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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Education - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

30 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: summarize education in colonial times, the Freedmen's Bureau, school desegregation, the impact of the Space Race on math and science education, modern divisions of public schools and standardized testing efforts in the 21st century; examine the impact of several well-known pioneers in the field of education throughout history and modernity; break down the major thinkers and theories presented by Jerome Bruner, Alfred Binet, B.F. Skinner and Howard Gardner, Bloom's Taxonomy, the Eight Stages of Psycho-social Development, Piaget's Cognitive Development theory and Thorndike's behavioral theory; appraise philosophies as behaviorism, constructivism, critical theory and humanism and present practical teaching applications for information processing theory, Jeffersonianism, pragmatism, realism and progressivism; explain the impact of A Nation at Risk, the Education For All Handicapped Children's Act, Goals 2000 and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the Morrill Land-Grant Acts and discusses No Child Left Behind and Title IX; compare and contrast the role of the local Board of Education, the state and federal government play in public education; describe the function and purpose of Individualized Education Plans, Section 504 regulations for public schools, and current efforts in improving gender equality in education; and Identify requirements and political activism of the National Education Association and American Federation of Teachers.

Instruction:

Major topics include: history of education in the United States; pioneers of education; psychology's impact on education; major philosophies of education; education court cases, legislation, and federal documents; special and inclusive education; and national professional organizations in education.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Teacher Education Pre-K-12 (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

17 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply classroom management techniques such as behaviorism, humanism, and operant conditioning; demonstrate the link between classic psychology and classroom management; develop a personal philosophy for classroom management and understand why such philosophies are important; understand and assess the impact of student motivation on learning; create plans for daily classroom schedules; demonstrate ways to create effective, respectful, and challenging learning environments; outline strategies for applying discipline in the classroom; and summarize the Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) method and categorize management strategies for diverse classrooms.

Instruction:

Major topics include: practical classroom management; psychology and classroom management; personal philosophy of classroom management; engagement and motivation in the classroom; routines and technology in the classroom; forming positive learning environments; addressing classroom disciplinary problems; and management strategies for diverse classrooms.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Teacher Education Pre-K-12 (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

20 hours (15 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply the principles of differentiated instruction; create differentiated instruction plans based on student readiness, student interests, and learner profiles; summarize the benefits of technology as an instructional tool; evaluate the importance of assessments in differentiated instruction; identify and utilize different strategies of differentiated instruction; explain classroom management techniques for the differentiated instruction classroom; and apply strategies for adapting instruction to learner needs.

Instruction:

Major topics include: basics of differentiated instruction; creating differentiated instruction plans; student profiles and differentiated instruction; adapting to learner needs; differentiating instruction in the classroom; techniques for differentiating instruction; using assessments with differentiated instruction; student motivation and differentiated instruction; and using technology as an instructional tool.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Teacher Education Pre-K-12 (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

15 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: breakdown the rulings in major cases concerning the rights of disabled students, including PARC ( Pennsylvania Association for Retarded Children) versus Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Mills versus Board of Education of DC, Honig versus Doe, and others; explain the intricacies and impacts of major government acts that affected the rights of people with disabilities, such as Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act; dissect the government's role in education at the local, state, and federal levels; summarize the federal guidelines for special education, how students qualify for services, and the difference between Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and 504 plans; understand and analyze each part of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, paying specific attention to the importance Free Appropriate Public Education and Least Restrictive Environments; evaluate Individualized Education Plans, understand how they are created, and explain the individual parts and their importance to a student's family; develop a behavioral intervention plan that takes into account the disciplinary protections in place for students with disabilities; and appraise recent trends in special education such as the long-term effects of the No Child Left Behind Act as well as the efforts to include students with disabilities in general classrooms.

Instruction:

Major topics include: fundamentals of special education law; the U.S. government's role in education; special education qualifications; dissecting the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; understanding individualized education plans; managing disciplinary and behavioral issues; and recent trends in special education.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Teacher Education Pre-K-12 (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

25 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

April 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the stages of cognitive development, zone of proximal development, and stages of development theories from various psychologists; distinguish forms of development and cognitive and fine motor skills in children, including behavior, abnormalities, and the impact of abuse and neglect; explain the benefits of early childhood education and the curriculum, programs, and services it offers; appraise infants’ and toddlers’ cognitive and social development, including emotional expression in the first two years of life; compare and contrast different preschool and kindergarten methods of education, including Montessori, Emilia, High/Scope, and Waldorf approaches; summarize strategies for teaching to course standards and types of learning in childhood education; analyze ways to educate students with regards to diversity, learning disabilities, prejudice, and gender equality; evaluate assessments and developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) for early childhood, preschool, special education, and more; define parent-child relationships and the impact of different types of family structure; and identify effective teaching and professional developments, focusing on organizations in education such as the NAEYC, ACEI, NEA.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: history and theories of early childhood education; typical and atypical early childhood development; programs and curriculum for early childhood education; social and cognitive development in infants and toddlers; early childhood education for preschool and kindergarten; instructional strategies for early childhood education; student diversity and equality; student assessment and developmentally appropriate practices; family and community involvement in childhood education; and professional development and organizations in early childhood education.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education or Early Childhood Education (4/17).

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