Skip to main content

National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Psychology and Sociology - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Psychology and Sociology - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and intensive knowledge of Jewish food practices from Biblical times through present day, inclusive of Ashekenazic and Sephardic customs as well as current American and Israeli food; explain the religious and symbolic reasons for special festival foods, unique weekday foods, and food taboos; compare and contrast the differences between Jewish cultures and reasons for food variety; identify patterns in factors that affect Jewish food choices; and discuss various definitions and opinions of what is considered Jewish food.

Instruction:
This self-study course assess students' knowledge of the social history of Jewish food, including Biblical and Talmudic concepts and rules of food and customs that have been adopted over the centuries in Jewish settlements in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and more recently in the United States and Israel. Major topics include: how foods are used for ritual and festival purposes, how Jews played a role in spreading foods to other cultures, and modern attitudes of Jews toward different types of cuisine and different reasons for their food choices and the respective sociologically significance.
Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Religion, Nutritional Science, or as General Elective (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Length:

Varies (self-study;self-paced).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the development of abnormal psychology, assessment and diagnosis approach, and research methods; analyze the symptoms, prevalence, causes, and treatments for disorders related to anxiety, somatic, mood/suicide, and eating; discuss the impact of psychology on physical health, symptoms, prevalence, causes, and treatments for sexual addiction, impulse control, and personality and schizophrenia-related disorders; investigate neuro-developmental and neuro-cognitive disorders and the legal and ethical issues associated with mental health service provision.

Instruction:

This self-study course explores the prevalence, symptoms, causes, and treatments related to major psychological disorders, including: anxiety, somatics, mood, eating, sleep cycle, stress, sexual, addiction, personality, and schizophrenia-related disorders. Other topics include: historical developments, assessment and diagnostic approaches, and research methods in the discipline, along with current legal and ethical perspectives. Detailed case studies and concept checks help students examine and apply what they have learned. Unit objectives are aligned with the American Psychological Association's Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (Version 2.0, August 2013).

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education programs (12/14) (1/20 revalidation). 

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: assess the fundamental aspects of active listening; examine challenges distorted by negative automatic beliefs; identify how to build active listening skills to persuade others; explore the process of responding to emotionally charged nonverbal cues; describe what nonverbal communication is and how to decode it; examine the connection between nonverbal communication and the limbic brain; discuss the nonverbals of the torso, hips, abdomen, chest, and shoulders; identify how hand behavior is crucial to decoding nonverbal behaviors; and investigate the difficulties in accurately assessing deceptive behaviors.

Instruction:

Active Learning and Body Language (PSY-400) introduces students to the principles of active listening and body language. The student will hone the skill of active listening and discover the importance of paraphrasing, emotional labeling, and validation. The students will learn techniques that will allow them to navigate difficult and emotionally charged situation. The student will learn about the use of nonverbals to establish trust, communicate authority and reveal the true feelings and motives of others.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the benefits of animal-assisted interaction; evaluate therapeutic gains from assistance dogs; discuss the implications of animals serving as protective factors for community health; explore the role of a dog for all involved in animal-assisted intervention(AAI) (the practitioner, handler, and client); examine the factors that make pets a good candidate for AAI; explore how animals may be incorporated into psychotherapy or mental health practice; examine the factors when working with animals for individuals with autism spectrum and executive functioning disorders; examine the factors of human– animal interaction with healing trauma and family issues; investigate programs and initiatives that have been developed globally in the field of animal-assisted intervention (analyze some problems with existing research on the use of Human-Animal Interaction (HAI) in therapeutic situations.

Instruction:

Animal-Assisted Therapy (PSY-475) introduces students to the benefits of animal assisted therapy. Students will learn about Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) and the applications to several populations that include children, trauma, and families. Students also learn how to use AAT for treating a variety of specific disorders. Finally, the student will examine the research, guidelines, and best practices for using animals as therapeutic companions.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, or Counseling (2/22).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: explore symbolism and art therapy; explain the relational aesthetics of artwork; discuss the use of sublimation and art therapy; examine the history of Jungian art therapy; identify the integrative multi-modal therapy within the confines of expressive arts therapy; investigate the factors in Focused-Oriented Art Therapy (FOAT); identify how cognitive behavior therapy CBT) principles and art therapy intersect; investigate the principle of Art Therapy Relational Neuroscience; explore the development of family art therapy; examine the various perspectives that create developmental art therapy; and explore multi-sensory activities by using all creative modalities.

Instruction:

Approaches to Art Therapy (PSY-420) introduces students to the approaches to art therapy. Students will study the varied theoretical approaches and the translation of theories to techniques. Students will also learn about a variety of topics including contemplative approaches, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), neuroscience, and mentalization while also retaining important and timeless contributions from the pioneers of art therapy. Student will examine clinical case examples and illustration of patient artwork that demonstrates the techniques in practice.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, or Counseling (2/22).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the theoretical perspectives of child development; explain the influences of genes and the environmental factors in development; compare different birthing procedures and the describe the choices that are available to parents; analyze the developmental norms of an infant and child and how to interpret them; summarize how attachment affects an individual’s social competence; investigate the ways that preschool children are educated; describe the ways children grow during the school years and the factors that influence their growth; list the types of relationships and friendships that are typical of middle childhood; and analyze the factors that affect adolescent school performance during school transition times.

Instruction:

This course provides a chronological overview of the field of child and adolescent development, from childhood to adolescence encompassing the prenatal period, infancy and toddlerhood, the preschool years, middle childhood, and adolescence. Within these periods, instruction focuses on physical, cognitive, and social and personality development.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/18).

Length:

: Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze the factors contributing to attitudes about death; apply psychology’s four goals to explain how people have confronted death and dying throughout History; identify the societal systems that contribute to death; explore the hospital system related to death and dying; explain the factors in relationship satisfaction and stability; explore different coping models for death; analyze end-of-life decisions experienced in other cultures; examine different therapy options for life-threatening diseases; identify the dying experiences of children and adolescents; examine the predominant factors responsible for suicide among youth and adults; explain factors responsible for deaths from accidents and violence; summarize common themes associated with near-death experiences; and examine the role of personal choice in embracing life.

Instruction:

Death and Dying (PSY-490) introduces students to death, dying, bereavement, and afterlife beliefs. Students explore the models of death and identify the factors of suicide and death related to violence and war and analyze life ending decisions and the impacts of near-death experiences.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Psychology, or Health (2/22). 

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the skills that make a good teacher and how to evaluate an intentional teacher; break down how children develop cognitively, socially and emotionally; examine the impact of culture on teaching and learning; analyze the principles of behavioral and cognitive learning; determine how direct instruction, student-centered and constructivist approaches to instruction influence intentional teaching;  discuss the elements of effective instruction; investigate motivation for student performance; illustrate the characteristics of effective learning environments; identify learners with exceptionalities; and assess student learning through standardized tests.

Instruction:

This course provides a systematic study of learners, learning, and teaching and emphasizes cognitive, social and moral development while also focusing on educational diversity. Instruction also focuses on motivating students to learn, creating effective learning environments, and assessing student learning.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education or Psychology (8/18).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: identify core concepts, theories, and perspectives in the study of environmental sociology; critically analyze the reciprocal relationship between human society and the natural environment; critically view and analyze environmental problems associated within contemporary society; and discuss changes in the natural environment through a sociological perspective.

Instruction:

Environmental Sociology (SOC-345) is designed to introduce students to the sub-discipline of environmental sociology. Throughout the semester, students explore the interactions between the natural and the human-built environment and discuss factors of human society that have caused the degradation of ecological systems. In order to understand contemporary environmental problems, students must critically look at the values and priorities of a society that drive human actions. Other topics include exploring how social movements have emerged in response to environmental degradation as well as motivations and measures individuals, groups, and nations can curb and/or prevent further environmental degradation.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: investigate the violence against women from around the world; differentiate the four major types of violence that occurs in families; scrutinize the primary areas of child maltreatment: neglect, physical and sexual; distinguish the forms of sexual offending against minors; assess the health and safety issues that affects the survivors of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); recognize how violence occurring in the LBGTI relationship is unique to the population; identify the characteristics of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); investigate the categories of homicide in relation to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); scrutinize the concepts and provisions of domestic violence orders of protection.

Instruction:

Family & Partnership Violence (PSY-385)  introduces students to the crimes of family violence, covering offenders and offenses, impact on victims, and responses of the criminal justice system. The student will learn about adolescent and young adult victimization, as well as intimate partner violence, LGBTI population, and theoretical perspectives.

Top