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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Judaic Studies - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: assess the more complex details of the concepts and laws of blessings according to the halacha of the Jewish religion.  Students will be required to identify and explain major points of disagreement among the early sources.  In addition, students will be able to successfully apply major principles and individual details to various circumstances.  

Instruction:

Advanced Studies of Blessings I (JST-315) is a self-study course that culminates in a final examination. Students will become familiarized with the primary sources of halacha through Tur and Beis Yosef, gaining the ability to trace halacha to its source and identify the points of dispute among rishonim.  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and sources for complex laws of brachos and the ability to apply their knowledge of the halachic principles of brachos to various situations and analyze what rules come into play in any given case.  Topics will include the underlying meaning and reasons for blessings, dealing with cases of doubt, rules of saying “amen,” saying blessings on behalf of others, the proper sequence of blessings, and the criteria for which a blessing said on one item can exempt another item.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (10/20).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe and analyze complex practices, principles, customs and laws pertaining to Jewish blessings; and apply halachic principles of brachos to various situations and circumstances.

Instruction:

Advanced Studies of Blessings II (JST-320) is a self-study course that culminates in a final examination. Students will be able to demonstrate that they have the requisite knowledge and skills to apply halachic principles of brachos to various situations and analyze what rules come into play in any given scenario. Topics will include the halachic ramifications of leaving the place of the meal or deciding to end the meal, determining what is considered the main part of a mixture, the definition of bread, pas haba b’kisnin and when it is considered a meal, determination of bracha for berries, situations where fruits and vegetables do not receive their primary bracha, and the rules of what is included in the bracha of borei pri hagafen.  

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20). 

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: to identify the textual sources for Torah principles as found in Pirkei Avos; to show familiarity with the teachings of Pirkei Avos and the commentary of Rabbeinu Yonah; to apply the ethical principles of Pirkei Avos to various practical situations; to trace the transmission of the Torah; to recognize the relationship between the ethical teachings of Pirkei Avos and proper interpersonal relations; and to understand the beliefs of reward and punishment according to the sages of Pirkei Avos.

Instruction:

Ethics of the Fathers I (ETH-340) is examines the ethical messages and teachings of the first three chapters of Tractate Avos along with the essential comments and teachings of Rabbeinu Yonah of Gerona in his commentary on those chapters. Students should know Rabbeinu Yonah’s explanations of the words of the mishnah and the concepts he derives from the mishnah. Concepts in this course involve understanding the transmission of tradition, good character traits, proper interpersonal relations, reward and punishment, and pure service of G-d.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Studies, Philosophy, History, Ethics, or Education (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: to identify the textual sources for Torah principles as found in Pirkei Avos; to show familiarity with the teachings of Pirkei Avos and the commentary of Rabbeinu Yonah; to apply the ethical principles of Pirkei Avos to various practical situations; to elaborate the attitudes towards wisdom and how to attain it as expressed in Pirkei Avos; to recognize the relationship between the ethical teachings of Pirkei Avos and proper interpersonal relations; and to understand the beliefs of reward and punishment according to the sages of Pirkei Avos.

Instruction:

Ethics of the Fathers II (ETH-345) is a course which examines the ethical messages and teachings of the last three chapters of Tractate Avos along with the essential comments and teachings of Rabbeinu Yonah of Gerona in his commentary on those chapters. Students should know Rabbeinu Yonah’s explanations of the words of the mishnah and the concepts he derives from the mishnah. Concepts addressed in this course involve defining a Torah value system, ethical character traits, ethical attitudes towards Torah study, how to successfully pursue wisdom, and reward and punishment.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Studies, Philosophy, History, Ethics, or Education (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain why the Sages of the Talmud viewed financial self-sufficiency as a crucial value; assess and prioritize competing values in the area of money and wealth according to rabbinic scholarship; describe the relationship between trust in G-d and pursuit of livelihood; identify varying aspects of financial planning and their significance within the framework of Torah money ethics; evaluate various career options and their suitability according to Torah ethical teaching; evaluate how financial matters impact on a person’s character; identify the dangers of both poverty and wealth; and discern how financial life is replete with mitzvos and Divine guidance.

Instruction:

Ethics of Wealth (ETH-400) is a course which explores Torah values and ethics regarding money, wealth and work. Utilizing traditional sources from the Bible, Talmud, and their classic commentaries as well later rabbinic sources, the course will consider topics such as financial self-sufficiency and its significance, financial planning and investing, as well as vocational and professional options for employment. It will also examine how issues relating to money play a role in mitzvah observance and personal character.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Studies, Philosophy, History, Ethics, or Education (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study). 

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify artistic motivations and key features of Jewish art of Antiquity; trace the development of popular motifs in Jewish art; compare and contrast Jewish art of Antiquity from different places; compare and contrast Jewish art of Late Antiquity with that of nearby cultures; identify strengths and weaknesses of various theories of art interpretation as they apply to Jewish art of Antiquity; explain changes in Jewish art from the Second Temple period through the end of Late Antiquity; analyze Jewish art of Antiquity from multiple perspectives, including political, social, and religious; and apply rabbinic sources to questions of Jewish art.

Instruction:

Jewish Art of Antiquity examines visual Judaism from the time of the settlement of the Jewish people in the Land of Israel, including major emphasis on Late Antiquity, including the major archaeological finds from that period in both Israel and the Diaspora and their significance, a variety of interpretations of these pieces and the debates over various theories of interpretation, social, political, and religious contexts, and comparisons between different works from the period. Special attention is given to the rabbinic view on art and specific types of art, and what level of influence the rabbis may have had over the producers of the art in this period.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Art, Biblical Studies, History, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religious Studies (6/17).

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply the theories they have learned in the area of Jewish blessings and will assess basic concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze the underlying premises of the principal laws and customs; and apply them to varied and novel situations. 

Instruction:

This is a distance learning course that covers blessing structure, blessings made in vain, the response of amen, discharging the obligation of others, initial blessings, sequence of blessings, principle versus subsidiary items, the status of staple foods, and the use of the general blessing of shehakol (the blessing recited over any food or drink that does not fall into a higher category of blessing).

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Anthropology, Judaic Studies, Sociology, or Religion (11/20).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the essential components of traditional Jewish music; compare and contrast Jewish music to the music of other ethnic groups amongst whom Jews have lived; link various trends in Jewish music to common roots; describe the theological and philosophical background to Jewish musical tendencies; compare and contrast the synagogue and folk music of different Jewish communities; apply knowledge of Jewish music to understand the historical underpinnings of any given piece of music; identify the changes that have occurred to Jewish music throughout the years and trace their sources; and provide historical background for the state of Jewish music today.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the music of the Orthodox Jew from antiquity through the end of the twentieth century, including the instruments known from the First and Second Temple and how they were used, the history of synagogue music for prayer and cantillation of the Bible and traces the development of the art of chazzanus and the folk song, numerous Jewish cultures, both Ashkenazic and Sephardic, how Jewish music developed in different circumstances and how the music of the Orthodox community became what it is today.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Music, Jewish History, or History of Music (6/17).

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