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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Humanities - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2013 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the major civilizations that influenced the visual arts prior from pre-history through the Gothic period; identify the major contributions (e.g., architecture, sculpture, mosaics, or paintings) and styles (e.g., stylized, geometric, or stylized) of art in each civilization from the ancient Near East to Europe during the gothic period; describe specific examples of major visual art pieces from civilizations from the ancient near east to Europe during the Gothic period (e.g., the Parthenon, the Hagia Sophia, or the dome of the rock); describe how politics and culture influenced the visual arts in civilizations from the ancient Near East to Europe during the Gothic period (e.g., how pharaohs were patrons of the arts in ancient Egypt or how the catholic church became an important force for maintaining art and learning during the middle ages); explain how the different civilizations influenced one another from the ancient Near East to Europe during the Gothic period (e.g., how Byzantine art influenced Islamic art); describe how different technological innovations and developments influenced the evolution of the visual arts in civilizations from the ancient Near East to Europe during the Gothic period (e.g., how concrete allowed romans to build more impressive structures or how advances in engineering allowed for elaborately designed churches in gothic Europe).

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: understanding the study of western art, visual art during the prehistoric era, including: Paleolithic and Neolithic, art in Mesopotamia, art in ancient Egypt, art in Aegean culture and ancient Greece, ancient Roman architecture, sculpture and mosaics, Jewish and Christian art in late antiquity, art and religion in the Byzantine Empire, art in the Islamic world, art during the early middle ages in Europe, Romanesque art during the middle ages in Europe, and Gothic art during the Middle Ages in Europe.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Art History or Humanities (12/17). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

35 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: classify architecture throughout time including designs and styles from periods including Egyptian, Baroque, Rococo and Gothic Revival; analyze the relationship between religious beliefs and art in Ancient Egypt and Ancient Greece; explain early Greek philosophers, the study of religion and philosophy and philosophy in the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Neoclassical period, Romantic period and the 20th Century; appraise the different time periods and techniques of British and American literature, including: Middle English, Neoclassical, Victorian and Romantic; demonstrate understanding of the effect of the Renaissance and Reformation in Europe on society, religion, and the arts; describe the roots of the enlightenment and identify the key thinkers during the movement; compare the baroque and the classical period in music and explain the difference between major composers during those times; examine art and identify distinguishing elements representative of various time periods and styles, including Greek, neoclassical and modern; and discover the contributions of contemporary architects and the impact of their structures in modern times.

Instruction:

Major topics include: literary time periods; birth of civilization and the Ancient World; poetry of the Ancient World; ancient art and architecture; Rome and Late Antiquity (250 AD - 550 AD); Roman art and architecture; Middle Ages and medieval society; literature of the Middle Ages; art and architecture of the Middle Ages; Renaissance and Reformation (1300-1650); literature of the Renaissance; art and architecture of the Renaissance and Reformation; The Enlightenment (1650-1800); literature of the Enlightenment; Baroque period in music; classical period in music; Modernism (1800-present); literature of the Victorian Era; Romantic period in literature; Romantic period in music; literary modernism; Modern drama; Modern Era music; and Modern art and architecture.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Humanities (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

May 2014 -  Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define philosophy, identify branches of philosophy, and differentiate philosophy from religion; identify major figures in philosophy and recognize their positions within various branches of philosophy; identify types of fallacies and relate them to fallacies in philosophy; list categories of religious views, recognize major religious ideologies, and identify arguments for and against the existence of God; compare and contrast free will and determinism; identify prominent theories in metaphysics; categorize approaches to ancient, modern, and contemporary epistemology; differentiate values, morals, and ethics and recognize major theories of ethics; identify philosophical theories related to science, politics, and social justice.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to philosophy and logic, types of fallacies, free will and determinism, self, mind and soul in philosophy, God in philosophy, religion and philosophy, reality in philosophy, philosophy in science, intro to epistemology, ancient epistemology, modern epistemology, contemporary epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, philosophy and social justice.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Philosophy (12/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced. 

Dates:

September 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define morality, recognize basic principles of morality, and identify approaches to the study of morality; recognize theories of moral development and moral belief systems; identify the origins of legal, moral, and ethical approaches in America and Western traditions; differentiate consequentialist and non-consequentialist views of morality; list major moral questions related to life and death; apply various moral and ethical paradigms to issues surrounding sexuality and interpersonal relations; recognize the role and application of morals and ethics in business, politics, medicine, and the justice system in the United States; identify categories of human rights and moral and ethical issues associated with humanitarian intervention; list the ways in which humans impact the environment and summarize the moral responsibility of humans to rectify the damage.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to the study of morality, moral belief systems overview, ancient Greek views on ethics and morality, morality in Western religion, natural and moral law theories, consequentialist and non-consequentialist philosophies, ethical issues in life and death, economic inequality and morality, philosophical theories behind the justice system, moral and ethical issues in peacetime vs. war, human rights ethics and morals, ethical issues in relationships and sexuality, bioethics impact on medicine and morality, ethics and morality in business, the environment and ethics.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Philosophy (12/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced. 

Dates:

March 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list elements that compose morality itself and recognize how these elements intersect to produce ethical and unethical worldviews; differentiate between ethical and moral concepts, including autonomy and paternalism, beneficence and non-maleficence, and obligations and prima facie; identify the origins of ethical theory and recognize the ways in which it has evolved from antiquity to the contemporary era; identify logical approaches to assessing social and personal ethical issues; recognize several major theories related to normative human interactions and behaviors; apply ethical theories and philosophies to medicine, the workplace, the environment, and social interactions.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: basic theories of morality, basic concepts of morality, meta-ethics, issues in morality, social and personal ethical issues, ethical issues in health and medicine, professional and business ethics, ethics and the environment.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Philosophy (12/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

26 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the definition of religion, theories on the origin of religions, the differences between polytheism and monotheism, and types of primal religions and mystery cults; outline origins of Hinduism, its sacred texts, its deities, the castes, the four stages of life and the four aims, and rituals, ceremonies, and festivals; examine the founding of Buddhism and the significance of the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path, and the Middle Way; appraise the beginnings of Confucianism, its five relationships, the concept of the dual soul and its origins in China, Japan, and Korea; classify the origins of Taoism, its texts, the differing sects, and the development of institutional Taoism; demonstrate knowledge of the biography of Muhammad and examine the Qur'an, the five pillars of the Islamic faith, Sharia law, scientific and cultural advancements during the Islamic Golden Age, and the major sects; compare the laws and beliefs of Judaism as outlined in the Torah and Talmud, the history of Christian anti-Semitism in medieval Europe, and holidays and rituals; and relate the basics of the gospels, early Christian church persecution, ties to Judaism, the Crusades, various sects of Christianity, and the major saints and thinkers.

Instruction:

Major topics include: Bygone religion; Hinduism; Buddhism; Confucianism;Taoism; Islam; Judaism; and Christianity.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religion or Philosophy (12/16).

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