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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

English - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

April 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: summarize the importance of public speaking and distinguish how public speaking differs from casual conversation; identify characteristics of effective presentations and strategies for developing them; and analyze the process of tailoring business presentations to different audiences.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: the importance of public speaking and presentation skills; developing presentation skills; tailoring business presentations to an audience; delivering a presentation; and using visuals in a presentation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or as a general elective (4/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

20 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the historical tradition of public speaking and different types of speeches; analyze informal and formal methods for conducting audience analysis; examine the general and specific purpose of a speech as well as techniques for generating main ideas and developing a thesis; differentiate primary and secondary research; evaluate types of supporting material and source credibility; survey criteria for selecting main and supporting ideas; research organizational patterns for informative and persuasive speeches; analyze the uses of preparation and speaking outlines as well as components of a speech's introduction, transitions, and conclusions; contrast written and oral language styles as well as impromptu, extemporaneous, manuscript and memorized speeches; discuss strategies for developing effective, informative, and persuasive speeches as well as special occasion speeches designed to entertain; explain components of rhetorical proof and the differences between inductive, deductive, causal, and analogical reasoning; and describe methods for evaluating oneself as a speaker as well as guidelines for evaluating other public speakers.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to public speaking; analyzing the audience; listening and feedback; selecting the topic, purpose, and thesis of the speech; researching the speech; organizing the speech; outlining the speech; language and style; speech delivery; selecting and incorporating visual supports; types of speeches; reasoning and rhetorical proof; speech evaluation; and preparing for an impromptu speech.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in English (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

34 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare and contrast poetry and prose and identify various literary devices such as rhyme and magical realism; analyze Old and Middle English literature to discover the emergence of genre, vernacular, and frame narratives; demonstrate how the themes, plot, and characters of the Renaissance in English literature shape contemporary literature; dissect major works from the 17th and 18th century to understand their effect on society through religion, satire, and romance; survey the romantic period through poetry and prose to analyze the themes of emotion, nature, and beauty; discuss the effects of Victorian literature on social and class issues; evaluate turn-of-the-century literature to distinguish how themes of fear, vanity, and oppression connect to each author's personal struggle; analyze modernist literature and discuss modern literary devices such as stream of consciousness and nonlinear plot lines; and consider the effect of criticism and nonfiction in English literature.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to English literature; literary terms and analysis; Old and Middle English literature; the Renaissance in English literature;17th and 18th century English literature; romantic prose in English literature; romantic poetry in English literature; Victorian literature; turn-of-the-century literature; modernism in English literature; nonfiction in English literature; and analysis of English literature.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or English Literature (12/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

25 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

February 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and analyze the use of literary techniques in American literature; understand and interpret the themes from early American literature; illustrate the identify qualities of Romantic literature; compare the Dark Romantics with the earlier Romantic period and their key features; distinguish between Transcendentalism and Realism in American literature and explain how Transcendentalism influenced the rise of Realism; analyze Modernist prose, poetry, and plays, comparing important works with each other to find common qualities; explain the influence of the Harlem Renaissance on the periods of American literature after its rise; and point out examples of literature of the Contemporary period and how those works were informed by previous periods of literature.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Course topics include: analyzing American literature; Colonial and Early National period in literature; the Romantic period in literature; dark romantics; transcendentalism in literature; realism in literature; modernist prose and plays; modernist poetry; the Harlem Renaissance and literature; and literature of the Contemporary period.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or American Cultures (2/17).

Location:
Length:

25 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

February 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: infer the meaning of words using context clues such as connotation, denotation, tone, and mood; analyze different types of poetry including blank verse, free verse, narrative poems, and lyric poetry; interpret the meaning in different types of prose such as novels, short stories, and folktales; distinguish between different types of dramatic writing, including tragedy, comedy, farce, melodrama, and mixed forms; define and summarize different literary terms such as metaphor, synecdoche, metonymy, clichés, equivocations, allusion, themes, and motif; compare and contrast different types of points of view, including limited, objective, and omniscient; and write and proofread literary analysis essays.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: interpreting literature; literary terms; prose; short fiction; types of poetry; dramatic literature; and basics of writing essays.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/ associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English (2/17).

 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

25 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and use important aspects of English grammar such as independent and dependent clauses, punctuation, and pronouns; apply good diction, style, and tone to write clearly and logically; organize, write, and revise an essay with a thesis statement, sources, and structured paragraphs; determine the appropriate sources to use for an essay and cite them properly; identify the components of a good essay and apply these concepts in practice; revise, peer-review, and edit essays for spelling and grammar; and use context words to improve reading comprehension.

Instruction:

Major topics include: grammar; usage; how to revise an essay; using source materials; parts of an essay; essay writing; reading and understanding essays; and composition best practices such as theory and application.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in English (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

25 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

February 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compose a short research proposal and create an outline; identify the components of a research paper; write a research paper; write an argumentative essay; compile research and determine appropriate resources for research papers; demonstrate how to correctly document sources; understand and apply proper capitalization, punctuation, and spelling; and revise and edit essays.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced.  Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include:  composing research proposals and outlines; writing research papers; writing argumentative research essays; creating source materials for research papers; documenting sources for essays; capitalization, punctuation and spelling in research essays; and revising and editing essays.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/ associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English (2/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

15 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define technical communication and examine its characteristics; choose the right tone and select the best words for a message using nondiscriminatory language, active verbs, and active voice in business communication; identify the purpose of messages and adapt messages for the selected audience with a focus on the different channels of communication, primary and secondary research, and methods for assessing validity of sources; determine how to achieve clarity in technical communication and identify five patterns of organization used for clarity; distinguish between formal and informal reports and compare different report types (e.g., progress reports, research and lab reports, incident reports, recommendation reports, feasibility reports, and evaluation reports); contrast technical descriptions and definitions and outline the purpose of introductions, conclusions, and recommendations; assess the different types of correspondence and communication (e.g., e-mails, print communication, memos, instant and text messaging); evaluate types of resumes and the purposes for letters of employment; demonstrate how to follow the writing process to create instructions and evaluate technical instructions; differentiate between different types of manuals (print versus e-manual), assess standard operating procedure, and demonstrate how to follow the writing process to create manuals; and analyze the content and structure of proposals and compare the different proposal types.

Instruction:

Methods of instruction include audiovisual materials and computer-based training. Major topics include: introduction to technical writing; pre-writing for technical documents; writing technical documents; technical editing and writing; elements of technical documents; business reports and proposals; technical correspondence; technical writing in business correspondence; technical resumes and cover letters; technical instructions; writing technical manuals; and how to write proposals.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in technical Writing or English (12/16).  

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2012 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: delineate the characteristics of the major genres for the  short  story and support those definitions with specific illustrations from appropriate texts; explain the significance of selected short stories in the context of their historic, social, and political period; evaluate the multicultural perspectives and concerns of the short story in relation to race, gender, age, class, and religion;  measure advanced critical thinking skills, including: evaluate key concepts, apply these concepts appropriately, analyze phenomena, evaluate and justify positions; and deliver clear written communication that informs and engages the audience.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: short stories, short story analysis, historical precursors to the short story, 19th-century romantic short stories, 19th-Century Russian realism in short stories, 19th-Century British short stories, 19th and early 20th-Century American naturalist short stories, early 20th-Century feminist short stories, post-WWI short stories, literary modernist short stories, short stories in multicultural literature, and short stories in postcolonial literature.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or as a general elective (12/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2012 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify issues and terms to address a research question; differentiate sources of knowledge; develop strategies to access information in multiple types of databases; evaluate sources for credibility and biases; create APA-formatted in-text citations, annotated bibliographies, and reference lists; and explain the ethical and legal use of research in articles, essays, and reports.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: information literacy standards and the research process, information organization, web resource use, search engines, inquiries, and library databases, using periodicals, reference materials and articles, evaluating sources for research, and plagiarism and ethical use of information.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or as a general elective (12/17).

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