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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Psychology and Sociology - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

34 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2011 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the elements of the study of psychology, including how the scientific method applies to psychology; differentiate sensation and perception; categorize the states of consciousness; differentiate between operant and classical conditioning and examine famous experiments that contributed to understanding of conditioning; evaluate how memory is stored and categorized; interpret the contributions of developmental psychologists, including Piaget and Kohlberg; analyze Freud's theories of psycho-sexual development and defense mechanisms; evaluate concepts of social psychology, including stereotypes and attraction; diagram and explain different types of psychological disorders, including anxiety and mood disorders; and outline the basics of statistics, tests, and measurement used in psychology.

Instruction:

Major topics include: history and approaches; biological bases of behavior; sensation and perception; states of consciousness; learning; cognition; motivation and emotion; developmental psychology; personality; social psychology; psychological disorders and health; psychological treatments; and statistics, tests, and measurement.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

27 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: diagram the process of information processing; model strategies for advancing creativity and problem solving in a learning environment; diagram and assess the different stages of child and adolescent development; outline the zone of proximal development; diagram and explain Maslow's hierarchy of needs; compare and contrast methods of measuring intelligence; illustrate the impact and outline the types of learning disabilities in children; compare and contrast the different types of assessments used in learning, including advantages, disadvantages, and reliability; identify and differentiate between different instructional strategies and classroom management techniques; and analyze and describe Bloom's Taxonomy.

Instruction:

Major topics include: history and educational aims; cognitive perspective in psychology; behavioral perspective in psychology; developmental psychology in children and adolescents; motivation in learning; individual differences in children; assessments of learning; instructional pedagogy; and research design and analysis.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

27 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare and contrast the different theoretical approaches to human growth and development, including those of Freud, Erikson, and Piaget; analyze research methods used in the study of human growth and development; illustrate how genetics affects intelligence and temperament; outline the role genetics plays in the development of psychological disorders; describe and explain the stages of development from newborns to adults; assess how intelligence changes throughout the life span; describe the stages of language development; model Erikson's stages of psychosocial development; evaluate attachment theory and how it works in infants; and compare and contrast developmental abnormalities, mood disorders, and mental disabilities.

Instruction:

Major topics include: theoretical approaches to human growth and development; research methods and the study of human growth and development; genetic and environmental influences on development; biological development; sensory and perceptual development; cognition and cognitive development; creativity and intelligence development; language development; social development; social relationship development; and atypical development.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaurate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

24 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and summarize social psychology; compare and contrast the work of social psychology researchers, including Lewin, Milgram, Asch, Zimbardo, and Elliot; outline the types of research used in the social psychology field; model and appraise memory tools, including schemas; analyze the role of emotions in attitudes; appraise how people work in groups and make group decisions; interpret the theories related to attraction; outline and explain the ideas of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination; examine the misinformation effect; and summarize perceived helplessness.

Instruction:

Major topics include: research methods and ethics; social cognition and perception; the self in a social context; attitudes and persuasion; group decisions; attraction and close relationships; stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination; and applied social psychology.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

35 hours (7 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain why research is done and what makes high quality research; examine the concerns involved when using human participants in research, such as informed consent, protection from harm and maintaining privacy; describe how to structure a research project, from selecting the right problem to research to figuring out the right data collection technique; compare and analyze different types of experiments, surveys, content analysis, statistics, and field research; analyze non-experimental research to learn about its purpose, survey research, correlational research and the relationship between variables; investigate types of qualitative research design, such as case study, ethnographic, historical research, grounded theory and phenomenological; discuss developmental research and ex post facto, longitudinal, cross-sectional, and pretest/posttest design; examine experimental design to learn about measurement types, variables (continuous and discrete), random assignment, control groups, factorial design, sampling and sampling methods; review frequency distributions, measure of central tendency, measures of variability, inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, chi-squared test and analysis of variance (ANOVA); and examine what external and internal validity is, variables that affect them, drawing conclusions based on internal validity, limits to generalization of a research study and interpreting a non-significant outcome.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to research methods; principles of ethical research; setting up the research study; data collection techniques in psychology; non- experimental research; qualitative research methods and design; quasi-experimental research; sampling and generalization; measurement in research; internal validity in research; external validity; experimental design; descriptive statistics in psychology; inferential statistics in psychology; and evaluating research findings.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semeser hours in Psychology (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

35 hours (7 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain why research is done and what makes high quality research; examine the concerns involved when using human participants in research, such as informed consent, protection from harm and maintaining privacy; describe how to structure a research project, from selecting the right problem to research to figuring out the right data collection technique; compare and analyze different types of experiments, surveys, content analysis, statistics, and field research; analyze non-experimental research to learn about its purpose, survey research, correlational research and the relationship between variables; investigate types of qualitative research design, such as case studies, ethnographic, historical research, grounded theory and phenomenological; discuss developmental research and ex- post facto, longitudinal, cross-sectional, and pretest-posttest design; examine experimental design to learn about measurement types, variables (continuous and discrete), random assignment, control groups, factorial design, sampling and sampling methods; review frequency distributions, measure of central tendency, measures of variability, inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, chi-squared test and analysis of variance (ANOVA); and examine what external and internal validity is, variables that affect them, drawing conclusions based on internal validity, limits to generalization of a research study and interpreting a non-significant outcome.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to research methods; principles of ethical research; setting up the research study; data collection techniques in psychology; non-experimental research; qualitative research methods and design; quasi-experimental research; sampling and generalization; measurement in research; internal validity in research; external validity; experimental design; descriptive statistics in psychology; inferential statistics in psychology; and evaluating research findings.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

40 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:define the main principles of life span developmental psychology, the steps of the scientific method for human growth, and development research, methods, data collection, and ethical issues; explain significant psychologist's theories on development, classical and operant conditioning, social-cognitive learning theories, and theories of adult development; summarize the basic concepts of genetics, including chromosomes, sex-linked and limited traits, natural selection, inheritance, adaptation, and gene-environment interaction; describe the processes of conception, fertilization, ovulation, how an embryo develops, how certain factors affect prenatal growth, genetic assessment, perinatal and neonatal environments, potential hazards during the birth process, the process and methods of childbirth, and complications associated with birth; discuss principles of growth and motor, sensory, and brain development in the first two years; examine physical and cognitive development in early childhood, nutrition, health, safety, and different methods and cultural differences in parenting; analyze physical growth and motor skill development in middle childhood, the importance of health and fitness, how to identify children with a learning disability, peer relationships, and the role of school in development; appraise physical growth, cognitive and sexual development and maturation in adolescents, changes in sense of self from childhood to adolescence, gender differences, and the influence of family, school, and peers; review physical and sexual reproductive changes that occur in early adulthood, the influence of life events, occupation and higher education, social relationships, and gender roles and identity; formulate physical and sexual changes that occur during middle adulthood, limitations and growth in cognition among adults, the big five stable personality traits, marriage and divorce, mid-life crises, and gender roles; and relate factors of living a longer life, including theories of aging and death, physical changes, sleep patterns and health, cognitive development, social relationships, the stages of dying and grief, bereavement, and end-of-life issues and debates.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to human development; research methods for human development; foundations of human development; genetic influences in human development; overview of prenatal development; childbirth and the neonatal period; human development in infancy and toddlerhood; early childhood physical and cognitive development; early childhood psycho-social development; human development in middle childhood; adolescent physical and sexual development; adolescent psycho-social development; early adulthood physical and cognitive development; early adulthood psycho-social development; middle adulthood physical and cognitive development; middle adulthood psycho-social development; late adulthood physical development; late adulthood psycho-social and cognitive development; and stages and psychological impact of death and dying.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

30 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explore the field of gerontology and the definitions of age; examine psychological and psycho-social theories and models of aging, stereotypes associated with older adults, and demographics of the aging population; go through a basic introduction to personality; delve into the five-factor model of dispositional traits; survey and compare Neugarten's personality styles, Erikson's stages of identity formation, Jung's personality theories, Levinson's stages of adult development, and Freud's psychoanalytic theory; look at common physical, psychological, and emotional changes occurring in late adulthood; identify fitness concerns, factors influencing longevity, and causes of disability, morbidity, and mortality; explore health treatment options, medications, and costs; identify differences between disease and aging, and note the trends related to health and illness; examine the parts of the brain and note the age-related changes occurring in the brain's autonomic nervous system, neurons, and neurotransmitters; learn how these changes affect emotional and cognitive processing and discover ways exercise benefits the brain; compare the STAC and HAROLD models of activation; go over bilateral activation and dopaminergic system changes; get an overview of how aging affects the hair, skin, and voice; study skin layers, muscle tissue, and muscle function before examining the extent to which mobility and build change with age; analyze the functions of both the major skeletal muscle and the skeletal system; see how physical changes to personal appearance affect self-concepts; explore changes to sleep patterns and physical appearance during late adulthood; begin with an overview of the sensory system and work through the lessons to discover the effects of aging on vision, hearing, taste, smell, and balance; explore changes in motor and sensory skills; review other changes to perception and sensation; go over functions of the human circulatory and cardiovascular systems and discover how they change with age; examine common heart conditions and respiratory diseases; Identify the anatomy of the lungs and airway, as well as the functional changes to the respiratory system caused by aging; review anatomy of the endocrine system and the male and female reproductive systems; study the effects of aging on each system; learn about common chronic health conditions among older adults and find out how they can be managed; identify the influences of family history, genetics, socioeconomic issues, diet, exercise, substance abuse, stress, and sleep on chronic health conditions; research the ways in which attention, long-term memory, implicit and explicit memory, and working memory are affected by the aging process; examine such topics as recall versus recognition, how aging changes memories, and the factors impacting memory; define cognition and then compare Piaget's stages of cognitive development to the changes that occur in late adulthood; learn how aging changes language acquisition, problem solving, and information processing; investigate methods for defining, testing, and researching intelligence; explore intelligence types and the development of primary and secondary mental abilities; learn the definition of wisdom and explore its relation to life experience; survey approaches to psychopathology and mental illness alongside various classifications, approaches, and models to lifespan development disorders; identify factors contributing to life satisfaction among older adults; sort through causes and treatments for generalized anxiety and panic disorders, specific phobias, social phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and trauma-related disorders; analyze causes of substance disorders and dependence on various depressants, stimulants, and hallucinogens, including alcohol, amphetamines, and cannabis; discover the various approaches to treating substance-related disorders; consider the causes and treatment techniques for cognitive disorders, including dementia and Alzheimer's disease; study additional late-in-life disorders, including depression, stress, and anxiety; survey stress, mood, and depressive disorders; examine causes and treatment for mood disorders; explore current theories on stress disorders and go over positive psychology; learn characteristics of such therapies as individual, group, biological, life review, and pet therapies; investigate the effectiveness of various treatment techniques designed for older populations, including sensory training, reality orientation, and remotivation; discover the family relationships, friendships, and love relationships that develop in adulthood; identify issues surrounding marriage, divorce, cohabitation, remarriage, restructured families, and widowhood; examine stages of parenting and grandparenting; establish aspects associated with abusive relationships, including neglect, elder abuse, and exploitation; review the psychological impact of caring for aging parents; review factors contributing to occupational choice; discover how age affects occupational choice and explore causes of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction among older workers; go over Super's stages of occupational development; inspect such concepts as age diversity, stereotypes, and discrimination; learn how work and leisure time relate to achievement in late adulthood; examine factors affecting retirement, the social context of aging, and the challenges of ageism; study the stages of dying and bereavement, the history of hospice care, and the concept of dying with dignity; and explore end-of-life issues and the reaction to death across the life span.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to adult development and aging; personality and aging; health of the aging population; the aging brain and nervous system; effects of aging on skin and body build; effects of aging on the sensory system; effects of aging on the circulatory and respiratory systems; the aging endocrine and reproductive systems; chronic conditions of the aging population; changes to memory and attention with age; cognitive development and aging; overview of intelligence, wisdom and creativity; mental health and lifespan development disorders; cognitive, behavioral and psychological assessments; aging-related anxiety disorders; substance abuse among aging populations; cognitive disorders related to aging; mood and stress disorders affecting the aging population; treatment methods for psychological disorders in adults; relationships in adulthood; career changes over the lifespan; retirement and leisure in adulthood; and overview of death, dying and bereavement.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

August 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the field of industrial/organizational psychology, describe what it is, and outline its history, compare and contrast social scientific research methods, and how social scientific research methodology is used by Industrial Organizational psychologists, appraise personnel functions in organizations; examine how jobs are analyzed, how workers are recruited and selected for jobs, how workers’ job performance is evaluated, and how workers are trained; examine psychological states that influence employee work behavior: the motivation to work, the satisfaction one gets from a job, and the stress that occurs because of job demands, relate how workers interact in the formation of work groups and larger work organizations and critique interactions of workers and work groups.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to industrial/organizational psychology; job analysis and evaluation methods; employee selection: recruiting and interviewing; performance management: evaluating employee performance; employee training and development; employee motivation, satisfaction and commitment; the psychology of employee engagement; leadership and conflict in the workplace; the psychology of groups; teamwork and teams in the workplace; organizational development and change; workplace psychological health; and research methods in industrial/organizational psychology.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/17).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2012 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the theoretical explanations for understanding personality development, describe their historical underpinnings and the founding theorist(s) associated with each; critique each personality theory and identify the most appropriate situation for employing each theory; judge individuals' personalities using various personality assessment tools to include the TAT, ACT, Myers-Briggs, and Disc; differentiate approaches that psychology has developed for understanding personality to include humanistic, trait theory, socio-cognitive, behavioral, psycho-dynamic and psychoanalytic; and differentiate between race, culture, religion and ethnicity and describe the influence each one has on personality.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to personality psychology, personality research and assessment, psychoanalytic theories of personality, Adler and Jung and personality theory, neo-analytic and ego approaches to identity, biological aspects of personalities, psycho-dynamic theories and theorists, behavioral and learning theories and personality, cognitive and existential theories and personality, humanistic theories and theorists, and trait aspects of personality.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (12/17).

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