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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Mathematics - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: use mathematical notations and expressions to represent variables and write algebraic expressions and equations; solve algebraic equations, including linear, quadratic, polynomials, roots, and rational functions; graph a mathematical function and apply basic transformations to the graph and corresponding equation; work with and manipulate exponential and logarithmic expressions; solve systems of linear and basic nonlinear equations and find solution sets of systems for inequalities; recognize equations that represent conic sections such as circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and parabolas from mathematic equations and their graphic representations.
Instruction:
This self-study course is designed to provide students with the basic principles of algebra, including mathematical expressions such as polynomials, exponentials, and logarithms and their manipulations. The course also covers functions, graphs, inequalities, linear equations and quadratic equations and their solutions through algebra and graphing.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Algebra or Mathematics (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:
November 2014 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: solve real life problems using geometry; identify geometric shapes and characteristics of angles, lines, and shapes; determine whether a geometric figure is congruent and/or similar to another given figure and explain the reasons for such conclusion; calculate the perimeter, area, and volume of a variety of geometric figures; apply the rules of geometry of a circle and properties of lines and angles that run through one or more points on the circle's circumference; plot points, lines, and geometric figures on a graph and use coordinate geometry rules to identify properties of these points, lines, and figures.
Instruction:

This self-study course is designed to provide students with the basic principles of geometry necessary for further college-level mathematics through textbook reading assignments, optional homework assignments, study guide, and both written and video lessons. Major topics include: properties of geometric shapes and measurements, calculating the dimensions, including one, two, and three-dimensional properties of geometric figures. Students discuss concepts such as similarity and congruency, geometric proofs establishing relationships between figures, characteristics of triangles, quadrilaterials, higher order polygons, circles, three dimensional figures and properties of the sides and angles appurtenant to these figures, and graphing and coordinate geometry.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Geometry, Mathematics, or as a general elective (11/14).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: convert realistic situations into mathematical concepts so that mathematical tools can be used to solve them; use Venn diagrams, graphs, charts and similar methods to represent, organize and analyze data; apply principles of logic to prove or disprove statements (both in text and in mathematical form) on the basis of other given statements; identify, manipulate and utilize mathematical expressions including rational, irrational and imaginary numbers, along with mathematical expressions such as absolute value, inequalities and radicals; use principles of algebra and geometry to identify variables and express algebraic expressions on graphs; determine the probability of a specified event or condition or series of events or conditions; and apply principles of statistics, such as averages, normal distributions and standard deviations to identify statistically significant data.

Instruction:

This exam is designed to develop students’ mathematic thinking and reasoning skills though problem-solving. The exam surveys many of the tools in the mathematical toolbox, including concepts in data sets, number systems, algebra, geometry, logic, graphing, probability and statistics. At each stage, students are expected to apply these tools to analytically solve problems. Familiarity with the basics of arithmetic, algebra and geometry is assumed, though the relevant concepts are reviewed where appropriate. Prerequisites: College Algebra and College Geometry or demonstrable skills in those areas, such as superior scores on standardized tests in those areas.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Math, Business, Finance, or as a general elective (6/17).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: classify collected data to ensure efficient statistical analysis; graph data on various types of charts and graphs to display distribution tendency, variation, etc; determine the probability of the occurrence of an event based on a variety of data types; apply conditional probability rules, including the addition rule; use probability distributions to model the number of successes in various sample sizes; calculate standard distributions and confidence intervals for sets of data; use statistical analyses to test hypotheses for small and large samples; and perform basic regression analyses.
Instruction:

This self-study course provides students with a working knowledge of the most important basic concepts of probability and statistics by teaching methods of how data is sorted, characterized, visualized, and interpreted. Students discuss important probability concepts such as events, sample spaces, conditional probability, and effects of multiple variables. Other topics include: statistical distribution, sample sizes, testing, regression analysis and complex statistical analysis.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Statistics or Mathematics (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

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