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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Psychology and Sociology - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

34 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2011 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the elements of the study of psychology, including how the scientific method applies to psychology; differentiate sensation and perception; categorize the states of consciousness; differentiate between operant and classical conditioning and examine famous experiments that contributed to understanding of conditioning; evaluate how memory is stored and categorized; interpret the contributions of developmental psychologists, including Piaget and Kohlberg; analyze Freud's theories of psycho-sexual development and defense mechanisms; evaluate concepts of social psychology, including stereotypes and attraction; diagram and explain different types of psychological disorders, including anxiety and mood disorders; and outline the basics of statistics, tests, and measurement used in psychology.

Instruction:

Major topics include: history and approaches; biological bases of behavior; sensation and perception; states of consciousness; learning; cognition; motivation and emotion; developmental psychology; personality; social psychology; psychological disorders and health; psychological treatments; and statistics, tests, and measurement.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16) (04/22 revalidation).

Length:

27 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare and contrast the different theoretical approaches to human growth and development, including those of Freud, Erikson, and Piaget; analyze research methods used in the study of human growth and development; illustrate how genetics affects intelligence and temperament; outline the role genetics plays in the development of psychological disorders; describe and explain the stages of development from newborns to adults; assess how intelligence changes throughout the life span; describe the stages of language development; model Erikson's stages of psychosocial development; evaluate attachment theory and how it works in infants; and compare and contrast developmental abnormalities, mood disorders, and mental disabilities.

Instruction:

Major topics include: theoretical approaches to human growth and development; research methods and the study of human growth and development; genetic and environmental influences on development; biological development; sensory and perceptual development; cognition and cognitive development; creativity and intelligence development; language development; social development; social relationship development; and atypical development.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaurate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16) (04/22 revalidation).

Length:

40 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:define the main principles of life span developmental psychology, the steps of the scientific method for human growth, and development research, methods, data collection, and ethical issues; explain significant psychologist's theories on development, classical and operant conditioning, social-cognitive learning theories, and theories of adult development; summarize the basic concepts of genetics, including chromosomes, sex-linked and limited traits, natural selection, inheritance, adaptation, and gene-environment interaction; describe the processes of conception, fertilization, ovulation, how an embryo develops, how certain factors affect prenatal growth, genetic assessment, perinatal and neonatal environments, potential hazards during the birth process, the process and methods of childbirth, and complications associated with birth; discuss principles of growth and motor, sensory, and brain development in the first two years; examine physical and cognitive development in early childhood, nutrition, health, safety, and different methods and cultural differences in parenting; analyze physical growth and motor skill development in middle childhood, the importance of health and fitness, how to identify children with a learning disability, peer relationships, and the role of school in development; appraise physical growth, cognitive and sexual development and maturation in adolescents, changes in sense of self from childhood to adolescence, gender differences, and the influence of family, school, and peers; review physical and sexual reproductive changes that occur in early adulthood, the influence of life events, occupation and higher education, social relationships, and gender roles and identity; formulate physical and sexual changes that occur during middle adulthood, limitations and growth in cognition among adults, the big five stable personality traits, marriage and divorce, mid-life crises, and gender roles; and relate factors of living a longer life, including theories of aging and death, physical changes, sleep patterns and health, cognitive development, social relationships, the stages of dying and grief, bereavement, and end-of-life issues and debates.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to human development; research methods for human development; foundations of human development; genetic influences in human development; overview of prenatal development; childbirth and the neonatal period; human development in infancy and toddlerhood; early childhood physical and cognitive development; early childhood psycho-social development; human development in middle childhood; adolescent physical and sexual development; adolescent psycho-social development; early adulthood physical and cognitive development; early adulthood psycho-social development; middle adulthood physical and cognitive development; middle adulthood psycho-social development; late adulthood physical development; late adulthood psycho-social and cognitive development; and stages and psychological impact of death and dying.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16) (4/22 revalidation).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

August 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the field of industrial/organizational psychology, describe what it is, and outline its history, compare and contrast social scientific research methods, and how social scientific research methodology is used by Industrial Organizational psychologists, appraise personnel functions in organizations; examine how jobs are analyzed, how workers are recruited and selected for jobs, how workers’ job performance is evaluated, and how workers are trained; examine psychological states that influence employee work behavior: the motivation to work, the satisfaction one gets from a job, and the stress that occurs because of job demands, relate how workers interact in the formation of work groups and larger work organizations and critique interactions of workers and work groups.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to industrial/organizational psychology; job analysis and evaluation methods; employee selection: recruiting and interviewing; performance management: evaluating employee performance; employee training and development; employee motivation, satisfaction and commitment; the psychology of employee engagement; leadership and conflict in the workplace; the psychology of groups; teamwork and teams in the workplace; organizational development and change; workplace psychological health; and research methods in industrial/organizational psychology.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/17).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2012 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the theoretical explanations for understanding personality development, describe their historical underpinnings and the founding theorist(s) associated with each; critique each personality theory and identify the most appropriate situation for employing each theory; judge individuals' personalities using various personality assessment tools to include the TAT, ACT, Myers-Briggs, and Disc; differentiate approaches that psychology has developed for understanding personality to include humanistic, trait theory, socio-cognitive, behavioral, psycho-dynamic and psychoanalytic; and differentiate between race, culture, religion and ethnicity and describe the influence each one has on personality.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to personality psychology, personality research and assessment, psychoanalytic theories of personality, Adler and Jung and personality theory, neo-analytic and ego approaches to identity, biological aspects of personalities, psycho-dynamic theories and theorists, behavioral and learning theories and personality, cognitive and existential theories and personality, humanistic theories and theorists, and trait aspects of personality.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/17).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

August 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: chronicle the history of modern psychology using the process of historiography, examine the history of the care of America's mentally ill, including the evolution of mental asylums and the growth of American psychiatry, critique the philosophical and physiological viewpoints that led to the birth of the "new" psychology in Germany, compare and contrast the major systems (or schools) of psychology, namely structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, and Gestalt psychology, appraise the history of the science of psychology and the history of psychological practice in America, focusing on four applied specialties: clinical, counseling, industrial/organizational, and school psychology, judge the accomplishments of the first generation of American women psychologists, including the relevance to the history of psychology.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: studying the history of psychology; philosophical influences on psychology; physiological influences on psychology; women and ;minorities in psychology; the new psychology; structuralism in psychology; antecedent influences on functionalism; development of functionalism; applied psychology; antecedent influences on behaviorism; development of behaviorism; evolution of behaviorism; gestalt psychology; important theories in psychoanalysis; and contemporary developments in psychology.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/17). 


Length:

28 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: review the definition of sociology, types of research methods, some basic theories and perspectives, including the work of Mark, Weber, Durkheim and DuBois; interpret what culture is and identify social roles in a culture; summarize theories of how individuals develop socially through perspectives from Freud, Piaget, Kohlberg, Gilligan, Mead and Erikson; distinguish how social groups form and the characteristics of these groups; identify why diversity is important to a society, and explore how it may sometimes be harmful to a society; outline the role gender, race, and ethnicity plays in individuals and society and learn about the role of sex in society; define the effects that aging has on society and individuals; relate the links between the economy, politics and society through studying topics that include the evolution of the economy, political parties, labor unions and social power; examine a range of social institutions, such as family units, religious groups, schooling and healthcare systems, to see how these groups play a role in society; and show how a society changes over time including the role of collective behavior, social movements and population growth.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to sociology; the basics; key sociology theorists; sociology research methods; foundations of society; theories of individual social development; social groups and organizations; diversity in society; sex and gender in society; race and ethnicity in society; aging in society; economics and politics; and social institutions.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology (12/16) (04/22 revalidation).

Length:

35 hours (20 weeks).

Dates:

April 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: assess how different perspectives influence society’s definition of aging; evaluate global population trends among older adults, taking into consideration gender, racial, ethnic, and location differences; identify different issues related to gerontological research, including different research tools, measurements, and methodologies, as well as different risks and special considerations for research with elderly populations; summarize the impact of biological aging on health, wellness, and susceptibility to different chronic diseases; compare different models of personality among aging adults, including Havinghurt’s model, the five-factor model, and the Neo-Freudian perspective; analyze how memory, cognition, intelligence, and creativity change with age; explain the risks of mental illness and substance abuse for older adults; describe and evaluate different ways in which aging affects the senses; identify common social and career changes that occur in later adulthood, and summarize how these changes affect older adults and steps they can take to maintain fulfillment later in life; break down the five stages of death and bereavement.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: Basics of Gerontology; Research Design for Gerontology; Demographics of Aging; Physical Health in Older Adults; Muscular, Skeletal and Integumentary Systems in Older Adults; Circulatory and Respiratory Systems in Older Adults; Cognition, Attention and Memory in Older Adults; Intelligence and Creativity in Aging Populations; Mental Health and Lifespan Development Disorders; Cognitive Disorders in Aging Populations; Personality in Older Adulthood; Mental Health Treatment for Older Adults; Social Implications for Older Adults; Interpersonal Relationships in Aging Populations; Finance and Aging; Employment in Late Adulthood; Leisure and Community Involvement in Retirement; Political Issues for Aging Populations; Death and Bereavement in Aging Populations; Nervous and Sensory Systems in Older Adults.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Services, Social Sciences, or as an elective in Diversity/Inclusion (4/17).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2012 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze theoretical explanations of work; explain how work and the workplace have evolved over time; analyze factors that contribute to stress, conflict, and inequality in the workplace; apply sociological theories to mitigate conflict in the workplace; assess the impact of organizational culture on performance, productivity, and job satisfaction; evaluate the influence of technology and globalization on interpersonal relationships in the workplace.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes, final projects, and a proctored final exam. Topics include: historical foundations of work in sociology; conceptual foundations of work in sociology; social occupations and types of labor; workplace organization and management in society; work and inequality in society; workplace culture; economic trends and us labor; balancing work and family in society; technology and work in society; the impact of globalization on work.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Public Policy, or Interdisciplinary Studies. (12/17).

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