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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Criminal Justice and Law - Coopersmith

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain and analyze various psychological and developmental factors that contribute to criminal behavior; recognize the various types of crime and typologies; apply research and theory to understanding concepts; critically analyze the relationship between criminal behavior and mental health; and describe the sources of information and measurements of crime, including their limitations.

Instruction:

Criminal Behavior (JUS-395) is designed to provide an understanding of criminal behavior and antisocial behavior from a psychological perspective. Contemporary research, theory, and practice concerning the psychology of crime will be explored. Students will learn about the factors associated with the onset and maintenance of antisocial and criminal behavior.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice or Criminal Behavior (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze and interpret the diversity of social experience associated with criminology and social justice issues, especially as they relate to race, class, gender, age sexual preference, religion and nationality; assess competing theoretical approaches to criminology and social justice issues of publics with differing and multiple interests; specify structural or institutional sources of these criminology and social justice issues; and, propose and assess policies, interventions and/or modes of advocacy that will enact positive change; articulate the applicability of and demonstrate ability to employ a range of research strategies; and articulate the ethical and social justice implications of criminology and justice studies.

Instruction:

Criminology (JUS-185) provides an introduction to the field of criminology, providing an overview of the issues involved in defining, measuring, and explaining crime. Students will learn about the field of criminology, examine general characteristics of crime and criminals, review early and contemporary theories which attempt to explain criminal behavior, and discuss crime in the modern world.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminology, or Criminal Justice (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: categorize the different types of drugs and their impact on individuals; describe the social implications of drug use in society; analyze the effectiveness of drug control strategies and policies; and differentiate drug types, treatment, and interventions used in the Criminal Justice System.  

Instruction:

Drugs, Society, and Criminal Justice (JUS-250 ) is a study of substance abuse and crime. Topics include the history and classification of drug abuse, the impact of drugs on offense, and criminal justice strategies to manage drug abuse. Upon completion, students should identify various types of drugs and their effect on human behavior and society, treatment modalities within the criminal justice system, and the impact of drug policy on society.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Police Science, Public Justice, or Criminal Justice Administration (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the fundamental homeland security management theories; discuss the basic terminology and definitions related to homeland security understanding of emergency management in the United States; demonstrate an understanding of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the laws that provide DHS with its authority, including the U.S.A. Patriot Act; compare the critical components of safety and security for homeland security and emergency management; demonstrate an understanding of the homeland security advisory system and crisis communications; and explore technology and science efforts in homeland security. 

Instruction:

Homeland Security & Terrorism (JUS-275) covers the historical and contemporary issues interrelating terrorism, intelligence, and homeland security. The course represents not only a robust scholarly approach to the study of terrorism but also incorporates the real-world experience of federal agents, police officers, and soldiers tasked with preventing the next terrorist attack on our country. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of people, ideas, organizations, and current issues in the field. This course's approach provides students with a unified and cutting-edge understanding of terrorism, intelligence, and homeland security and their interrelationship.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Homeland Security (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the history and philosophy of the American criminal justice system; discuss the nature and extent of crime in America; analyze the impact and consequences of crime; evaluate the development, concepts, and functions of law in the criminal justice system; and describe the structure of contemporary federal, state, and local justice agencies and processes.

Instruction:

Introduction to Criminal Justice (JUS-175) is designed to provide an introduction to the criminal justice system. This course's primary goal is to develop a general understanding of the criminal justice system and its response to crime in society today. Students will consider crime in the United States, explore the criminal justice system (policing, courts, and corrections), and examine several special issues relevant to criminal justice today. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Police Administration, Forensic Investigations, Financial Crimes Investigations, Cybersecurity, Criminal Intelligence Analysis (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the history and development of forensic science; outline the proper procedures for securing, assessing, and processing crime scenes; describe the proper handling, value, and capabilities of DNA evidence; compare the various types and analysis methods of physical and trace evidence; explain the fundamental analysis of ballistic evidence, tool mark, and other impressions; and discuss the importance of Serology and blood spatter analysis

Instruction:

Introduction to Forensic Science (JUS-177)) examines the principles, theories, and practices of forensic science utilized within the law enforcement community and the American legal system. Forensic science is the study and application of science to the process of law and involves the collection, examination, evaluation and interpretation of evidence. Students will gain a basic understanding of the scientific and analytical approach to determining the evidence's value related to the court of law. 

Credit recommendation:

In the associate degree / certificate category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement, Forensics, Law, or Forensic Biologic Science (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: outline the core issues and principles governing the operations of the criminal justice system; evaluate the theoretical formulations that explain crime, its prevention and control, as well as the operations of the criminal justice agencies; develop in-depth knowledge of justice administration; describe the practices and principles of organization and administration of criminal justice organizations; outline the roles and functions of criminal justice personnel; contrast the ethical issues in criminal justice; and list the rights of criminal justice employees. 

Instruction:

Justice Administration (LAW-275) is designed to familiarize the student with the theoretical and practical management perspectives embraced by the American criminal justice system. This will include the nature of criminal justice organizations, individual and group behavior within those organizations, processes inherent in those organizations, and areas of criminal justice reform.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Justice Administration (5/21). 

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the origins and development of law enforcement; define traditional policing and police professionalization; provide a fundamental understanding of law enforcement and the law; compare and contrast basic policing functions and units; recognize basic responsibilities of patrol and traffic; apply the laws of search and seizure, arrest, and interrogation; apply the principles of investigation and evidence collection; outline police discretion and behavior; examine policing in multicultural communities; describe the concept of policing the police; examine the concepts of community policing and problem solving; analyze the advances in policing and new technologies; and recognize the standards required for police recruitment and retention.

Instruction:

Law Enforcement in the 21st Century (LAW-250) examines the many difficult decisions that criminal justice professionals and agencies make in an environment of competing interests. The decision making of criminal justice professionals is often impacted by their internal as well as external forces. Emphasis is placed on addressing issues and concerns of our justice process in personal, agencies, social, and criminal justice contexts.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Police Science, or Police Administration (5/21).

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: communicate with individuals using verbal and non-verbal methods that recognize diverse cultures, ethnic groups and non-traditional populations; assess social problems and their dynamics within a multicultural context using critical thinking skills; perform functions in a criminal justice profession with respect for diversity and the negative impact of racial problems.

Instruction:

Multicultural Law Enforcement (JUS-210) is designed to provide a comprehensive familiarization with communication styles, customs, language and behavior patterns of various cultures, ethnic groups, and non-traditional populations as employed by and encountered by criminal justice professions; including police, corrections, parole and probation, juvenile and adult caseworkers, private security, loss prevention, private investigators and 911 communications.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Police Science, or Police Administration (5/21).

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