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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Bible - Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate measurable higher-level thinking skill of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the first half of the Book of Exodus (chapters 1-17).  Included in this will be the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Exodus.  Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior.   Students will be able to do this analysis even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections. 

Instruction:

This distance learning course covers the first half of the Book of Exodus (chapter 1-17, consisting of Parshiyot Shemos through Beshalach) and selected commentaries of Rashi.  Topics include the birth and development of Moshe, Egyptian slavery, the ten plagues, the exodus, the korban pesach (the sacrifice slaughtered and eaten on the first eve of Passover) and other commandments given to remember the exodus, the splitting of the Red Sea, and the mann (food from heaven) and the quail which Bnei Yisrael (the Israelites) ate in the desert.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate measurable higher-level thinking skill of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the second half of the Book of Exodus (chapters 18-40).  Included in this will be the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Exodus.  Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior.   Students will be able to do this analysis even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections. 

Instruction:

This is a distance learning course that covers the second half of the Book of Exodus (chapters 18-40, consisting of Parshiot - Yisro through Pekudei) and selected commentaries of Rashi. Topics include the visit of Yisro, the giving of the Torah, the civil laws of Mishpatim, the construction of the mishkan (tabernacle), the sin of the golden calf, and the subsequent forgiveness.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: to identify the main references to women in the Pentateuch; to demonstrate knowledge of the interpretations of the midrash, rishonim, and ba’alei musar of incidents involving women in the Torah, and to identify the textual sources of these interpretations; to recognize laws of the Torah that apply specifically to women; to understand how contemporary female traditional Orthodox Torah teachers interpret laws of the Torah which apply to women in a manner relevant and understandable to contemporary women; to demonstrate how learning about the women of the Torah reveals universal truths about women, Jewish women, male/female relationships, and marriage; and to apply the lessons learned from women of the Torah to contemporary situations.

Instruction:

This learning experience seeks to bring deeper understanding of the main female characters of the Pentateuch and of numerous Torah laws pertaining specifically to women. The course will examine the relevance of the female characters as interpreted by the rabbis from the composers of the midrash through current times, as well as the lessons gleaned by contemporary female Torah teachers. A major focus will be the lessons learned from the women of the Torah as they apply to Jewish women today in daily life and spiritual growth. Some of the specific topics will include analysis of Chava, the Matriarchs, and Miriam. Laws examined will include family purity and divorce.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Bible Studies, Judaic Studies, Religion, Sociology, or Women’s Studies (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the first half of the Book of Genesis (1:1-25:18). Included in this will be the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Genesis. Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior. Students will be able to do this analysis even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections. 

Instruction:

This  self-study course  covers the first half of the Book of Genesis (1:1-25:18, consisting of Parshiot Breishis through Chayei Sarah) and selected commentaries of Rashi. Topics include the Creation, the exile from Eden, the first fratricide, the generations of the Great Flood and the Tower of Bavel, Abraham and Sarah and their relationship with G-d, the destruction of Sodom the binding of Isaac, and the selection of Rivkah.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the second half of the Book of Genesis (25:19-50:25).  Included in this will be the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Genesis. Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior. Students will be able to do this analysis even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections.

Instruction:

This  distance learning course covers the second half of the Book of Genesis (25:19-50:25), consisting of Parshiyot Toldos through Vayechi, and selected commentaries of Rashi.  Topics include the life of Yitzchak, the rivalry between Yaakov and Eisav, Yaakov’s experience with Lavan, the development of the 12 tribes, and Yosef as a leader in Egypt.

Credit recommendation:

In In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced). 

Dates:

November 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, Students will be able to demonstrate measurable higher-level thinking skill of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the first half of the Book of Leviticus.  Included in this is the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Leviticus. Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior.   Students will be able to identify the textual issue bothering Rashi even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections.  

Instruction:

This distance learning course covers the Book of Leviticus. The entire text of Leviticus and selected commentaries of Rashi are covered.  Although most of the exam is in English, students must be able to read and explain the Hebrew text.  Some of the main topics included are korbanos (offerings), the death of Nadav and Avihu, the Yom Kippur service, the kohen gadol (high priest), the laws of tzara’as (leprosy) and other types of impurity, kosher and non-kosher animals, the Jewish holidays, agricultural gifts for the poor, the sabbatical year and the jubilee year.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: to identify the main references to plants and trees in the Torah; to recognize the Torah prohibitions and commandments involving trees and plants; to understand the symbolism of trees in general and certain individual trees and plants according to rabbinical interpretation from the times of the midrash until current times; to be able to demonstrate how knowledge of passages in the Torah involving trees and plants provides guidance in life and spiritual growth; to apply the rabbinic symbolism of trees and plants to additional Biblical, Talmudic, or Midrashic passages or scenarios involving those trees and plants; and to apply the rabbinic symbolism of trees and plants to create messages relevant to current issues in life and spiritual growth.

Instruction:

Trees and Plants of the Torah (BIB-376) is an advanced Bible course which examines the relevance of trees and plants in the Torah. This is to include not only the explicit references to trees and plants, such as the mitzvos of orlah, shmitah, and bikurim, but also the symbolic significance of trees as interpreted by the rabbis from the composers of the midrash through current times. A major focus will be to understand how Torah scholars over the generations have learned lessons for the man’s daily life and spiritual growth from the metaphorical example of the trees in the Torah, both in lessons from trees in general and from specific types of trees and plants, such as the grapevine and the olive tree. Some of the specific topics will include analysis of the trees of the Garden of Eden, the Burning Bush, and the apple orchard referenced in Yitzchak’s blessing of Eisav.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Bible Studies, Judaic Studies, or Religion (5/21).

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