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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Special Operations Command (SOC): Hazardous Materials

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 22.5 Hours (3 days). Version 3: 24 hours (3 days). 

Dates:
Version 1: January 2002 - August 2007.  Version 2: September 2007 - September 2012. Version 3: October 2012 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the need for decontamination; perform decontamination procedures; administer nerve agent antidote; don/doff all levels of chemical protective clothing; and operate necessary equipment for decontamination.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2 and 3: Major topics include: level of protection; medical considerations; CPC emergency procedures; Mark 1 Antidote Kit; operation of sked; hazardous materials expectations; don/doff CPC level "A", level "B" encapsulated, and level "B" hooded protection; decontamination engine overview; operation of hot water heater; use of power air purifying respirator; operation of decontamination shower; Tokyo Sarin case study; non-ambulatory technician decontamination; and scenarios.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Fire Science, Hazardous Materials, or Emergency Medical Services (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education).  Version 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials, Fire Science, Fire Science Management,  Fire Technology, Environmental Health, Public Health, Allied Health, Occupational Health and Safety, Emergency Medical Services, or Emergency Management (10/08 revalidation) (5/12 revalidation) (7/17 revalidation).  NOTE: It is recommended that a maximum of 8 semester hours be awarded to students who successfully complete Hazardous Materials Decontamination Technician (SOC 111), Hazardous Materials First Responder (FSC 101), Hazardous Materials Technician Level I (SOC 210), and/or Hazardous Materials Technician Level II (SOC 211).

Length:

Version 1: 80 hours (10 days). Version 2: 75 hours (2 weeks). Version 3: 120 Hours (3 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: May 2009 - May 2015. Version 2: June 2015 - Present. Version 3: January 2018-Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the basic toxicology principles and toxicity of the following materials: halogens, hydrocarbons, asphyxiates, radiologicals, organophosphates, blood agents, nerve agents, acids/bases. Describe the need for and the process of decontamination of personnel and equipment; list the common symptoms of patients exposed to different hazardous materials; demonstrate EMS functions of Haz-Mat IMS: triage, treatment, disposition and EMS Control; use the proper donning, doffing and usage of all levels of PPE available to the Level II responder; apply medical care and attend to the disposition and transportation of patients. Version 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe Haz-Tac Operations and the role of a Haz-Mat Medical Technician at a Hazardous Materials Incident; list the company types and roles involved with the department's tiered response plan; describe the components of a decontamination task force; define hazardous materials according to the Department of Transportation; outline the behavior of chemical substances at a hazardous materials release; describe basic concepts and physical chemical properties; describe basic chemical technology; effectively employ the North American Emergency Response Guide and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) guidebooks; outline emergency procedures while wearing chemical protective clothing; explain potential medical hazardous of wearing chemical protective clothing; operate and interpret air monitoring and radiological detection meters; inspect, operate, and explain emergency procedures while wearing self-contained breathing apparatus; match related toxidromes and appropriate treatments for various chemical exposures; identify clandestine laboratories; explain basic radiation principles and the ALARA (as low as reasonable achievable) concept; identify and appropriately respond to CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive) incidents; effectively employ the Hazardous Materials Technician New York State Department of Health's Regional Emergency Medical Service Council protocols; and recognize and appropriately respond to victims exposed to the EBOLA virus disease. Version 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to Identify the basic toxicology principles and toxicity of the following materials: halogens, hydrocarbons, asphyxiates, radiological, organophosphates, blood agents, nerve agents, acids/bases. Describe the need for and the process of decontamination of personnel and equipment; list the common symptoms of patients exposed to different hazardous materials; demonstrate EMS functions of Haz-Mat IMS: triage, treatment, disposition and EMS Control; use the proper donning, doffing and usage of all levels of PPE available to the Level II responder; apply medical care and attend to the disposition and transportation of patients.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course is an awareness level training in decontamination and triage of patients exposed to chemicals. Major topics include: toxicology, air monitoring instruments, radiation survey, chemical protective clothing, and decontamination. Version 2: Major topics include: PPE (Personal protective equipment), SCBA (self-contained breathing apparatus), escape maneuvers, drags, carries, webbing drills, emergency procedures, medical considerations, radiation, toxicology, hazardous tactical protocols, response to terrorist bombings and chemical suicides. Methods of instruction include: study guide, quizzes, final examination, and simulated exercises. Version 3: 

This course is designed for EMTs and Paramedics who have an interest in treating patients at a hazardous materials incident. The course is based and conducted on NFPA Standards 472 and 473. Major topics include: roles and responsibilities,  respiratory protection, chemical protective clothing, decontamination procedures, medical management, MCI management, leadership roles, reinforced with live drills and simulations. Prerequisite: NYS EMT or Paramedic with a valid REMAC card.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Hazardous Materials (7/10) (6/15 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours (total), distributed as 6 semester hours in Hazardous Materials or as 3 semester hours in Hazardous Materials and 3 semester hours in either Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Management, Health Science or Occupational Safety and Health (6/21 revalidation).

Length:

Version 1: 37.5 hours (over 2 months). Version 2: 30 hours (2 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: August 2009 - May 2015. Version 2: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will reinforce skills and knowledge needed to improve and maintain competency of Haz-Mat Technical specializing in the medical management of contaminated patients and will demonstrate mastery of a hazardous materials EMS technician as defined in the National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 and 473 as well as the Fire Department of New York/EMS Operating Guide 106-17. Version 2: Students will be able to: outline the behavior of chemical substances at a hazardous materials release; describe basic concepts and physical chemical properties; describe basic chemical technology; effectively employ the North American Emergency Response Guide and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) guidebooks; outline emergency procedures while wearing chemical protective clothing; explain potential medical hazardous of wearing chemical protective clothing; operate and interpret air monitoring and radiological detection meters; inspect, operate, and explain emergency procedures while wearing self-contained breathing apparatus; match related toxidromes and appropriate treatments for various chemical exposures; identify clandestine laboratories; explain basic radiation principles and the ALARA (as low as reasonable achievable) concept; identify and appropriately respond to CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive) incidents.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course builds on the knowledge and skills gained from Hazardous Materials Medical Technical II (SOC 201) and may include topics such as: respiratory protection, self-contained breathing apparatus; operation of air monitoring, chemical protective clothing, medical management within the hot zone, toxicology, and radiation. Methods of instruction include pre-test, lecture, discussion, case studies, practical exercises and exams. Version 2: Major topics include: PPE (Personal Protective Equipment), SCBA (self-contained breathing apparatus), escape maneuvers, drags, carries, webbing drills, emergency procedures, medical considerations, radiation, toxicology, hazardous tactical protocols, response to terrorist bombings and chemical suicides. Methods of instruction include: study guide, quizzes, final examination, and simulated exercises.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials, Fire Sciences, Emergency Medical Services, or Occupational Safety (7/10) (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation). NOTE: Course is repeated each year; care should be taken not to duplicate credit.

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 40 Hours (5 Days).

Dates:
Version 1: April 2003 - April 2008.  Version 2: May 2008 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: respond to and mitigate hazardous materials emergencies; identify hazardous materials, interpret chemical and physical properties and toxicological data, select monitoring devices and appropriate personal protective equipment, and identify appropriate tactics and perform mitigation and decontamination.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: FDNY tiered response; laws, regulations and standards; recognition and identification; placarding and labeling; chemical and physical properties; toxicology and routes of entry; reference sources; air monitoring; hands-on metering stations; radiation and radiological surveys; selection of chemical protective clothing and compatibility charts; decontamination; response to terrorism; nerve agent antidotes kits; pH and neutralization; containment and confine methods; mitigation techniques; chemical identification strips and papers; and flammable metal fires. NOTE: This course is not a prerequisite to Hazardous Materials Technician Level II (SOC 211).  

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Hazardous Materials, Fire Science or Emergency Management (12/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Hazardous Materials, Fire Science, Fire Science Management,  Fire Technology, Environmental Health, Public Health, Allied Health, Occupational Health, Emergency Medical Services or Emergency Management (10/08) (6/13 revalidation) (6/18 revalidation). NOTE: It is recommended that a maximum of 8 semester hours be awarded to students who successfully complete Hazardous Materials Decontamination Technician (SOC 111), Hazardous Materials First Responder (FSC 101), Hazardous Materials Technician Level I (SOC 210), and/or Hazardous Materials Technician Level II (SOC 211).

Length:

Version 1: 150 hours (4 weeks). Version 2 and 3: 120 hours (3 weeks).

Dates:
Version 1: April 1997 - August 2007. Version 2: September 2007 - December 2012. Version 3: January 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify hazardous materials; interpret chemical and physical properties, and toxicological; select monitoring devices and appropriate personal protective equipment; and identify appropriate tactics and perform mitigation.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: tiered response; response to terrorism; regulations, standards, placards/labels; chemical/physical properties toxicology indices and routes of entry; reference sources; air monitoring; hands-on metering stations; recognition and identification review; introduction to radiation and radiological survey and detection devices; radiological detector operations; hazard monitoring; compatibility chart and selection of PPE; Trelleborg; SKED; Decon familiarization; NST; antidote and patient care; pH neutralization; pH review, spyllfyter, wastewater strip,water-finding paste and paper; M8 and M9 paper Hazmat Smart Strip; GR power demo; GR power; road flare; containment and confinement techniques; biosolve/pyrocool; blood work; and decontamination-trailer. NOTE: This course is not sequential to Hazardous Materials Technician Level I (SOC 210).

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Fire Science Management, Fire Technology, Occupational Health and Safety, Allied Health, or Environmental Safety (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Hazardous Materials, Fire Science, Fire Science Management,  Fire Technology, Environmental Health, Public Health, Allied Health, Occupational Health and Safety, Emergency Medical Services or Emergency Management (11/07) (10/08 revalidation). Version 3: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Hazardous Materials, Fire Science, Fire Science Management,  Fire Technology, Environmental Health, Public Health, Allied Health, Occupational Health and Safety, Emergency Medical Services or Emergency Management (11/07) (10/08 revalidation) (6/13 revalidation) (6 /18 revalidation).   NOTE: It is recommended that a maximum of 8 semester hours be awarded to students who successfully complete Hazardous Materials Decontamination Technician (SOC 111), Hazardous Materials First Responder (FSC 101), Hazardous Materials Technician Level I (SOC 210), and/or Hazardous Materials Technician Level II (SOC 211).

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