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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

June 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: focus on contemporary geography by examining cultural ecology and environmental determinism, and discovering how new technologies enhance geographical exploration; describe the development of languages and religions and identify differences in religious cultures; infer and justify the origins of human culture and its effect on the environment by examining the domestication of plants and animals and the impact of resource consumption; connect ethnic distribution with settlement patterns and evaluate the effect this has on cities, suburbs, and rural areas; break down economic sectors, assess their standards of living, and anticipate how the economy of a region is affected by its resources; assess the impact humans have on the environment, distinguish between renewable and non-renewable resources, and consider threats to environmental sustainability; weigh and debate the benefits of industrialization, genetic engineering, and chemical pesticides against land conservation and hazardous waste management; identify environmental risk factors such as toxins and pollutants, and question how politics can affect environmental health.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to human cultural geography; the geography of languages, religions, and material culture; the origin and dispersal of humans and culture; effects of population on the environment; domestication of plants and animals; ethnicity and geography; geography of land resources; spatial processes; settlement patterns; modern economic systems; political geography; impacts of humans on the environment; renewable resources; nonrenewable resources; and food and agriculture.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Sciences or Global Interdependencies (6/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

40 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

February 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: summarize aspects of the background of the hospitality industry, including history, growth, statistics, sectors, and corporate philosophies; compare and contrast leading versus managing in the hospitality industry; discuss key management functions including project management, revenue management, accounting, risk management, strategic management, human resources management, and waste management; describe the basic skills needed in the hospitality industry, such as communication and decision making; understand planning and organizing as they relate to the hospitality industry, including aspects such as business strategies, operational plans and structure, teams, and organizational change; explore types of control issues in the hospitality industry, including internal controls, financial controls, budget controls, and inventory control; identify hotel classifications and development including various hotel types and operations; recommend how to run a successful restaurant; and evaluate the economic impact of tourism, ecotourism, recreation, leisure, and wellness.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: hospitality industry overview; leadership and management in the hospitality industry; key management functions in the hospitality industry; communication and decision-making in the hospitality industry; improving service in the hospitality industry; planning and organizing in the hospitality industry; control systems and issues in the hospitality industry; hotel classifications and operations; food, beverage and alcohol operations; restaurant organization and operations overview; tourism and recreation; gaming industry overview; and meetings, conventions, expositions and special events.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Hospitality Management, Hotel and Restaurant Management, or Tourism Management (2/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

August 2017 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define tourism management, identify why people travel and an historical overview of the tourism industry; apply tourism planning strategies used by UNTWO(World Tourism Organization); and other tourism planners and identify sustainability practices in tourism planning; differentiate between the hotels, cruise ships and casinos in terms of classifications and ratings, departments and divisions and modes of transportation used in tourism; understand the role of intermediaries in tourism; analyze social, cultural and economic issues that affect tourism; create tourism marketing strategies; and identify emerging tourism trends.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: overview of the tourism industry; consumer behavior of travelers; world tourism organizations; tourism policy and planning; tourism economics; lodging classifications; lodging operations; food and beverage operations; transportation in tourism management; recreation organizations in tourism management; intermediaries in tourism management; global issues affecting tourism; tourism marketing; tourism and hospitality trends; and tourism and travel careers.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Tourism (8/17). 


Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

48 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

April 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: appraise current trends and impacts on the hospitality industry, including technology, consumer behavior, international travel and tourism, political, social and economic trends, and quick service and limited service restaurants; perform market research within the hospitality industry, including using management information systems, different approaches and designs to research studies, as well as issues within data collection and ethics while researching; evaluate the markets and market segments in the hospitality and tourism industries and how to target those segments, including pricing, brand establishment, marketing strategies, and positioning strategies; recommend effective marketing strategies, including using different marketing channels, niche strategy, relationship marketing and global marketing; explain and describe advertising and its functions within hospitality, as well as different advertising strategies and approaches; assess the role that public relations plays in the hospitality industry including press releases and relations, crisis management, and corporate communication; and analyze the concept of personal selling and relate the steps and different methods involved in the selling process within the hospitality industry.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: basics of hospitality marketing; hospitality industry trends; hospitality marketing research; consumer behavior in the hospitality industry; hospitality market segmentation; pricing for the hospitality industry; hospitality marketing channels; hospitality marketing strategies; advertising for hospitality; hospitality industry and public relations; selling for the hospitality industry; and hospitality marketing and technology.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Hospitality Marketing, Foundations of Marketing for Hospitality, or Marketing (4/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

August 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand global hotel market and its benefits and costs to global economies; evaluate strategic management decisions as they relate to hotel profitability; develop a solid organizational structure for communication throughout the hotel; explain hospitality operational issues and use the information to evaluate decisions; summarize the roles of the Rooms Division and the Sales and Marketing Department and their importance to the profitability of the hotel operation; calculate a hotel’s revenue using revenue management techniques; execute a Human Resources plan for a hotel including job design, performance appraisals, and workplace safety; justify a plan to maintain the safety and security of hotel guests and employees; create a customer service policy for resolving complaints to maintain guest satisfaction; and explain the role of a food and beverage department including its contribution to a hotel’s profitability.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: hotel and lodging industry overview; global hospitality management; leadership in the hotel industry; hotel and lodging strategic management; hotel operations management; rooms division in hotel operations; hotel finance and accounting; revenue management for hotels, hotel sales and marketing department; HR management for hospitality; hotel safety and security; hotel and lodging customer service; food & beverage operations in hotel and lodging; and factors affecting the hotel and lodging industry.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Hospitality Operations (8/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

June 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the formal and informal ways to greet and introduce people in Spanish; use Spanish vocabulary related to counting, telling time, and days of the week; identify and discuss Spanish terms relating to likes and dislikes, pastimes, vacationing, and shopping; describe basic family members as well as personalities and physical traits in Spanish; compare different weather and seasons in Spanish; interpret and explain Spanish terms relating to the community, volunteer work, natural disaster and emergencies; differentiate and apply past, present, and infinitive tense verbs as well as imperfect and preterite (past) tenses in Spanish; and discover and use Spanish vocabulary related to computer, technology, and the media.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: greetings and introductions in Spanish; describing people in Spanish; locations in Spanish: vocabulary and grammar; household terms in Spanish; weather and seasons in Spanish; Spanish numbers; days and dates in Spanish; telling time in Spanish; likes and dislikes in Spanish; -ar verbs in Spanish: present tense conjugation and vocabulary list; -er and -ir verbs in Spanish: present tense; pastimes in Spanish; technology in Spanish; talking about family members in Spanish; shopping in Spanish; discussing the past in Spanish; talking about vacations in Spanish; TV, movies and media in Spanish; discussing community, natural disasters/emergencies in Spanish; and Spanish fables.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Spanish or as part of a Foreign Language requirement (6/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

June 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: use imperfect progressive and preterite (past) verb tenses in Spanish; discuss health and safety issues, and identify parts of the body in Spanish; choose the correct relative pronouns in conversation and translate daily activities such as chores and errands from and into Spanish; distinguish between formal and informal commands, and determine the context in which to use both; use the regular and irregular future tenses in Spanish to discuss academic and career plans; differentiate between the indicative and subjunctive tenses in Spanish, and use the subjunctive to express uncertainty, doubt or desire; articulate feelings and sentiment about social life and relationships in Spanish; recall how to make a request, place an order, and negotiate price in Spanish; recognize the cultural patterns of different regions and countries in Central and South America.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: discussing health and safety in Spanish; discussing daily activities in Spanish; formal and informal Spanish imperatives; describing future school plans in Spanish; giving and asking for advice in Spanish; discussing politics and government in Spanish; discussing work and employment in Spanish; discussing social life and relationships in Spanish; discussing nature and the environment in Spanish; discussing city life in Spanish; visiting a restaurant in Spanish; shopping and negotiating price in Spanish; clothing vocabulary in Spanish; discussing art and culture in Spanish.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Spanish or as part of a Foreign Language requirement (6/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

30 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand culture and etiquette in Spanish-speaking countries, particularly as it applies to the workplace; comprehend basic greetings, numbers, and dates in Spanish; recall Spanish grammar rules; express preferences in Spanish; use Spanish vocabulary for professions, office buildings, equipment and technology; write job applications, resumes, CVs, cover letters, and business communications in Spanish; understand basic Spanish in interviews, meetings, and office conversation; and deliver a business presentation in Spanish fluently and using proper vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation.

Instruction:

Major topics include:culture and etiquette in Spanish-speaking countries; introductions and salutations in Spanish; numbers and payment in Spanish; customer service in Spanish; appointments and dates in Spanish; talking about time in Spanish; professions in Spanish; office buildings in Spanish; office tasks and errands in Spanish; expressing preference in Spanish; leisure activities in Spanish; Spanish terms for technology; job applications and interviews in Spanish; business communication in Spanish; work and benefits in Spanish; negotiations and meetings in Spanish; and office roles and positions in Spanish.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in General Education, Humanities, Liberal Arts and Sciences, or Spanish (12/16).

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