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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Computer and Technology - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: incorporate Photoshop as a tool for designing interfaces for websites, webpages, etc.; design using the Photoshop workspace; identify the components of the software screens, including windows, menus, and controls; design and organize interfaces to encourage the fastest and most accurate comprehension and execution of screen features; choose screen colors and design screen icons and graphics; and perform the user interface to include dynamic features such as text and animation. 

Instruction:

This course provides a foundation for designing functional Web pages and applications utilizing Photoshop to design an engaging interface using techniques provided using this software. Topics include general project guidelines, the use of Photoshop’s workspace to create appropriate interfaces, the various features/tools in the software, adding photos and custom shapes, creating files in portable formats, techniques used in designing dynamic interfaces used in industry, human factors and accessible websites, as well as copyright issues.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design (12/14) (1/20 revalidation). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the function and purpose of computer hardware components and important application software; evaluate major operating systems; illustrate the major telecommunications alternatives and evaluate their suitability for a given task; compare and contrast Local Area Networks and Wide Area Networks; propose and evaluate solutions to data communication problems; and distinguish between the important programming languages and choose the correct computer language for the specific job.

Instruction:

Introduction to Computers (CIS-101) introduces students to the principles of information processing and computers. Students differentiate between the concepts of hardware and software and their uses in information systems. Instruction traces the development of computers from their historical background to modern times and the role computers have in modern society. Special focus is given to computer operations and systems and terminology.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Information Systems or Information Technology (6/17).

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain how data is represented in a computer; identify computer hardware and software; discuss computer networks; design, implement and execute algorithms; explain social, ethical and legal issues arising from the use of computers; discuss future uses of computers; discuss computer usage in interdisciplinary fields; list and explain software applications such as electronic spreadsheets and databases; use a web browser to search the Internet; use computer terminology in written documents and oral communication; use computer etiquette in electronic communications; and use communication tools effectively.

Instruction:

This self-study course provides a broad introduction to the use of computers as tools for creativity, communications, organizing information, and problem-solving. Major topics include: basic concepts of computer hardware, software, networking, and the Internet, organization of a typical Personal Computer (PC) in a given popular operating systems environment, terminology and concepts related to major PC hardware components and their functions, typical user interface of popular operating systems, current state, trends, and challenges of various aspects of computing: computer hardware and software, and programming languages.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design (12/14) (1/20 revalidation). 

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self study; self-paced).

Dates:

January 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: trace the development of HTML and describe the transition from HTML to XHTML syntax, elements, and document type definitions; develop client-side intensive web pages using HTML5; create basic HTML elements such as hyperlinks, images, tables, and forms; use latest web technologies and programming languages to structure a web page effectively; demonstrate recommended web site design practices; control the look and placement of HTML elements using Cascading Style Sheets; compare and contrast HTML relative hyperlinks, linking to fragment identifiers, CSS pseudo-classes, navigation list layout, three-column layout, styling for print, styling for the mobile Web, and Cascading Style Sheets; demonstrate knowledge of box properties and external style sheets; create HTML source code that is both readable and upholds HTML5 standards; compare and contrast user interactions between desktop web, mobile application, and mobile web; Work with Forms on web pages; discuss the system development life cycle and its application to Web development projects. 

Instruction:

This self-study course introduces students to the principles of how to create a website from scratch using HTML5 (the latest HTML standard) and CSS3, (the latest CSS standard). The course begins with an overview of web development before delving into the structure of HTML and XHTML documents. By the end of this course, students will know how to code links, inputs, and comments in HTML; style and format content with CSS. This course is intended to acquaint students with the extended capabilities of HTML5, as well as the new philosophy of Web Design that it embodies. Specifically, with HTML5 it will be possible to develop web pages entirely with HTML5. There will be no need for “plug‐ins” to provide additional functionality. This course of study is necessary to be prepared for the final examination which consists of equal reading, lesson and video assignments. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design, Web Programming, or Internet Programming (1/15) (1/20 revalidation). 

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
July 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: create Access databases and populate them to relevant data; query databases by various criteria and create forms for queries; perform basic calculations and statistics within queries; maintain Access databases by updating records, filtering records, setting validation rules, changing the appearance of data sheets and making mass changes within databases; create reports and forms generated from information in Access databases; generate multi-table forms and manipulate these forms using various techniques; utilize advanced Access reporting techniques to manipulate Access reports and forms in a variety of ways; use Structured Query Language (SQL) to manage data relating to Access databases in a variety of ways.

Instruction:

This self-study course covers functions and features of Microsoft Access 2010. Students study database concepts and the Access environment and learn how to design and create databases. Major topics include: tables, fields, and records, sorting and filtering data, setting field properties and data entry rules, creating queries, forms, and reports.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various;distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
July 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: create worksheets and present them in different ways showing various fonts, styles, sizes, colors, etc.; use the power of Excel to automatically calculate mathematical data and apply it seamlessly to spreadsheets; copy cells and ranges of cells and perform other complex manipulations of spreadsheets, including adding charts, subtables, etc.; perform financial functions and data tables to produce amortization schedules and use Excel's formula checking function to minimize the possibility of error; create, sort, and query tables and the data within them; work with multiple worksheets and separate workbooks; and create templates by working with other features such as art, images, and screenshots to work these features into an Excel spreadsheet.

Instruction:

This self-study comprehensive course covers all the functions and features of Excel 2010 for students of any skill level. Major topics include: introduction to spreadsheet terminology, Excel's components, entering and editing text, values, formulas, and pictures, absolute and relative references, ranges, rows, and columns, advanced formatting options, lookup functions, data validation, database functions, and using simple and complex formulas to assist with calculations.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
July 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: create and edit PowerPoint presentations with a variety of elements; enhance presentations with pictures, shapes, clip art, etc.; add multimedia elements to improve the effectiveness of PowerPoint presentations; work information graphics into PowerPoint presentations; collaborate with others in preparing and delivering PowerPoint presentations; integrate PowerPoint presentations with elements linking them to other media by using hyperlinks and action buttons; and create self-running presentations containing animations.

Instruction:

This self-study course covers the most important functions and features of Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 for students of any skill level, beginning with an Introduction to PowerPoint's components. Major topics include: formatting slides, using graphics and multimedia, customizing Smart Art graphics and tables, modifying and distributing presentations, action buttons, custom slide shows and equations, and integrating Microsoft Office files.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13) (8/18 revalidation). 

Location:
Various; distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
July 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: create various types of documents through Microsoft Word; insert headers, footers, footnotes, endnotes, etc. into a word document to maximize the professional look of the document; produce and use templates, form letters, mailing labels, and directories; use Word features to collaborate on documents with co-workers; create and make changes to title pages, tables of contents, lists, letterheads, and various other in-document features; and create templates for online forms and enhance those forms using macros and other relevant features.

Instruction:

This self-study course familiarizes students with the Microsoft Word program and provides a variety of features available in the application as well as strategies to maximize productivity. By learning the essentials of the program, students learn how to produce, edit, format, view, display, and print documents such formal letters, business presentations, and research papers.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13) (8/18 revalidation). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

April 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: debug common errors in Python; define data types and analyze functions; examine conditional statements and the iterative process; manipulate strings and  lists and recognize mutable versus immutable data structures; access modules and import files; analyze classes and objects; implement recursive definitions and catch exceptions; and work with dictionaries and recognized advantages of inheritance.  

Instruction:

This 8-module course provides students with a working knowledge of concepts and programming techniques in Python. Topics include: debugging, data types, functions, conditionals, iteration, strings, lists, dictionaries, modules, filed, recursion, classes, and objects. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, Cyber Security, Information Technologies, or as an elective in Business or Mathematics (4/19).

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