual role of the health education professional.  Focus is placed on the ethics, responsibilities, and required certifications one is required to have in the field. Students also learn about theories and planning models of health promotion. Additionally, the course teaches the setting for health education and promotion, as well as the agencies involved. Finally, the course covers the future of this growing field.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Exercise Science, or Physical Education (1/15).

Location:

Varies; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self study; self-paced).

Dates:

August 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate how sports nutrition knowledge can be applied; identify factors that need to be considered when developing an individualized sports nutrition plan; describe how nutrients are digested, absorbed, transported, and assimilated in the body; explain the three energy systems, their characteristics, and the metabolic pathways associated with each and how they work to supply ATP during sport performance; explain how the macronutrients are utilized during exercise; discuss the type, quantity, and timing of carbohydrate, protein and fat consumption before, during and after exercise or competition; describe the functions of vitamins, their effects on energy systems, their deficiency and toxicity symptoms, their importance to sports performance, and vitamin-rich food sources and meal-planning tips; list the dietary recommendations, functions, effects on energy systems, deficiency and toxicity symptoms, importance to sport performance, food sources, and meal-planning tips for the major and trace minerals; identify some of the commonly used ergogenic aid used by athletes, their proposed beneficial effects and potential adverse outcomes; outline the nutritional considerations of endurance vs strength athletes; discuss the energy systems that are utilized during strength/power and endurance exercise; apply knowledge of sports nutrition to meal planning and event logistics that need to be considered various individual and team sporting events; describe the nutritional considerations for athletes who have diabetes, are pregnant, child and teen athletes, college athletes, vegetarians, and team sport athletes.

Instruction:

This course teaches students to apply nutrition science to fitness, exercise and sport. Instruction focuses on the way sports nutrition combines the principles of nutrition science and exercise physiology with the underlying objective to improve physical performance and provides students with an understanding of the relationships with diet, food nutrients and essential dietary components and optimal sports performance across a range of physical activities, life stages and health conditions.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sports Nutrition (8/18).

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