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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Counseling and Social Work - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the historical development and theories of career development; compare the five career counseling models; describe the use of standardized tests and self-assessment procedures in career counseling; identify the ethical issues that a career counselor faces; describe the methods of career counseling for multicultural groups; analyze issues that arise when working with gender issues and dual careers; describe the hardships associated with job loss and transitions; analyze the career development and transition needs of working adults; and explain the facets of career-related programs for career development in elementary, middle and high schools.

Instruction:

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of the theoretical models of career counseling and practical techniques on how to counsel clients about career issues. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Counseling, Educational Studies, Human Services, Social Sciences, or Psychology (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the effects of drug use in modern society; analyze how drugs work on the nervous system and the actions of drugs; investigate stimulants, depressants and what drugs are used for mental disorders; analyze aspects of alcohol from the distillation of it to the use and dependence on it; list and describe drugs that are commonly used, including tobacco, caffeine, dietary supplements and over-the-counter drugs; analyze opioids and describe the current epidemic that is a nationwide issue; compare substance abuse prevention programs; and critically analyze drug policy and analyze what works, what is possible and what is feasible.

Instruction:

This course explores the history and current information on drugs and their effects on society and human behaviors. Major topics include: drug use in modern society, how drugs work and detailed information on alcohol, stimulants, depressants as well as information on restricted drugs and familiar drugs, prevention programs and challenges the rethinking of drug policies and drug decriminalization.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Sciences, Social Work, Health Studies, or as an elective in Psychology (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the social context of family therapy; analyze the circumstances that led to the development of family therapy; list the founders and their theories of family therapy; analyze the basic techniques for the different therapy styles; compare the foundational therapies of cybernetics, system theory, social constructionism and attachment theory; investigate the classic schools of family therapy: Bowen, strategic, structural, experiential, psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavioral family therapy; describe the recent developments in family therapy; compare and contrast the views of different models in family development; analyze the gap between clinical practice and scientific research for a basic understanding of the methods family researchers use to empirically test their ideas.

Instruction:

This course explores the history and contemporary practice of the family therapy field and emphasizes ideas and techniques with a clear focus on clinical practice. This course also encourages students to explore the history, the classic schools, and the latest developments in the field.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Sciences, Social Work, Psychology, or Counseling (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: evaluate tools to work in various settings with a variety of client groups; describe the historical and the current use of groups in social work practice; assess and apply group properties and group processes that occur in a group; investigate the basic techniques for working with diversity in groups; compile the elements to plan for, begin, and conduct a group; compare group processes to achieve the goals and objectives of the group; evaluate the outcome of a group and to use the information to improve group practice; and compare resources available to plan for and establish specific treatment and task groups.

Instruction:

This course explores the skills necessary for group work practice. It emphasizes basic theory about groups and group process, demonstrates necessary skills for effective practice and focuses on the practice of these skills; and examines techniques to deal with the challenges of diversity in groups.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Sciences, Social Work, Addiction Counseling, Psychology, Mental Health, or Counseling (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the role of the mental health professional in prevention and treatment of substance abuse; describe drug classification; compare the models of addiction; analyze the concerns when working with culturally and ethnically diverse populations; investigate the issues of maintaining confidentiality and ethical standards; analyze the methods for screening, assessing and diagnosing a client; list the elements for motivational interviewing and brief interventions; analyze the basic techniques for the treatment of alcohol and other drugs; describe the relapse prevention and recovery process; compare twelve-step programs and other types of support groups; and explain the impacts that alcohol and drugs have on children, families, adult children and codependency.

Instruction:

This course provides a comprehensive coverage of alcohol and other drug prevention, treatment, and recovery for the alcohol and other drug field. Major topics include: cultural competence, assessment, models of prevention, co-occurring disorders, other behavioral addictions, children and families, and ethics and confidentiality.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Services, Social Sciences, Social Work, Counseling, Addiction Studies, or Psychology (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze the principles of the therapeutic relationship and how a therapeutic alliance is formed; ascertain the motivation of a client who enters treatment; identify the elements of conversational skills necessary for joining and maintaining an interview; describe reflecting skills that explore the content, feelings and meanings of the client's story; identify questions and goal setting skills necessary for an effective therapeutic interview; analyze the principles of summarizing and terminating therapy sessions; investigate common mistakes that can lead to ineffective therapy; examine the intake, mental status exam and crisis counseling aspects of the therapeutic assessment interview; determine the skills needed for conducting a therapeutic interview with children, couples, families and groups; and compare the context of interviewing at the therapist's office to the client's home to alternative settings.

Instruction:

This course covers general principles of effective interviewing and provides students with foundational strategies, skills, and tools of therapeutic interviewing along with an understanding of the formats and settings in which they will be working.  Instruction also focuses on equipping novice therapists with a basic understanding of interviewing and explores how they can develop the skills to become competent therapists.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Sciences, Social Work, Addiction Counseling, Psychology, Mental Health, or Counseling (8/18).

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