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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Science - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced. 

Dates:

December 2012 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze contributions and major theories related to the study of astronomy in ancient and modern times; evaluate the basic features and motions of the night sky; assess and describe the theories related to the beginning, evolution and fate of the universe; explain how galaxies, including the Milky Way, are formed and distributed; distinguish types of galaxies and their properties; describe the formation and evolution of the solar system and its planets and bodies; identify and describe the major characteristics of the sun, planets, moons, and small bodies in the solar system, including meteoroids, asteroids, and comets; examine the formation, evolution, and death cycle of a variety of different star types; outline theories related to the origin of life and describe predictors of life on other planets; and analyze the physics of light and the electromagnetic spectrum and explain how telescopes can be used to detect and study both.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: the historical background of astronomy, the basics of astronomy, the physics of astronomy, understanding orbits in astronomy, the earth-moon system, the solar system, the inner solar system, gaseous planets in the solar system, comets, moons and asteroids, understanding the science of the sun, types of stars in the universe, formation and evolution of stars, stellar death and remnants, formation and structure of the milky way, properties and characteristics of galaxies, cosmology overview, relativity in space and time, overview of life in the universe, and tools and instruments for astronomy.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Earth Science; Environmental Science; or Cosmology (12/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

40 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:compare and contrast the nucleic acids DNA and RNA; differentiate the parts of cells and explain cell biology; understand genetics and the principles of heredity; describe and analyze metabolic biochemistry; classify organisms to demonstrate a fundamental understanding of taxonomy; analyze how the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, musculo-skeletal, nervous and immune systems work; demonstrate how ecosystems form and evolve; illustrate the theory and principles of evolution; and explain the history of life on Earth.

Instruction:

Course materials are presented via audio visual materials. Major topics include: science basics; inorganic chemistry review for biology; organic chemistry introduction; nucleic acids of DNA and RNA; enzymatic biochemistry; cell membranes; cell structure and organelles; DNA replication's processes and steps; transcription and translation processes; genetic mutations; metabolic biochemistry; cell division; the muscular skeletal, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and excretory systems; the nervous and endocrine systems; reproduction and development in animals; and genetics and principles of heredity; ecological principles; principles of evolution; earth's timeline and evolution; phylogeny and organism classification; and molecular biology lab techniques.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate  degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology, Natural Sciences, or as a general education requirement (12/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

June 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare and contrast the nucleic acids DNA and RNA; differentiate the parts of cells and explain cell biology; understand genetics and the principles of heredity; describe and analyze metabolic biochemistry; classify organisms to demonstrate a fundamental understanding of taxonomy; analyze how the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, musculoskeletal, nervous and immune systems work; demonstrate how ecosystems form and evolve; illustrate the theory and principles of evolution; know the history of life on Earth; and apply the theories, skills and knowledge of basic biology through laboratory experiments.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: science basics; inorganic chemistry review for biology; organic chemistry introduction; nucleic acids: DNA and RNA; enzymatic biochemistry; cell membranes; cell structure and organelles; DNA replication: processes and steps; transcription and translation processes; genetic mutations; metabolic biochemistry; cell division; physiology I: the musculoskeletal, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and excretory systems; physiology II: the nervous and endocrine systems; reproduction and development in animals; genetics: principles of heredity; ecological principles; principles of evolution; Earth's timeline and evolution; phylogeny and organism classification; molecular biology lab techniques; Biology 101L labs.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in General Biology or Introduction to Biology, Introduction to Genetics, Environmental Control and Management, General Biology, or Bio-Chemical Engineering (6/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

25 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2011 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze DNA and RNA replication, types and structure, prokaryotic transcription, eukaryotic transcription, the genetic code, and protein synthesis; examine the basic principles of genetics, properties of alleles, Mendel's laws, complementation tests, exceptions to simple dominance, polygenic traits, epistasis, and heredity; compare and contrast invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms, the pattern formation in the basic body plan, and the different types of genes; analyze the theory of evolution, the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, natural selection, inbreeding, genetic fitness, and speciation; summarize what causes mutations, including mutagens, irradiation, and DNA base excision repair; breakdown human genetics research, including pedigrees, population genetics, genetic disorders, sex chromosomes, and genetic testing; review topics related to comparative genomics, such as homology, prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and chromosomes; and relate the polymerase chain reaction, cloning, genetic modification, and the Human Genome Project.

Instruction:

Methods of instruction include audio visual materials and classroom exercises. Major topics include: the molecular and chromosomal basics of inheritance; transmission/Mendelian Genetics; population genetics and evolution; model organisms and developmental genetics; DNA damage, mutation, and repair; human genetics; DNA technology and transgenic organisms.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaurate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology, Natural Science, or as a general education requirement (12/16). 

Location:

Various: distance learning format.

Length:

30 hours (12 weeks). 

Dates:

December 2013 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the structure, function, physiology and metabolism of bacteria and viruses; differentiate between bacterial infection, viral infection and disease; categorize the types of viruses and explain how they replicate; analyze diseases caused by DNA viruses, RNA viruses and protozoa; identify and define food-borne illnesses and bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal tract; outline the causes and symptoms of sexually transmitted bacterial diseases; identify the types of bacterial skin, wound and respiratory infections; and apply basic immunology to model the body's defenses against pathogens.

Instruction:

Course materials are presented via audio visual materials. Major topics include: microbiology basics; biology of bacteria; the disease process; introduction to viruses; DNA viruses; RNA viruses; diseases caused by protozoa; fungal infections; foodborne diseases and bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal tract; sexually transmitted bacterial diseases; blood-borne bacterial diseases; bacterial diseases of the respiratory tract; bacterial wound and skin infections; principles of immunology; and antimicrobial drugs.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or Science (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

36 hours (6 weeks).  

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to;illustrate the structure and explain the function of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems; categorize the organs of the digestive system and explain their role in digestion; illustrate the urinary system and how the body is detoxified; diagram the structure and explain the function and common disorders of the endocrine system; analyze the structure and function of the brain and nervous system; summarize the senses and how they function; outline and model the muscular system, including muscle cells, tissues, contraction, and gross anatomy; differentiate the bones in the human body and describe the function of the skeletal system; and define the anatomy and physiology of the male and female reproductive systems.

Instruction:

Major topics include an overview of anatomy and cell biology; human respiratory system; cardiovascular system; blood vessels; digestive system; urinary system; endocrine system; the brain; the nervous system at the cellular level; the five senses; muscle physiology; gross anatomy of muscular system; connective tissue; skeletal system; and male and female reproductive systems.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or Science (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

30 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:explain cellular injury, cellular adaptation, neoplasia, the types of growth it can cause, what causes cancer and causes of a decrease in number and size of cells; categorize the causes of inflammation, autoimmune responses, acute and chronic inflammation, and inflammation's impact on the entire body; discuss the structure and function of human skin, physical causes of skin inflammation and inflammatory disorders; paraphrase the nervous system's functions, diseases that affect the nervous system and pain types; compare and contrast the various types and causes of cardiovascular and blood disorders, conditions, and diseases; explain how carbon dioxide is transported in the blood, diseases and conditions of the lungs, and how the lungs affect the heart; summarize the structure of the kidney, diseases and conditions that affect the kidney, and the roles that sodium, chloride and potassium play in human bodies; examine the diseases and conditions that affect the stomach, small intestine, gall bladder and pancreas; identify the disorders and diseases of bone tissues and joints, including myopathy, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and of the human reproductive system; and appraise the normal range of values for electrolytes and glucose in the blood and urine, and understand the importance of various clinical tests.

Instruction:

Major topics include: pathophysiology components; inflammation causes and treatment; pathophysiology of cancer and neoplasia; skin disorders and pathophysiology; nervous system injuries and traumas; major nervous system disorders; congenital heart and cardiovascular defects; developed cardiovascular abnormalities; respiratory system pathologies; urinary system diseases; gastrointestinal system conditions; diabetes and metabolic derangements; anemia causes, types, and classification; hematological conditions and pathologies; blood cancers; musculoskeletal system disorders and diseases; disorders of the reproductive system; and clinical tests for electrolyte levels.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or Science (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

26 hours (7 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the metric system, unit conversion, scientific notation, Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford and Millikan, Avogadro's number, the four quantum numbers, the physical and chemical properties of matter and the states of matter; examine atomic numbers and mass numbers, the periodic table, the energy levels of atoms of elements, ionization energy, electronegativity and transition metals vs. main group elements; identify types of radioactive decay and learn about balancing nuclear equations, calculating radioactive decay and interpreting decay graphs; classify the octet rule, Lewis structures of atoms, ionic compounds, covalent compounds, molecular orbital theory, metallic bonding, identification of organic and inorganic macromolecules and functional groups in organic molecules; illustrate the kinetic molecular theory, phase changes, heating curves, temperature units, the Boltzmann distribution and Graham's law; summarize the rate of dissolution, solubility, colligative properties, Raoult's law, calculating molarity and molality concentration, calculating dilution of solutions and using colligative properties to determine molar mass; paraphrase how to balance chemical equations, calculate relative quantities in a gas or solution, calculate excess reactants and calculate reaction yield and percentage yield from a limiting reactant; generate the definition of decomposition, the pH scale, precipitation reactions, electrochemical cells, electrochemistry, oxidation numbers, and single displacement and combustion reactions; breakdown dynamic equilibrium, Le Chatelier's principle, solubility equilibrium, the common ion effect and selective precipitation; examine the rate of a chemical reaction, rate constant and rate laws, the rate of a chemical reaction and activation energy; and analyze the metric system, unit conversion, scientific notation, Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford and Millikan, Avogadro's number, the four quantum numbers, the physical and chemical properties of matter and the states of matter.

Instruction:

Course materials are presented via audio visual materials. Major topics include experimental chemistry and introduction to matter; atom; the periodic table; nuclear chemistry; chemical bonding; liquids and solids; gases; solutions; stoichiometry; chemical reactions; equilibrium; and kinetics.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology, General Chemistry, Health Science, or Nutrition Science (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

36 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe basic scientific concepts including the scientific method, periodic table, experimental design, key principals of elements and matter, and the metric system; differentiate between catastrophism and uniformitarianism, numerical and relative dating, and the principles of relative dating and radioactive dating; analyze the internal and external forces that shape Earth through looking at the four spheres of Earth, the mechanism of plate tectonics and continental drift, causes and types of volcanoes, and the cause of earthquakes; compare and contrast the physical properties of minerals and rocks, including sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks; discuss mechanical weathering, chemical weathering, rates of weathering rock, types of erosion and wasting and deformation causes, stages and byproducts; outline the water cycle, distribution of water, drainage basins, stream flow, groundwater systems, and the effect of erosion and deposition on land forms; categorize types of glaciers, glacier movement, glacier budget, erosion, deposition, glaciation and causes of glaciation; relate continental margins, ocean basins, properties of ocean water, marine organisms, coastal hazards, tsunamis and shoreline erosion; investigate atmosphere composition and weather through looking at atmosphere structure, solar radiation, temperature, clouds, wind, humidity, air pressure, types of storms and heat transfer; and evaluate the weather by studying wind, air pressure, atmospheric circulation, air masses, weather fronts, tornadoes, thunderstorms, cyclones.

Instruction:

Course materials are prestend via audio visual materials. Major topics include: earth science basics; geologic time; characteristics of matter; earth's spheres and internal structure; plate tectonics; minerals and rocks; igneous rocks; volcanic landforms; weathering and erosion; sedimentary rocks; metamorphic rocks; rock deformation and mountain building; water balance on earth; running water; ground water; glaciers; oceans; coastal hazards; earth's atmosphere; weather, air masses, and storms; earthquakes; earth history; and energy resources.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Earth Science (12/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

June 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define environmental science and distinguish between conservation and preservation; identify and define ecosystems and habitats; evaluate the effects of pollution on ecosystems; illustrate the basics of atmospheric science, including how global warming affects weather patterns and climate; summarize elements of geological science that affect the environment, including tectonic plates and soil erosion; analyze issues affecting water resources, including aquifer depletion and water pollution; explain issues around land use and ownership, including sustainable forest management and wilderness management; calculate the impact of the human population on the environment; appraise waste management procedures and strategies for reducing solid waste; compare reusable and nonrenewable energy sources, including solar energy and fossil fuels; and summarize human behaviors that threaten the environment and identify strategies for sustainable consumption.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to environmental science; ecosystems and the effects of pollution; habitats and ecosystems; the evolution of ecosystems; meteorology and the environment; geology and the environment; biological science; causes and effects of freshwater pollution; the relationship between land and the environment; effects of population growth on the environment; environmental impact of agriculture; solid and hazardous waste; human impact on the environment; renewable resources and the environment; nonrenewable resources; environmental sustainability; analyzing environmental risks; impact of environmental policy.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as an introductory Environmental Science course or Biodiversity, Energy Regulation, or Resource Management (6/17).

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