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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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New York City Fire Department | Evaluated Learning Experience

Battalion Chiefs Command Course (MNG 400)

Formerly Battalion Chief Training RR and Battalion Chief Training Program
Location: 
Version 1, 2, and 3: New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island, New York.
Length: 

Version 1: 192 hours (5 weeks). Version 2: 280 hours (7 weeks). Version 3: 210 hours (6 weeks). Version 4: 280 hours (8 weeks). 

Dates: 

Version 1: January 2001 – December 2002. Version 2: January 2003 - January 2008. Version 3: February 2008 - May 2015. Version 4: June 2015 - Present.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: oversee and coordinate the operations in emergency fire, multiple casualty, and emergency medical incidents and perform the tasks of a middle level manager in the administration of multiple fire companies; demonstrate strategy and tactics of emergency response operations and supervision and leadership skills based upon operational policy and procedures of the New York City Fire Department. Version 2: Students will be able to: deploy, coordinate, command and control fire personnel during fire fighting operations; assess fire conditions and evaluate structural integrity of buildings throughout fire operations; develop proper firefighting strategies consistent with established safety parameters; implement the Incident Command System of control and coordination for operations; determine if the fire was accidental or suspicious; record all pertinent information regarding operations for necessary reports; be aware of hazardous materials and the resources available for mitigation; know building construction as it relates to fire travel and extension in various structures; display proper communications skills between units at the scene and dispatchers; know foam operations; determine effectiveness of on-scene resources and implementation of additional resources to manage the situation; oversee and coordinate the operations in emergency fire, multiple casualty and emergency medical incidents; and perform the tasks of a middle manager in administration of multiple fire companies.Version 3: Students will be able to: deploy, coordinate, command and control fire personnel during fire fighting operations; assess fire conditions and evaluate structural integrity of buildings throughout fire operations; develop proper firefighting strategies consistent with established safety parameters; implement the Incident Command System of control and coordination for operations; determine if the fire was accidental or suspicious; record all pertinent information regarding operations for necessary reports; be aware of hazardous materials and the resources available for mitigation; know building construction as it relates to fire travel and extension in various structures; display proper communications skills between units at the scene and dispatchers; know foam operations; determine effectiveness of on-scene resources and implementation of additional resources to manage the situation; oversee and coordinate the operations in emergency fire, multiple casualty and emergency medical incidents; perform the tasks of a middle manager in administration of multiple fire companies. Version 4: Newly promoted Chief Officers will be able to: perform the role of Incident Commander at structural fires as well as all types of emergency responses; interact with local community boards, the news media, and numerous outside agencies. Additionally, Chief Officers will be equipped with the training and resources to solve problems both routine and non-routine that they will experience in the field through effective use of Fire Department units as well as other emergency response agencies. Chief Officers will be familiar with the various branches of the fire service within the city of New York. They will know the capabilities of these branches and how to utilize them as needed. Lastly, Chief Officers will further develop and expand the leadership skills acquired as a frontline supervisor (i.e. Captain and Lieutenant) and apply them to their new position as a Battalion Chief in the New York City Fire Department. Successful completion of the course certifies Battalion Chiefs as liaisons to the New York City Transit Authority.

Instruction: 

Version 1: Major topics include: the Incident Command System, safety, strategy and tactics, hazardous materials, foam operations, supervision, leadership, and high rise operations. Methods of instruction include lecture, audio/visual material, computer-assisted instruction, case studies, field trips, quizzes, and observations.
Version 2: Major topics include: management, leadership, safety coordination, hazardous materials, foam coordination, high rise and building, Incident Command System: fire investigation; communications, fire fighting strategies and tactics, and coordination of multiple incidents. Methods of instruction include lecture, projects, power point presentations, ride along/mentoring and a final examination. The purpose of this course is to provide rising battalion chiefs with an orientation to a middle manager position in the administration of Battalion Command and present the knowledge necessary to be a commander of fire and emergency incidents incorporating the Incident Command System, and to develop proper firefighting strategies.
Version 3: Major topics include: management, leadership, safety coordination, hazardous materials, foam coordination, high-rise buildings, Incident Command System: fire investigation; communications, fire fighting strategies and tactics, and coordination of multiple incidents.
Version 4: In addition to topics listed in previous versions, Chiefs participate in hands-on training; field trips to new buildings, and participate in forty hours of field mentoring

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Strategic Management of Fire and Rescue Operations, and 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials and 1 semester hour in Leadership (9/02).

Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category 4 semester hours in Strategic Management of Fire and Rescue Operations, and 2 semester hours in Hazardous Materials (5/06 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). 

 Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours, distributed as follows: 6 semester hours in Fire Science Administration OR 5 semester hours in Fire Science Administration and 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials OR 4 semester hours in Fire Science, 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials and 1 semester hour in Management or Leadership (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation).

Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 9 semester hours, distributed as follows: 6 semester hours in Fire Science Administration and 3 semester hours in Leadership or Management (6/15 revalidation). NOTE: This course and Battalion Chief Training Course are essentially the same course evaluated by two different agencies. Both exhibits have been retained to minimize confusion.

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