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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Science - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies; self-paced. 

Dates:

December 2012 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze contributions and major theories related to the study of astronomy in ancient and modern times; evaluate the basic features and motions of the night sky; assess and describe the theories related to the beginning, evolution and fate of the universe; explain how galaxies, including the Milky Way, are formed and distributed; distinguish types of galaxies and their properties; describe the formation and evolution of the solar system and its planets and bodies; identify and describe the major characteristics of the sun, planets, moons, and small bodies in the solar system, including meteoroids, asteroids, and comets; examine the formation, evolution, and death cycle of a variety of different star types; outline theories related to the origin of life and describe predictors of life on other planets; and analyze the physics of light and the electromagnetic spectrum and explain how telescopes can be used to detect and study both.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: the historical background of astronomy, the basics of astronomy, the physics of astronomy, understanding orbits in astronomy, the earth-moon system, the solar system, the inner solar system, gaseous planets in the solar system, comets, moons and asteroids, understanding the science of the sun, types of stars in the universe, formation and evolution of stars, stellar death and remnants, formation and structure of the milky way, properties and characteristics of galaxies, cosmology overview, relativity in space and time, overview of life in the universe, and tools and instruments for astronomy.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Earth Science; Environmental Science; or Cosmology (12/17).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

June 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare and contrast the nucleic acids DNA and RNA; differentiate the parts of cells and explain cell biology; understand genetics and the principles of heredity; describe and analyze metabolic biochemistry; classify organisms to demonstrate a fundamental understanding of taxonomy; analyze how the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, musculoskeletal, nervous and immune systems work; demonstrate how ecosystems form and evolve; illustrate the theory and principles of evolution; know the history of life on Earth; and apply the theories, skills and knowledge of basic biology through laboratory experiments.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: science basics; inorganic chemistry review for biology; organic chemistry introduction; nucleic acids: DNA and RNA; enzymatic biochemistry; cell membranes; cell structure and organelles; DNA replication: processes and steps; transcription and translation processes; genetic mutations; metabolic biochemistry; cell division; physiology I: the musculoskeletal, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and excretory systems; physiology II: the nervous and endocrine systems; reproduction and development in animals; genetics: principles of heredity; ecological principles; principles of evolution; Earth's timeline and evolution; phylogeny and organism classification; molecular biology lab techniques; Biology 101L labs.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in General Biology or Introduction to Biology, Introduction to Genetics, Environmental Control and Management, General Biology, or Bio-Chemical Engineering (6/17).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

June 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define environmental science and distinguish between conservation and preservation; identify and define ecosystems and habitats; evaluate the effects of pollution on ecosystems; illustrate the basics of atmospheric science, including how global warming affects weather patterns and climate; summarize elements of geological science that affect the environment, including tectonic plates and soil erosion; analyze issues affecting water resources, including aquifer depletion and water pollution; explain issues around land use and ownership, including sustainable forest management and wilderness management; calculate the impact of the human population on the environment; appraise waste management procedures and strategies for reducing solid waste; compare reusable and nonrenewable energy sources, including solar energy and fossil fuels; and summarize human behaviors that threaten the environment and identify strategies for sustainable consumption.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to environmental science; ecosystems and the effects of pollution; habitats and ecosystems; the evolution of ecosystems; meteorology and the environment; geology and the environment; biological science; causes and effects of freshwater pollution; the relationship between land and the environment; effects of population growth on the environment; environmental impact of agriculture; solid and hazardous waste; human impact on the environment; renewable resources and the environment; nonrenewable resources; environmental sustainability; analyzing environmental risks; impact of environmental policy.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as an introductory Environmental Science course or Biodiversity, Energy Regulation, or Resource Management (6/17).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

August 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: calculate displacement, velocity and acceleration; determine if the forces on an object are balanced or unbalanced; calculate kinetic, gravitational and elastic potential energies; infer a final energy given a starting energy; differentiate between mass and weight; explain how a hydraulic lift works; describe the three types of heat transference methods and give correct examples for each; describe the relationship between electricity and magnetism; and explain the difference between how alpha, beta and gamma radiation affects the nucleus of an atom.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to physics; overview of vectors; overview of kinematics; overview of forces; overview of gravity; basics of Newton's first law; basics of Newton's second law; basics of Newton's third law; energy and work in physics; overview of linear momentum in physics; basics of rotational motion; waves in physics; sound and light in physics; basics of optics; fluid dynamics in physics; basics of thermodynamics in physics; overview of electrostatics; overview of magnetism; and basics of nuclear physics.

Credit recommendation:

In lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physics or Basic Sciences (8/17).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2013 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the scientific method and apply it; to experiments; illustrate the basic concepts of motion, force and friction, including newton's laws of motion; distinguish between speed, velocity, and acceleration, and solve problems involving the three concepts; solve problems involving vectors, motion, slope, and linear momentum; summarize newton's law of gravitation and how; it affects motion and centripetal forces; differentiate between linear and rotational motion; articulate the properties and relationship of energy, work, and power; explain the properties of mechanical waves, including resonance, reflection, diffraction, and the differences between transverse and longitudinal waves; paraphrase Pascal's, Archimedes', and Bernoulli's principles; and discuss the principles of simple harmonic motion.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: math basics for physics, the scientific model, using vectors in physics, displacement, velocity and acceleration; understanding kinematics in physics, basics of Newton's laws of motion; Newton's law of gravitation; understanding work, energy and power, linear momentum, overview of rotational motion, overview of oscillations in physics, overview of waves in physics, overview of sound in physics, overview of light in physics, and overview of fluids in physics.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower level baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physics or General Science (12/17).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2013 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the three means of heat is transferred and give examples for each; restate the first and second laws of thermodynamics in their own words; apply the ideal gas law to calculate the pressure, volume or temperature of an ideal; gas; discuss the characteristics of the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum; demonstrate ray tracing techniques for lenses and mirrors; calculate the electric field generated by a charge at a given distance; explain the relationship between moving electric charges and magnetic fields; calculate the changes we see (length contraction, time dilation) due to things moving at relativistic speeds; and paraphrase what wave-particle duality means for; material objects such as electrons or planets.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: energy transfers in physics, heat transfer and thermodynamics, heat transfer and interaction, thermodynamics and ideal gas law, the basics of thermodynamics, ideal gas law, ideal gas law and kinetic theory, light and electromagnetic waves, applying wave optics, mirrors and lenses in geometric optics, basics of electrostatics, magnetic and electric forces and fields, magnetism basics, voltage, current and resistance in circuits, series, parallel and combined circuits, capacitors, inductors, and alternating currents, modern quantum theory, atomic and nuclear theory, basic nuclear physics, and general and special relativity.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower level baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physics or General Science (12/17).

Length:

34 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the relationships between force, motion and acceleration, the laws describing circular motion and gravitational forces, mass-energy conversion, different energy types and the law of thermodynamics and how it applies to physical science; define reflection, dispersion, refraction in the electromagnetic spectrum, characteristics of visible light waves and the fundamentals of electric power, circuits and currents; examine the practical applications of magnetic forces, the strength, shape and direction of magnetic fields and the variables affecting electromagnetic induction; breakdown how to convert units of measurement, conduct dimensional analyses, the concept of significant figures, scientific notation and the differences between matter's physical and chemical properties; examine molality and molarity, Raoult's law and colligative properties, as well as the formation and properties of ionic compounds; investigate diagrams and theories used to explain ion formation, bond polarity, intermolecular forces and molecular shape; interpret groups and periods in the periodic table, early atomic theory, atomic numbers, mass and the laws that apply to atoms, steps for balancing chemical equations and calculating excess reactants, percent composition, reaction yield, percent yield and radioactivity; and examine the pH scale along with the Bronsted-Lowry, Lewis and Arrhenius definitions of acids and bases, acid-base and solubility equilibriums.

Instruction:

Course materials are presented via audio visual materials. Major topics include: force, mass, and Newton's Laws of Motion; thermodynamics and energy; principles of thermodynamics; sound waves and optics; basics of electric power; magnetic forces and fields; experimental chemistry in the laboratory; properties of matter in chemistry; compounds and concentration; basics of chemical bonding; properties of gases and gas laws; kinetics in chemistry; the Periodic Table; atoms and Atomic Theory; understanding stoichiometry; radioactivity; acid-base chemical reactions; and chemical equilibrium.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Physical Science or Principles of Physical Science (12/16) (04/22 revalidation).

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