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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Communications - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the ethical and moral issues involved in communication, and are expected to know the sources, conceptual underpinnings, and conclusions that dictate ethical communication in interpersonal relationships.  Using theoretical knowledge, students will be able to assess types of language and situations to determine the appropriate ethical response for all parties involved.

Instruction:

The distance learning course explores the ethical, philosophical, and practical issues involved in interpersonal communications. Topics include libel, slander, rebuke, innuendo, the Biblical sources for ethical communication, the problem of listening to disparaging speech, repercussions for unethical speech, speaking about others in the workplace, and guidelines for ethically eliciting negative speech for a valid benefit. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Philosophy or Ethics. (11/20)

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the ethical and moral issues involved in communication, and are expected to know the sources, conceptual underpinnings, and conclusions that dictate ethical communication in interpersonal relationships.  Using theoretical knowledge, students will be able to assess types of language and situations to determine the appropriate ethical response for all parties involved.

Instruction:

This distance learning course covers the ethical, philosophical, and practical issues involved in interpersonal communications. Topics include tale bearing, gossip, slander, rebuke, implicating others for wrongdoing, defending oneself from accusations, the question of intent, ambiguous comments, and deprecating speech for a positive purpose.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Philosophy, Communications, Business Law, or Judaic Studies. (11/20)

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explore the field of nonverbal communication from a "communication" perspective; examine the key issues, theories, and research findings related to the nature, functions, and development of nonverbal communication; contrast the importance of four basic nonverbal signaling systems: the human body, approached-avoidance signals of space, gaze and touch; facial expressions; and the overlapping channels of voice and gesture; and apply nonverbal communication to everyday encounters, including intimate work and intercultural.

Instruction:

Nonverbal Communication (COM-201)  allows students to analyze the effects of nonverbal communication on human interaction. Students use the major theoretical approaches of nonverbal communication and explain how they relate to nonverbal behaviors such as touch, time, environmental contents, physical appearance, and social communication cues and explore how nonverbal communication and everyday encounters intersect to improve communication outcomes.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Speech Communications, Business Communications, Education, Human Resources, Management or Marketing (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the major theories associated with the study of small group communication; determine how individual roles are filled in small groups; compare strategies in group communication that facilitate the achievement of group goals; develop skills in understanding, analyzing, and evaluating small group experiences; identify barriers to effective small group communication; and apply small group communication knowledge for group problem solving scenarios in case studies.  Students will have the opportunity to acquire the necessary skills to communicate effectively in a variety of group settings upon completion of this course.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an understanding of the principles of small group communication.  Students learn the theory and current research on group communication as well as the challenges of communicating in groups and explore the foundations of small group communication (verbal and nonverbal elements and listening), the development of the group, and the challenges that small groups face due to diversity and internal conflicts.  Critical thinking skills are developed by analyzing how groups are formed, group problem-solving techniques, conflict resolution, and ultimately applying practical leadership principles with the group dynamic.  Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communications, Human Resources, Marketing, Education, Management, Project Management, or as an Elective in Business (4/19).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss terms, concepts, and theories related to intercultural communication; describe the impact that religion, class, gender, race, education, and ethnicity have on communication and interpersonal interactions; examine the elements of intercultural communication competence; analyze potential barriers to intercultural communication; compare different cultural dimensions and values (i.e. power distance, individualism, uncertainty avoidance, etc. of different populations and groups); and evaluate specific intercultural communication problems, illustrating the historical, cultural, economic, and political differences that have an impact on their solutions.

Instruction:

This course introduces students to cross-cultural communication processes.  Case studies accompany each chapter so students can apply theoretical concepts to “real life” scenarios. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communication, International Marketing, Journalism, Media Studies, or as an elective in Business (4/19).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the historical development of mass communication and explore the changing influence of media or individuals and society; assess the impact of technological innovations on social interaction, political processes, public relations, advertising, gaming and other media industries; compare different theoretical approaches to the study of technology; predict how mediated communication will affect careers in a variety of disciplines including business, entertainment, health, politics, advertising and education; interpret media policy, law, and ethics; and research careers in communications.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an understanding of the field of communications, from newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, firms, and cable, to the newer and interactive media of the digital present. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communication, Business, Journalism, Marketing, or Media Studies (4/19).

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