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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Criminal Justice - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

40 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the history of criminology and identify and distinguish the various criminology theories and schools of thought; define and compare different types of crime and understand the appropriate methods of punishment for each; explain the history, structure, and function of the United States criminal justice system; describe the litigation process and what it entails; recall the history of corrections and probation and describe prison culture and the evolution of the juvenile justice system; examine the present-day controversies related to criminal justice, including those regarding policing styles, Constitutional Law, and criminal sentencing (capital punishment); recognize the various levels of law enforcement (local, state, and federal) and the duties for each; compare the organization of federal and state court systems and the relationship between them; identify the function and jurisdiction of original, appellate, and Supreme Court systems; define the roles of courtroom participants and explain courtroom processes; recognize the various law types (criminal, civil, public, and private); and evaluate different criminal trials in the U.S. Justice System.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to crime and criminology; theories of crime; types of crime; victims and victimization in criminal justice; the criminal justice field; the United States court system; constitutional law in the U.S.; criminal law in the U.S.; the criminal trial in the U.S. justice system; the sentencing process in criminal justice; criminal justice agencies in the U.S.; law enforcement in the U.S.; the role of the police department; corrections and correctional institutions; and the juvenile justice system.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Principles of Criminal Justice, Introduction to Criminal Justice, Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration, or Foundations in Criminal Justice (12/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

August 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and explain the fundamental concepts that make up the criminology field; summarize the historical context behind various major theories of crime and criminal behavior, and the elements of the criminal enterprise; distinguish criminology theories and how they relate to modern research and societal experiences; compare different methods of measuring crime in the United States; evaluate different ways agencies collects and present crime data; define and categorize distinct types of crime, punishments, and societal responses to criminal activity; understand victimology, its history, and how it relates to criminology.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: Introduction to criminology; crime categories, characteristics and elements; measuring crime through criminal justice research; crime patterns and trends; victimization in criminal justice; rational choice and trait theories in criminology; social structure and social process theories in criminology; social conflict theories and restorative justice; developmental theories of crime; overview of violent crime; types of murder; types of sex crimes; basics of property crime; economic and public order crimes; crimes of moral turpitude; political crime and terrorism; understanding cyber crime; American criminal justice systems; law enforcement in America; and punishment and corrections.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Administration of Justice, or Public Justice (8/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2012 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the fundamentals of forensic science; describe the role of forensic science in the larger criminal justice system; list and discuss the responsibilities and procedures of persons conducting forensic examinations of crime scenes; outline different broad categories of physical evidence; match and discuss the best analytical techniques to each physical evidence category; describe how forensic science is being applied to new types of evidentiary material such as DNA and computers; analyze the ramifications of using forensic science on new types of evidentiary material on scientific, ethical and privacy issues; and explain and evaluate a topic in forensic science, research and analyze that topic further and produce a cogent research paper on the subject.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to forensic science, physical evidence and crime scene reconstruction, conducting death investigations, trace evidence in hair and fibers, fingerprint analysis and collection, types and uses of microscopes, firearms, tool marks and impression evidence, drugs and substances in forensic science, forensic toxicology,; physical evidence analysis, forensic serology, basics of DNA in forensic science, fire and explosion investigations, computer and mobile device forensic, and forensic document analysis.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice Administration, Police Administration, Financial Crimes Investigation, or Cybersecurity Investigation (12/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze the nature and purpose of criminal law, and the sources of criminal law; explain the differences between substantive and procedural law; assess the elements of criminal liability, and how those elements manifest themselves in specific crimes; apply legal principles to factual situations; differentiate and understand the historical background of criminal law, common law, codified statutes, the model penal code, and federal and state statutes; evaluate factual patterns, determine whether conduct will result in criminal sanctions and reach conclusions determining what criminal charges, if any, will be levied;  analyze the elements of each criminal offense, differentiate between the levels of crime, and assess elements of each offense; identify conduct that will make an individual criminally culpable for his/her actions.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: criminal law: purposes, scope and sources, understanding the types of jurisdiction, essential elements of a crime, criminal liability types justification and excuse defenses, substantive and procedural law; punishment and sentencing in criminal law; legal overview of homicide, sexual offenses and offenders overview, robbery, theft, burglary and property crimes, assault and battery overview, false imprisonment and kidnapping, white, blue and green-collar crime.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice Administration, Police Administration, Financial Crimes Investigation, Pre-Law, or Cybersecurity Investigation (12/17). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: acquire a sense of the scope and nature of delinquency; analyze delinquency causation as indicated by biological, psychological and sociological theoretical explanations; evaluate the social context (family, school and peers) of delinquency; explain law enforcement, court and correctional function within the juvenile justice system; and compare and contrast the major forms and objectives of delinquency prevention.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes, final projects, and a proctored final exam. Topics include: defining juvenile delinquency, theories of delinquent behavior, influence of gender and family on delinquency, school issues and delinquenc, social forces and delinquency, policing and juveniles, adjudication of juvenile delinquents, and juvenile corrections and deterrence.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice Administration, Child Life Studies, or Human Services (12/17).

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