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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Psychology and Sociology - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Psychology and Sociology - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and intensive knowledge of Jewish food practices from Biblical times through present day, inclusive of Ashekenazic and Sephardic customs as well as current American and Israeli food; explain the religious and symbolic reasons for special festival foods, unique weekday foods, and food taboos; compare and contrast the differences between Jewish cultures and reasons for food variety; identify patterns in factors that affect Jewish food choices; and discuss various definitions and opinions of what is considered Jewish food.

Instruction:
This self-study course assess students' knowledge of the social history of Jewish food, including Biblical and Talmudic concepts and rules of food and customs that have been adopted over the centuries in Jewish settlements in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and more recently in the United States and Israel. Major topics include: how foods are used for ritual and festival purposes, how Jews played a role in spreading foods to other cultures, and modern attitudes of Jews toward different types of cuisine and different reasons for their food choices and the respective sociologically significance.
Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Religion, Nutritional Science, or as General Elective (6/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Length:

Varies (self-study;self-paced).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the development of abnormal psychology, assessment and diagnosis approach, and research methods; analyze the symptoms, prevalence, causes, and treatments for disorders related to anxiety, somatic, mood/suicide, and eating; discuss the impact of psychology on physical health, symptoms, prevalence, causes, and treatments for sexual addiction, impulse control, and personality and schizophrenia-related disorders; investigate neuro-developmental and neuro-cognitive disorders and the legal and ethical issues associated with mental health service provision.

Instruction:

This self-study course explores the prevalence, symptoms, causes, and treatments related to major psychological disorders, including: anxiety, somatics, mood, eating, sleep cycle, stress, sexual, addiction, personality, and schizophrenia-related disorders. Other topics include: historical developments, assessment and diagnostic approaches, and research methods in the discipline, along with current legal and ethical perspectives. Detailed case studies and concept checks help students examine and apply what they have learned. Unit objectives are aligned with the American Psychological Association's Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (Version 2.0, August 2013).

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education programs (12/14) (1/20 revalidation). 

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: assess the fundamental aspects of active listening; examine challenges distorted by negative automatic beliefs; identify how to build active listening skills to persuade others; explore the process of responding to emotionally charged nonverbal cues; describe what nonverbal communication is and how to decode it; examine the connection between nonverbal communication and the limbic brain; discuss the nonverbals of the torso, hips, abdomen, chest, and shoulders; identify how hand behavior is crucial to decoding nonverbal behaviors; and investigate the difficulties in accurately assessing deceptive behaviors.

Instruction:

Active Learning and Body Language (PSY-400) introduces students to the principles of active listening and body language. The student will hone the skill of active listening and discover the importance of paraphrasing, emotional labeling, and validation. The students will learn techniques that will allow them to navigate difficult and emotionally charged situation. The student will learn about the use of nonverbals to establish trust, communicate authority and reveal the true feelings and motives of others.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the theoretical perspectives of child development; explain the influences of genes and the environmental factors in development; compare different birthing procedures and the describe the choices that are available to parents; analyze the developmental norms of an infant and child and how to interpret them; summarize how attachment affects an individual’s social competence; investigate the ways that preschool children are educated; describe the ways children grow during the school years and the factors that influence their growth; list the types of relationships and friendships that are typical of middle childhood; and analyze the factors that affect adolescent school performance during school transition times.

Instruction:

This course provides a chronological overview of the field of child and adolescent development, from childhood to adolescence encompassing the prenatal period, infancy and toddlerhood, the preschool years, middle childhood, and adolescence. Within these periods, instruction focuses on physical, cognitive, and social and personality development.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/18).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the skills that make a good teacher and how to evaluate an intentional teacher; break down how children develop cognitively, socially and emotionally; examine the impact of culture on teaching and learning; analyze the principles of behavioral and cognitive learning; determine how direct instruction, student-centered and constructivist approaches to instruction influence intentional teaching;  discuss the elements of effective instruction; investigate motivation for student performance; illustrate the characteristics of effective learning environments; identify learners with exceptionalities; and assess student learning through standardized tests.

Instruction:

This course provides a systematic study of learners, learning, and teaching and emphasizes cognitive, social and moral development while also focusing on educational diversity. Instruction also focuses on motivating students to learn, creating effective learning environments, and assessing student learning.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education or Psychology (8/18).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: investigate the violence against women from around the world; differentiate the four major types of violence that occurs in families; scrutinize the primary areas of child maltreatment: neglect, physical and sexual; distinguish the forms of sexual offending against minors; assess the health and safety issues that affects the survivors of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); recognize how violence occurring in the LBGTI relationship is unique to the population; identify the characteristics of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); investigate the categories of homicide in relation to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); scrutinize the concepts and provisions of domestic violence orders of protection.

Instruction:

Family & Partnership Violence (PSY-385)  introduces students to the crimes of family violence, covering offenders and offenses, impact on victims, and responses of the criminal justice system. The student will learn about adolescent and young adult victimization, as well as intimate partner violence, LGBTI population, and theoretical perspectives.

Length:

Varies (self study, self-paced). 

Dates:

December 2019 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: trace the history of psychological testing; identify the professional practice standards of associations and societies most relevant to psychological testing; evaluate different levels of measurement and the procedures for interpreting test scores; discuss the concept of a construct; examine the scientific approach to constructing, administering and using survey data; investigate how to develop and assess a test; and investigate using tests in educational, clinical, counseling and workplace settings.

Instruction:

This course introduces students to the basics of psychological testing as well as psychometrics and statistics. The material focuses on the foundational concepts and issues using real-life examples and situations. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Psychological Testing (1/20).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: distinguish how stress affects people physically, emotionally, mentally, spiritually, and socially; judge the capacity for handling the demands that are part of today's world; practice how to prevent stress; discover how to reduce or cope successfully with unavoidable stress; appraise several different measures to assess personal stress; deduce that the body is designed to respond to acute stress predictably for one outcome-survival; evaluate the skills of “managing self-talk”, “stopping negative thoughts”, and “going with the flow” as mental tools to help prevent the activation of the stress response; assess values clarification to facilitate self-understanding; discover how to spend and save money to bring a lifetime of financial freedom; examine personal spiritual health; incorporate the behaviors of proper exercise, eating right, adequate sleep, and avoiding unhealthy behaviors to form a foundation of stress management; probe complementary and alternative therapies to expand roles in stress management and health promotion; formulate a plan that addresses a specific personality and the situations that determine the most effective tools to deal with stress.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an understanding of stress management and prevention. Using an experiential approach; this course encourages the student to personalize the information through practical applications and stress-reducing resources that includes activities and assessments. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Health Studies, Human Development, or Social Sciences (4/19).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: investigate sociological and gerontological perspectives on aging; analyze the impact of an “aging” society through data analysis of demographic patterns and historical factors; compare sociological concepts and theories of aging through practical application; appraise cultural awareness of the aging population; evaluate conclusions from aging research through effective oral and written communication; and analyze and evaluate research related to aging.

Instruction:

This course provides students with the ability to explore the social aspects of aging and how aging impacts individuals as well as communities, nations, and the world. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Health Studies, Human Development, or Social Sciences (4/19).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how the history of psychology is studied, its philosophical influences, its physiological influences, and the contributions of its founders; explain the theoretical tenets and empirical methods of structuralism, functionalism and applied psychology; investigate the theory and methods used in Behaviorism and Gestalt Psychology; discuss the contributions of psychoanalytic and humanistic theory and method and the contemporary developments in psychology; and evaluate the relative merits of psychology's major schools of thought and key studies in the history of psychology.

Instruction:

This self-study course explores the history of psychology and major schools of thought. From the Greek philosophers to the contributions of modern schools of thought such as evolutionary psychology, students explore important theoretical and methodological movements in psychology such as structuralism, functionalism, applied psychology, behaviorism, and psychoanalysis. Students evaluate the relative merits of each of psychology's approaches and deepen their knowledge of game-changing studies in the field. The unit objectives are aligned with the American Psychological Association's Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (Version 2.0, August, 2013).

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education (12/14) (1/20 revalidation).

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