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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Management (Leadership, Incident Management and Investigation)

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Version 1: 75 Hours (10 Days). Version 2: 90 hours (12 days). Version 3: 112.5 hours (3 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: February 2008 - February 2013. Version 2: March 2013 - May 2018. Version 3: June 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: supervise emergency field command operations and manage comprehensive administrative needs of Emergency Medical Service personnel assigned to the field stations. Version 2: Same as Version 1, additionally, define the usual reader of Bureau of EMS documents; identify the dynamics of scheduling that require planning and frequent review and list factors that require scheduling changes; create a calendar for scheduling of periodic reports including daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual, and intermittent; review attendance records and make necessary corrections; discuss options available to subordinates to avoid sanction status and the role of station officers in providing clear documentation; review and assess a problematic employee's attendance status and present and defend their determinations to the class and a panel of senior EMS Command Chiefs for further discussion and feedback; explain multiple aspects of situational awareness including secondary explosive devices targeting responders, active shooter incidents, and use of apparatus for shielding/line of sight protections/command post;establish effective field communications with Lieutenants and Deputy Chiefs to maintain clarity and accuracy of information; demonstrate competence in live simulations; manage subway incidents, EMS resources at a high-rise building, and MayDay management during a fire scene; discuss critical aspects of leadership conduct and create a list of those characteristics that leaders possess; participate in scenarios that demonstrate quality leadership communications and assertive behavior which will affect ability to project command presence; identify basic resource requirements for Mass Casualty Responses; identify factors requiring extraordinary circumstances (extreme weather, spike in call volume, special events, etc); assume Medical Branch Director responsibilities on arrival and provide clear direction to any EMS member who fails to follow ICS protocols or whose performance falls short of job expectations; review abovementioned errors and utilize Goleman's Emotional Intelligence qualities(self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills); differentiate among motivated (and unmotivated) subordinate officers and develop strategies to promote harmonious working groups and teams; compare and contrast values of the four communication profiles (analytic, driver, expressive, amiable); define advocacy as a field leader and provide rewards for positive performance; define the limits of authority and delegation; discuss benefits of all Leadership styles and their relevance to FDNY EMS officers; discuss strategies for guiding Lieutenants through the evaluation process and common issues in evaluation and helpful steps in preventing unfair evaluation practices; outline expectations for the Lieutenant's approach to their subordinates before, during, and after an evaluation; propose considerations of the reviewer in providing feedback to the rater; differentiate between objective and subjective factors; describe the effects of recency, overemphasis, non-forgiveness, prejudice, favoritism, grouping, indiscrimination, and stereotyping; identify and correct problematic verbiage; discuss general guidelines to fair and appropriate evaluation practices; outline effective communication practices including active listening behaviors, eliminating barriers and providing feedback; describe essential elements of effective communication including knowing your message and recipient, maintaining objectivity and avoiding tangents; cultivate productive and harmonious relationships with superiors through effective communications; build trust with peers and subordinates through professional communications; recognize methods to empower the supervisory team and support their efforts; evaluate command discipline complaint reports while considering the circumstances, past similar episodes, seriousness of infraction, and past adjudication; explore the motivation of the issuing officer, interpersonal communications between officer and member; navigate through the delicate balance of supporting subordinate officers and maintaining strict fairness; clearly communicate behavioral expectations; and describe how to reestablish relationships with employees at the Command Discipline session. Version 3: Students will be able to: explain the task and standards of an EMS Captain; manage and prioritize the administrative responsibilities of an EMS Captain; identify critical thinking and decision-making skills; discuss the importance of effective communication as a leadership trait; recognize the value of active listening; identify the various social styles and how to interact with each style; prepare various FDNY reports in a concise and direct manner; develop strategies to run an efficient EMS Station; review and comprehend FDNY policies and procedures; practice Multiple Casualty Incident command and radio operations; apply concepts of the group project work to complex problems at an EMS Station; implement methods to ensure that station personnel remain informed and motivated; develop strategies to clearly delegate tasks to station officers; analyze various FDNY web based application; and measure performance in a consistent manner for effective evaluations.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: administrative responsibilities during field command operations; investigation and cover reports; leadership principles and practices, including emotional intelligence; reviewing performance evaluations; Incident Command Systems: problem solving techniques, decision-making, and communications; MCI radio reports; proper channels of communication; managing organizational relationships; fleet management; conflict resolution; mentoring; facilitated discussion. Version 2: Same as Version 1, additionally; write reports and perform needs assessments; use computer skills and logistics. Version 3: The course provides several “lab days” which allow students to practice in simulated live drill exercises as well as conduct field rotations to obtain experience from field Captains. The program also includes dedicated time for “project work” so students may complete a project collaboratively which explores ways to improve the FDNY.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services Management, Emergency Medical Services Administration, Public Administration, Fire Science Administration, or Allied Health (10/08). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services Management, Emergency Medical Services Administration, Public Administration, Fire Science Administration, Allied Health, Business Administration, Leadership, or Management (6/13 revalidation). Version 3:  In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours distributed as follows: 6 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services Management, Emergency Medical Services Administration, Public Administration, Fire Science Administration, Allied Health, Business Administration, Leadership, or Management AND 2 semester hours in Communication  (6/18 revalidation). 

Formerly:
Lieutenant Orientation Program-MNG 200
Length:

Version 1: 150 hours (over 4 weeks). Version 2: 202.5 hours (5 weeks). Version 3: 225 hours.

Dates:

Version 1: January 2008 - May 2015. Version 2: June 2015 - May 2021. Version 3: June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and apply the cornerstones of leadership; assess public perception and expectations of their new role; compare and contrast leadership strategies; discuss differences in social and leadership skills; identify expectations and strategies of professional communication; use tactical communication skills to elicit voluntary compliance in difficult situations; define emotional control, deflector phrases and apply these principles in real-life scenarios; use the strip phrase-link word-goal phrase approach; identify trigger phrases commonly encountered with the public and subordinates when under stress; practice active listening skills and attending behaviors; utilize communication techniques to create empathy, regain control, clarity and modification and reduce resistance; describe the four levels of appeal; describe and practice the eight essential steps to communicating with people in distress; compare assertive versus aggressive behaviors; apply adult learning concepts to motivate and eliminate barriers to learning; mediate when needed and evaluate subordinate staff; demonstrate mastery of the new responsibilities and fundamental requirements for success as a Lieutenant; and communicate effectively within proper channels and chains of command. Version 2 and 3: Students will be able to: successfully lead EMTs and Paramedics on the sciences of 911 emergencies in order to facilitate care for the sick or injured; analyze situations and make informed decisions based on the situation; effectively manage any mass casualty incidents, including, but not limited to: fires, car accidents, explosions, or marine accidents; effectively communicate with co-workers, subordinates, and the general public; analyze safety considerations when operating in dangerous incidents; perform administrative functions pertaining to ambulance in-servicing and availability, uniform inspections, and various reports for superior officers; and determine the need for gathering reports when situations arise with crews, patients, and the public.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course combines lectures with scenario-based practice incorporating the basic concepts of The One Minute Manager, by Ken Blanchard and prepares candidates for leadership as well as procedural requirements as lieutenants. Version 2 and 3: This course has been expanded in the following areas: MCI Management curriculum, simulated exercises, small group discussion and workshops on leadership principles. Hours for field rotation and internships have increased. Methods of instruction include: study guides, supplemental readings, quizzes, homework, and updated textbooks.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Management and Supervision or Communications OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management/Supervision or Fire Service Administration and 3 semester hours in Communications (7/10). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 7 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Management and Supervision or Communications OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Management/Supervision or Fire Service Administration and 3 semester hours in Communications (6/15 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, or Management and Supervision and 4 semester hours in Communications (6/21 revalidation).

Length:

Version 1: 192 hours (5 weeks). Version 2: 280 hours (7 weeks). Version 3: 210 hours (6 weeks). Version 4: 280 hours (8 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: January 2001 – December 2002. Version 2: January 2003 - January 2008. Version 3: February 2008 - May 2015. Version 4: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: oversee and coordinate the operations in emergency fire, multiple casualty, and emergency medical incidents and perform the tasks of a middle level manager in the administration of multiple fire companies; demonstrate strategy and tactics of emergency response operations and supervision and leadership skills based upon operational policy and procedures of the New York City Fire Department. Version 2: Students will be able to: deploy, coordinate, command and control fire personnel during fire fighting operations; assess fire conditions and evaluate structural integrity of buildings throughout fire operations; develop proper firefighting strategies consistent with established safety parameters; implement the Incident Command System of control and coordination for operations; determine if the fire was accidental or suspicious; record all pertinent information regarding operations for necessary reports; be aware of hazardous materials and the resources available for mitigation; know building construction as it relates to fire travel and extension in various structures; display proper communications skills between units at the scene and dispatchers; know foam operations; determine effectiveness of on-scene resources and implementation of additional resources to manage the situation; oversee and coordinate the operations in emergency fire, multiple casualty and emergency medical incidents; and perform the tasks of a middle manager in administration of multiple fire companies.Version 3: Students will be able to: deploy, coordinate, command and control fire personnel during fire fighting operations; assess fire conditions and evaluate structural integrity of buildings throughout fire operations; develop proper firefighting strategies consistent with established safety parameters; implement the Incident Command System of control and coordination for operations; determine if the fire was accidental or suspicious; record all pertinent information regarding operations for necessary reports; be aware of hazardous materials and the resources available for mitigation; know building construction as it relates to fire travel and extension in various structures; display proper communications skills between units at the scene and dispatchers; know foam operations; determine effectiveness of on-scene resources and implementation of additional resources to manage the situation; oversee and coordinate the operations in emergency fire, multiple casualty and emergency medical incidents; perform the tasks of a middle manager in administration of multiple fire companies. Version 4: Newly promoted Chief Officers will be able to: perform the role of Incident Commander at structural fires as well as all types of emergency responses; interact with local community boards, the news media, and numerous outside agencies. Additionally, Chief Officers will be equipped with the training and resources to solve problems both routine and non-routine that they will experience in the field through effective use of Fire Department units as well as other emergency response agencies. Chief Officers will be familiar with the various branches of the fire service within the city of New York and will know the capabilities of these branches and how to utilize them as needed. Lastly, Chief Officers will further develop and expand the leadership skills acquired as a frontline supervisor (i.e. Captain and Lieutenant) and apply them to their new position as a Battalion Chief in the New York City Fire Department. Successful completion of the course certifies Battalion Chiefs to serve as liaisons to the New York City Transit Authority.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: the Incident Command System, safety, strategy and tactics, hazardous materials, foam operations, supervision, leadership, and high rise operations. Methods of instruction include lecture, audio/visual material, computer-assisted instruction, case studies, field trips, quizzes, and observations.
Version 2: Major topics include: management, leadership, safety coordination, hazardous materials, foam coordination, high rise and building, Incident Command System: fire investigation; communications, fire fighting strategies and tactics, and coordination of multiple incidents. Methods of instruction include lecture, projects, power point presentations, ride along/mentoring and a final examination. The purpose of this course is to provide rising battalion chiefs with an orientation to a middle manager position in the administration of Battalion Command and present the knowledge necessary to be a commander of fire and emergency incidents incorporating the Incident Command System, and to develop proper firefighting strategies.
Version 3: Major topics include: management, leadership, safety coordination, hazardous materials, foam coordination, high-rise buildings, Incident Command System: fire investigation; communications, fire fighting strategies and tactics, and coordination of multiple incidents.
Version 4: In addition to topics listed in previous versions, Chiefs participate in hands-on training; field trips to new buildings, and complete forty hours of field mentoring. Prerequisite: Students must be FDNY Battalion Chiefs. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Strategic Management of Fire and Rescue Operations, and 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials and 1 semester hour in Leadership (9/02). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category 4 semester hours in Strategic Management of Fire and Rescue Operations, and 2 semester hours in Hazardous Materials (5/06 - review conducted by the American Council on Education).  Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours, distributed as follows: 6 semester hours in Fire Science Administration OR 5 semester hours in Fire Science Administration and 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials OR 4 semester hours in Fire Science, 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials and 1 semester hour in Management or Leadership (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 9 semester hours, distributed as follows: 6 semester hours in Fire Science Administration and 3 semester hours in Leadership or Management (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation). NOTE: This course and Battalion Chief Training Course (listed under Inactive Courses - New York City Fire Academy) are essentially the same course evaluated by two different agencies. Both exhibits have been retained to minimize confusion.

Length:

Version 1: 40 hours (1 week). Version 2: 105 hours (15 days). Version 3: 160 hours (4 weeks). Version 4: 175 hours (5 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: May 2004 - March 2007. Version 2: April 2007 - December 2009. Version 3: January 2010 - June 2016. Version 4: July 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: achieve the goals of the department; discuss the dynamics of leadership; and supervise subordinates as to the best course of action in various emergency and non emergency situations. Version 4: Students will be able to: apply classroom lessons to function safely and efficiently as Company commander (Captain) and as Acting Battalion Chief both administratively and at fires and emergencies; effectively operate various department communication devices; strategically deploy fire companies at fires and emergencies; recognize and mitigate developing dangerous situations; function as Resource Unit Leader; utilize the Electronic Fireground Accountablity System (EFAS); become certified in several areas, including: Incident Command System, International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) course Emergency Response to Terrorism; operate at terrorist incidents; discuss the working of the automatic fire alarm panel and automatic sprinkler systems; explain the utility system infrastructure and operate safely at utility emergencies and fire; describe operation of the Full Operational Capability (FOC) and how it relates to jobs in the field. Students also develop a working understanding of building construction and possible effects on field operations. In an administrative capacity, students effectively conduct various duties of a company commander; carry out administrative duties of a Battalion Chief; conduct effective building inspections and maintain accurate building records; enter responses into the NYFIRS system; withdraw information from the MIRS system; complete four 10-hour days of mentoring and ride alongs with an experienced chief in various parts of the city; and discuss leadership principles and apply them to routine and emergency operations. 

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: concerns of an acting battalion chief; command and control; fire ground/administration; various incident command scenarios; fire ground communication; inter-agency protocols; hazmat overview; Special Operations Command; safety/building construction; leadership; weapons of mass destruction; and terrorism awareness. Version 3 and 4: Same as Version 1 and 2, addit ionally building Inspection process; sprinkler and alarm panels; NIST smoke movement study, expanding ops; high rise operations; use of statistics; counseling and conflict of interest.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Administration or Tactics and Strategies (12/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Administration and 2 semester hours in General Fire Science (11/07). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Fire Service Management, and 3 semester hours in Fire Science, or Strategies and Tactics (6/11 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours, distributed as follows: 4 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Fire Service Management AND 4 semester hours in Fire Science or Strategies and Tactics (7/16 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation). 

Length:

Version 1: 80 hours (10 days). Version 2: 40 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Version 1: October 2010 - May 2015. Version 2: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: successfully manage a variety of fire and emergency situations in the position of a Deputy Chief; recognize the warning signs and causes of collapse and implement appropriate response; effectively communicate with all personnel and other agencies at Incident Command Post; manage radio transmission systems and networks in the event of a major fire or emergency; manage administrative duties involved with deputy chief rank, including Fatal Fire Evaluations; define the role of a Deputy Chief and demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to work at major emergencies and multiple alarms alongside other city agencies and effectively manage major emergencies and multiple alarm fires through simulated exercises.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course combines 80 hours of lecture and scenario- based learning to prepare students for response in actual situations common to the post and duties of a deputy chief. Version 2:  Same as Version 1, additionally, the purpose of this course is to familiarize all students with the role of Deputy Chief. Course curriculum includes lectures, presentations, and past case studies of FDNY major emergencies and multiple alarm fires. Students also review simulated scenarios to emphasize the role of FDNY and the importance of interagency cooperation. Major topics include: Field Communications, Fire and Emergency Scenarios and simulations, Maydays and roll calls, leadership and management, high rise fires, Command and Control, radios and communications, safety command overview, special operations command overview, tactics and strategy, Electronic Fire ground Accountability System (EFAS). 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree OR in the graduate degree category, 5 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Management or Leadership (7/10). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree OR in the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Management or Leadership (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation).

Length:

Version 1: 40 hours (1 week).  Version 2: 48 hours ( 6 days).

Dates:

Version 1: January 2010 - February 2018.  Version 2: March 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify various social styles to better communicate with employees and the public; identify and describe roles and responsibilities of an EMS Deputy Chief; develop and define strategies for effective meetings; understand how to utilize statistics to improve performance; define issues and concerns with Emergency Medical Dispatch and how to improve communication between dispatchers and field units; identify organizational behavior and how to improve it; understand the benefits and limitations of networking for response duties; describe capabilities of Deputy Chief position in relation to Special Operations Command; identify best practices for effective mentoring; develop effective writing and report processing; define leadership principles needed that benefit subordinates; identify the role of an EMS Deputy Chief at special events; and describe proper interactions with OPI and the press in order to benefit the public and the FDNY. Version 2: Includes all of version 1, with additional time for field internship.

Instruction:

Versions 1 and 2: Major topics taught in this course include:  This course is designed for Captains who have been newly promoted to Deputy Chiefs. The course is project-based and conducted mostly in small groups. Major topics include: roles and responsibilities, social styles, effective meetings, radio programming, design and coordination of subway medical plans, emergency medical dispatch overview, networking strategies, leadership roles, live drills/simulations, mentoring, report writing, roles at special events, and media inquiries. Deputy Chiefs make final presentations at FDNY Headquarters. Prerequisite: Advanced Leadership in Emergency Medical Service-Captains Course (MNG300).

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Emergency Management/Leadership or Fire Science Administration (6/15).Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Emergency Management/Leadership or Fire Science Administration (6/21 revalidation).

Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 168 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: November 2003 - November 2008. Version 2: December 2008 - May 2015. Version 3: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: couple advanced management techniques with pre-existing operational expertise to meet the challenges of administering a complex organization; use a solid foundation in proven management principles, leadership and change management, professional communications, conflict management and negotiation, diversity, government and civil service, and resource management and allocation to achieve the goals of the organization. Version 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the strengths and opportunities for improvement in oral and written communication skills and identify specific strategies to enhance these skills; refine interpersonal skills including: self awareness and awareness of others, listening skills, managing conflict and negotiation; review and analyze components of performance management systems and assess decision-making mechanisms within New York City government; analyze FDNY data and operations and consider opportunities for enhancement and improvement to further department objectives; and conduct and complete an extensive departmental project, including design, analysis, presentation, and report.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: strategic planning; measuring organizational performance; public budgeting/ financial management in NYC Agencies / grants process; conducting projects: data analysis, writing, and presentations; conflict and negotiation; communication strategy; leading and managing change; individual and team leadership; work processes; management in a civil service context; structure of NYC government and handling NYC government institutions; building partnerships with community institutions; FDNY in the news; promoting ethical behavior in the public sector; terrorism and homeland security; and career and life planning. This highly interactive course includes group work in most sessions. Methods of instruction include: lecture, individual and group exercises, role plays, case discussions, video clips, and writing assignments.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science Adminstration or Public Administration, 3 semester hours in Fire Science Management or Business Management, and 3 semester hours in Emergency Management or Risk Management (12/04-review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2 and 3: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 6 semester hours in Management, Communications, Public Administration, Leadership, Business  Administration, or Fire Service Administration (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation) (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation). 

Length:

1,453 hours (2 years) includes 413 hours of classroom instruction and 1,040 hours of supervised field experience (minimal) which it broken down to a minimum duration of 173 hours per work experience rotation.

Dates:

June 2021 – Present.  

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss and explain how the New York City Fire Department Bureaus operate and work together to have emergency personnel able to respond to emergencies in and around New York City; describe the history of the New York City Fire Department; discuss and achieve optimal nutrition, and tactical fitness required to be a firefighter; perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation; perform basic first aid procedures; perform fire prevention inspections to ensure fire code standards; discuss and explain fire safety initiatives with New York City residents; install smoke detectors according to building and fire code regulations; identify building construction principles and hierarchy; understand, and identify the dangers of manmade and natural disasters and analyze how the Fire Department responds to these types of events; define leadership, and evaluate leadership styles; analyze use of mental aspects of performance for the military, sports industry and fire service.

Instruction:

The two-year program combines three major components: classroom-based instruction; physical fitness training and supervised field experience through rotations. The classroom-based component includes weekly quizzes, examinations, academic readings and lectures on a range of topics including exercises in team and leadership building. The physical fitness component includes drills and instruction. Firefighting is a physically challenging profession. By introducing cadets to the concept of the “Tactical Athlete” the program l physically and mentally prepares cadets for the demands of the profession. Cadets are educated on the exercise and nutritional components necessary to sustain longevity, effectiveness, and the physical health of the firefighter. The hands-on training component is completed through work rotations to learn how departments relate to one another and to provide optimal responses to emergencies. This component allows instructors to use their extensive topic knowledge to provide direct instruction, allowing the Fire Cadets to build a strong foundation. Cadets gain access to tools and equipment to understand their design and use. Additionally, Fire Cadets visit field sites to develop understanding of the construction and design features of numerous types of buildings such as: the Tenement Museum, the New York City Fire Museum, 9/11 Tribute Center, New York City Transit System, and Madison Square Garden/Penn Station. Upon completing all the academic training hours and maintaining the minimum weekly work experience hours over a 2-year period with passing grades on all quizzes, and exams; satisfactory evaluations on all work experience rotations and passing of Candidate Physical Ability Test (CPAT), the Cadet is a candidate for Certificate of Completion of the Fire Cadet Academy. Upon successfully completion of the Fire Cadet Academy and receiving a Certificate of Completion the Candidate must take and pass the civil service Firefighter promotional exam with a minimum score of 70%. Upon receiving the minimum passing score on the Firefighter promotional exam, the Fire Cadet must complete and pass the Candidate Physical Ability Test (CPAT) which they prepare for in the Fire Cadet Academy.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 35 total semester hours distributed as: 6 semester hours in Physical Education (2 semester hours in Health Science, or Exercise Science; and 4 semester hours in Physical Education, or Health Education); 6 semester hours in Fire Science, or Fire Service Administration; 6 semester hours in Fire Protection Technology; 5 semester hours in Emergency Management; and 12 semester hours in Public Service Administration (6/21).

Length:

Version 1: Course 1 and 2:  41 hours (4 weeks); and Course 3: 36 hours (4 weeks). Version 2, 3, or 4: 137 hours (4 weeks). Version 5: 200 hours (5 weeks). Version 6: 200 hours (5 weeks). Version 7: 240 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: February 1977 - March 1985. Version 2: April 1985 - December 1989. Version 3: January 1990 - January 2000. Version 4: February 2000 - July 2004. Version 5: August 2004 - August 2009. Version 6: September 2009 - May 2015. Version 7: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: The purpose of the course is to provide students with a working knowledge of company-level administrative practices and procedures, company-level procedures for effective fire control, and basic supervisory techniques. Version 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6: Within the context of the fire service, students will be able to: describe the role of the first line supervisor in relation to higher level managers, subordinates, and the public; use problem assessment and incident command techniques to select appropriate firefighting tactics and strategies; describe techniques for managing various kinds of hazardous material incidents; and apply lesson planning and presentation techniques to the dissemination of job-related information to subordinates. Version 7: Includes all the outcomes in Version 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, additionally, students will be able to: demonstrate proficiency in instructor training, management and leadership skills, human resources, and management principles.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: fire company administration, record-keeping, and reporting procedures; evaluation and decision making in fire situations; engine and ladder company operations; supervision, leadership, and personnel management. Version 2 and 3: Topics include: fire company administration; principles of supervision; problem assessment and the supervisor’s role in firefighting tactics and strategies; building construction and collapse; educational methodology; arson awareness; hazardous materials; safety; gender integration; high-rise building fires; the supervisor’s role in counseling subordinates with problem behavior and dealing with critical incident stress. Version 4 and 5: Topics include: fire company administration; principles of supervision; problem assessment and the supervisor’s role in firefighting tactics and strategies; building construction and collapse; educational methodology; arson awareness; hazardous materials; safety; gender integration; high-rise building fires; foam; auto extrication; the supervisor’s role in counseling subordinates with problem behavior and dealing with critical incident stress. Version 6: Includes all topics in Version 4 and 5, additionally, 16 hours of building inspection and 24 hours of tactical training. Version 7: Includes all topics in Version 6. Students who successfully pass both written and practical exams, receive a National Fire Officer Certificate.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate category, 3 semester hours in Fire Administration or Fire Protection Technology (2/82). NOTE: Course 1, 2, and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Supervision/Administration; in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Educational Methodology; in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Tactics and Strategies; and in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials (1/95). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Supervision/Administration; in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Educational Methodology; in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Tactics and Strategies (1/00 revalidation). NOTE: It is recommended that a maximum of 12 semester hours be awarded for students who complete both Fire Supression and Control (FSC 100) and First Line Supervisors Traininng Program (MNG 201). Version 5: Six (6) semester hours distributed as follows: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Supervision/Administration AND 2 semester hours in Strategies and Tactics AND in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Educational Methodology (11/07 revalidation). Version 6: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 9 semester hours distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Supervision/Administration and 3 semester hours in Building Construction or Safety and in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Strategies and Tactics or Educational Methodology (7/10 revalidation). Version 7: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 12 semester hours distributed as follows: 5 semester hours in Supervision/Management, 1 semester hour in Administration, and 3 semester hours in Building Construction or Safety AND in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Strategies and Tactics or Educational Methodology (Fire Service Instructor) (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation). NOTE: This course and Fire Service Instructor Level I (INS 210) overlap in content. Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit.

Length:

Version 1: 70 hours; (14 weeks). Version 2: 40 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Version 1: February 2009 - May 2015. Version 2: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to apply the history of terrorism to identify the sources of current and future terrorism threats; develop appropriate and specific strategic plans to dissuade and respond to future attacks and plan for and respond to major disruptions in citywide systems and to major life threatening events caused by acts of terrorism, conventional, chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear.

Instruction:

Version 1: In addition to lecture, reading, and class discussions, students are required to complete strategic planning projects on a current fire department issue related to terrorism. Topics include: sources and history of terrorism, incentives and causes, Al-Quida and new terrorist threats, means and methods, homeland security and defeating terrorism, and counterterrorism preparedness/strategic planning. Version 2: This course is intended for First Line Supervisors and their involvement with Homeland Security. Methods of instruction include: study guide, supplemental readings outside of classroom time, homework, essay assignments, and class discussions.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate OR in the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Emergency Management or Counterterrorism (7/10). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate OR in the graduate degree category, 6 semester hours in Emergency Management, Counterterrorism, Homeland Security, Social Sciences, Behavioral Sciences, History, or Leadership (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation).

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