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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Special Operations Command (SOC): Rescue

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:
Version 1 and 2: 40 hours (4 days).
Dates:

Version 1: November 2004 - May 2015. Version 2: June 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of this course, students will become familiar with the procedures for Advanced High Angle Rescue Operations and be able to construct high line systems, including anchoring systems and tensioning of high lines using mechanical advantage.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: New York State Advanced Rescue I and II, calculating line length, advanced anchoring, military rigging, construction, tensioning operation, high lines, offset and movable directional advanced rescue skills, and lead climbing for tower and crane rescue. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, video, demonstrations and competency based performance testing.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science Administration, Occupational Health and Safety, Engineering Technology, Rescue or Emergency Medical Services (7/10). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science Administration, Occupational Health and Safety, or Engineering Technology (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation).

Length:

50 hours (1 week).

Dates:

May 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will hone their dive skills and assume an increased role in planning and organizing dives.  Students apply reinforced skills in various conditions of increased difficulty- including: night or low visibility, deep water dives, search and recovery, and surf diving or current diving.

Instruction:

Instruction for the class includes both lecture and practical experiences. This 50-hour course reinforces basic skills, dive planning, dive safety and physiology, skills mastered in Open Water Diver (SOC 251). It also provides an increased role in dive planning and dive practice with an increased degree of difficulty. NOTE: Course requirements exceed the number of dives mandated by National Association of Underwater Instructors NAUI. Prerequisite: Open Water Diver (SOC 251) or equivalent.

Credit recommendation:

Credit recommendation:  In the lower division baccalaureate/ associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physical Education, Recreation, or Fire Science (6/18).

Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 40 hours (4 days).

Dates:
Version 1: January 2001 - August 2007. Version 2: September 2007 - September 2008. Version 3: October 2008 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the procedures for a trench incident assessment and demonstrate the various stabilization techniques used to secure a trench in preparation for an evacuation emergency. Students will also be able to explain various support operations and stabilization systems to safely operate in a trench for patient stabilization and extrication and be able to safely manage and operate in a trench rescue and correctly use the tools necessary to safely perform such tasks.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: trench operations; con-ed vacuum truck demo; skills station assemble; trench panels; set panels in trench simulator; gin pole air bag rigging; t-shaped trench; and panel placement simulator.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Services, or Emergency Management (12/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Management, or Occupational Health and Safety (11/07) (10/08 revalidation) Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Management, Engineering Technology, or Occupational Health and Safety (7/10 revalidation) (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation).

Length:
Version 1 and 2: 40 hours (4 days). Version 3: 80 hours (5 days).
Dates:
Version 1: January 1995 - August 2007. Version 2: September 2007 – May 2015. Version 3: June 2015 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: implement skills to perform the rescue of trapped victim(s) of a structural collapse. Version 2: Students will be able to: make assessments of the different types of collapses; discuss how to stabilize and shore up weakened structures; and perform technical rescue-tunneling and breaching for rescue of trapped victims. Version 3: In addition to outcomes listed in Version 1 and 2, students will be able to: calculate and apply mathematical equations; size up an incident action plan and proper utilization techniques and implement these techniques to support collapse structures to enable safe and search rescue operations in or near a collapse structure. Students also learn about and use heavy rigging procedures to move and/or stabilize heavy objects to facilitate life safety operations.

Instruction:

Version 1 or 2: Major topics include: basic building construction, warning signs and causes of collapse, shoring, collapse rescue methods, initial response methods, concrete cutting techniques, crush injury syndrome, and void search operations. Version 3: This course now includes Advanced Shoring (SOC 306) and teaches students the skills, techniques, and use of tools to function effectively at structural collapse operations. Major topics include: advanced shoring, vertical shoring, rigging equipment and operations, crane/rigging, basic collapse, crush injury syndrome, building construction, and safety. Methods of instruction include: lecture, examinations, case studies of FDNY collapse operations, scenario-based skill evolutions, and team and group activities.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Service, Emergency Management, or Emergency Medical Services (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Service, Emergency Management, Occupational Health and Safety, or Emergency Medical Services (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Fire Science or 2 semester hours in Occupational Health and Safety and 2 semester hours in Building Construction (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation).

Length:

Versions 1, 2, and 3: 40 hours (4 days).

Dates:
Version 1: January 1995 - November 2007. Version 2: December 2007 - December 2012. Version 3: January 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: perform the rescue of a trapped victim of a structural collapse; and mitigate confined space emergencies through the use of knots, riggings, and safe victim hauling techniques. Version 3: Same as in Version 1 and 2, additionally: apply confined space rescue skills to assess and analyze a confined space incident; effectively conduct rescue operations to safely secure and extricate victims; identify various techniques to secure area; and protect rescuers during rescue operations.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2 and 3: Major topics covered in the course include: personal protective equipment; incident command system; confined space rescue hazards; confined space awareness; atmospheric monitoring; rope and other software; confined space knots; lowering systems operations; belay (safety) systems operations; patient packaging; anchoring systems; retrieval systems operations; and mechanical advantage theory applications. Methods of instruction include: lectures, audio/visual material, hands-on activities, practical skills evolution, observations, tests, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Service Technology, or Emergency Management (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education).  Version 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Service Technology, Emergency Management, or Occupational Health and Safety (11/07) (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation) (5/12 revalidation) (7/17 revalidation). 

Length:

Version 1: 88 hours (9 days). Version 2: 80 hours (10 days). Version 3, 4, and 5: 100 hours (10 days).

Dates:

Version 1: May 2002 - August 2007. Version 2: September 2007 - May 2012. Version 3: June 2012 - June 2016. Version 4: July 2016 - May 2021. Version 5: June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: conduct scuba updates for certified divers; teach snorkeling; assist NAUI scuba instructors; supervise students in training; formulate a dive plan prior to entering the water for training and conduct a critique upon completion; and teach in classroom and pool/confined water under direct supervision of a scuba instructor. 

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: Major topics include: the role of the dive supervisor; dive planning; dive management and control; supervision of students in training; boat diving supervision and control; and deep diving supervision of specialized diving activities.Prerequisite: Successful completion of Open Water Diver (SOC 251) and Municipal Rescue Diver (SOC 300). 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Physical Education or Recreation (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Physical Education or Recreation (11/07) (10/08 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physical Education or Recreation (6/11 revalidation). Version 4: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physical Education, Health or Recreation or 2 semester hours in Physical Education, Health, or Recreation and 1 semester hour in Education or Instructional Techniques (7/16 revalidation). Version 5: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Physical Education, Health, or Recreation (6/21 revalidation).

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 120 hours (over 12 days)

Dates:
Version 1: September 2005 - September 2010. Version 2: October 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: provide care in an austere environment; perform a limited access patient assessment; effectively use the Rescue Medic formulary; construct splints for muscosketal injuries in the austere environment; excel in advanced airway management; demonstrate ventilation and ventilator skills; deliver sedation and pain management to entrapped victims; understand the functionality of capnography; and master the Rescue Medic protocols and display the skills necessary to operate safely in trench, collapse, high angle, confined space and machinery incidents. EMS rescue technicians perform special operations medicine in the field in challenging situations such as limb amputations, blood transfusions, advanced ventilator management, and even canine care.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course combines 80 hours of rescue operations training with 40 hours of advanced medical management to enable firefighters to administer medical management techniques during and after rescue operations. Instruction consists of lecture and supervised field work. Major topics include: Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, Assessment, Management, Advanced Medical Skills, Specialized Medical Equipment, and Canine Veterinary Care. Prerequisite: Certification as Hazardous Materials Technician.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Building Construction, Occupation Safety, Fire Protection, Fire Science,  Fire Services Administration, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medical Management, or Health Sciences AND in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Medical Management; or Anatomy and Physiology OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Building Construction, Occupational Safety (maximum of 3 semester hours), Fire Services Administration, Emergency Medical Services, Medical Management, Anatomy and Physiology, Health Sciences or EMS (7/10) (5/12 revalidation) (7/17 revalidation).

Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 40 Hours (10 Days).

Dates:

Version 1: January 1995 - May 2008.  Version 2: June 2008 - May 2015. Version 3: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: safely mitigate emergencies in high angle environment; learn how to access victims in difficult-to-reach locations and package and remove these patients; demonstrate skills necessary to safely mitigate any high angle emergencies to include scaffolds, elevated structures, shafts, and other high angle environment situations.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: rope rescue operations; personal equipment and safety; rope analysis; rescue knots; rescue software; anchoring systems; belay systems; rappel devices/procedures; lowering devices; rappel stations; relay station; pick offs and in-line transfers; patient packaging; patient lowering and raising; M/A (mechanical advantage) systems; rescue evolution-stairwell lowering; rescue evolution-SKED evolution; and stokes basket evolution. Methods of instruction include lecture, audio/visual material, practical evolutions, observations, skills check off, and practical exam.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Management or Emergency Management Services (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education) (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Science or Physical Education (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation).

Length:

56 hours (7 weeks). 

Dates:

January 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, members of Marine Operations will be able to: respond to and mitigate hazardous materials with the Hazardous Materials group; identify hazardous materials, interpret chemical and physical properties and toxicological data, select monitoring devices, appropriate personal protective equipment, and identify appropriate tactics and perform emergency operations safely.

Instruction:

Instruction for the class includes classroom instruction, proficiency examination, and supervised practice. Members learn about various types of marine vessels and the hazards associated with each vessel while also becoming familiar with the hazardous facilities along the city’s waterfront and the tactics required in order to perform effective emergency operations.  This training ensures the safety of the residents and visitors to New York City’s five boroughs.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Hazardous Materials, Fire Science, Environmental Health, Public Health, Occupational Health, or Emergency Management (6/18).

Length:
50 hours (10 days).
Dates:
February 2008 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to safely and effectively plan and perform repetitive dives in contaminated water for purposes of conducting for the purposes of conducting underwater hull inspections and completing maintenance and repairs of FDNY's fireboat fleet; provide emergency assistance (disentanglement) to a distressed maintenance diver, and when necessary, deliver surface supplied air; and provide technical support or augment an emergency dive operation in the form of tender support. 

Instruction:

Major topics include: skin/scuba equipment, equipment maintenance, search patterns, communication systems, night and limited visibility, buddy aid, tows, water entries and exits, victim removal techniques, dry suit fitting/diving, confined space dive, boat maintenance dive, and set up and pre-dive plan. Prerequisites: Advanced Scuba Diver (SOC 253), Municipal Rescue Diver (SOC 300), and Open Water Diver (SOC 251). 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Physical Education, Recreation, or Fire Science (10/08) (6/13 revalidation) (6/18 revalidation).  NOTE: Marine Maintenance and Rescue Diver Support (SOC 252) and Municipal Rescue Diver (SOC 300) overlap in content. The total maximum recommended credit for the successful completion of both courses is 4 semester hours.

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