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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Emergency Medical Services

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Version 1: 1,115 hours (34 weeks); includes 655 hours didactic, 260 hours clinical, and 200 hours field internship. Version 2 and 3: 1,245 hours (34 weeks); includes 801 hours didactic, 244 hours clinical, and 200 hours field internship. Version 4: 1,100 hours. Version 5: 1,662 hours (40 weeks) includes 912 didactic and 750 field and clinical hours. Version 6: 1,663.75 hours (40 weeks); includes 885 didactic and 750 field and 306.25 clinical hours. 

Dates:

Version 1: May 1990 - July 1993. Version 2: August 1993 - September 2000. (Intentional gap between Version 2 and 3). Version 3: January 2004 - December 2006. Version 4: January 2007 - January 2012. Version 5: February 2012 - June 2016. Version 6: July 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: appropriately assess and correctly treat a single or multiple systems trauma patient in any given situation; appropriately assess and correctly treat a patient suffering from a medical emergency including conditions involving the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, muscular system, skeletal system, integumentary system, endocrine system, digestive system, genitourinary system, and reproductive system; discuss the principles used in treating medical emergencies involving pediatrics, obstetrics, neonates, shock, behavioral disorders, toxicology, alcoholism and drug abuse, geriatrics, anaphylaxis, and infectious diseases; perform the following skills at the appropriate time in the correct situation: airway control and ventilation, endotracheal intubation; intravenous cannulation, administration of medications by intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous route, defibrillation, EKG interpretation, chest decompression, emergency cricothyrotomy, application of pneumatic antishock garment (PASG), fixation and traction splinting, bandaging, spinal immobilization and use of other devices appropriate to the care of the sick and injured; demonstrate disentanglement of a patient, packaging and removal from the scene, radio communications with medical control and use of report writing skills; and discuss and demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job.Students render pre-hospital care at an advanced level. 

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: This program is designed to provide the advanced education needed by paramedics to administer patient care in the pre-hospital setting. This program covers all techniques of advanced emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the paramedic as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries, and application of proper procedures of advanced emergency care. Demonstration, practice, clinical, and field experiences are carefully integrated with the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of six divisions: pre-hospital environment, preparatory, trauma, medical emergencies, obstetrics/gynecology, and behavioral emergencies. In addition, an expanded treatment of anatomy and physiology of the human body systems is included, as is a section on incident command. Graduates of the program are entitled to sit for the New York State Certification Examination and the New York City Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) Examination. Version 5 and 6: All of the above plus augmented instruction in cardiology for medical emergencies and trauma approach with enhanced interactive scenario based activities.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 37 semester hours in Paramedic Science (26 lecture, 6 clinical, and 5 field experience). An additional 17 semester hours is recommended as elective credit in Allied Health Science or as general elective credit (1/91) (3/96 revalidation). Of the 54 semester hours, 3 semester hours may be assigned as Anatomy and Physiology or Human Biology (no laboratory included) and 2 semester hours may be assigned as Medical Terminology.  Further, some colleges with nursing degree programs may consider waiving the first semester of nursing courses up to 7 semester hours for individuals who have successfully completed this program. NOTE: Credit should not be given for this program and the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP) program. However, the credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course. NOTE: (This note applies to individuals who exercise this option before December 31, 1995) Credit in Paramedic Science (37 semester hours) is recommended for study prior to May 1990 if the individual has re certified as a Paramedic after May 1990. Credit for Paramedic Science (37 semester hours) and elective credit (17 semester hours) is recommended for study prior to May 1990 if the individual has re certified as a Paramedic after May 1990 and has successfully completed all written exams required in the FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course offered after May 1990.  NOTE: (This note applies to individuals who exercise this option after January 1, 1996) Credit in Paramedic Science (37 semester hours) is recommended for study between January 1984 and April 1990 if the individual has re certified as an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) IV through the FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) after May 1990. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 37 semester hours in Paramedic Sciences or Emergency Medical Services Technologies (12/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 37 semester hours in Paramedic Science or Emergency Medical Services Technology (26 lecture, 6 clinical, and 5 field experience). Version 5 and 6: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 43 semester hours in Paramedic Science or Emergency Medical Services Technology (34 lecture, 8 clinical/field). An additional 1 semester hour may be used for health and physical education (6/11 revalidation) (7/16 revalidation) (7/21 revalidation). NOTE on Version 4, 5, and 6: Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course (PRH 300), Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Challenge Refresher Course (PRH 300R), EMS Medical Upgrade Program (MUP) (PRH 302), and Probationary Paramedic School (PRH 303) overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 43 semester hours.

Length:

Version 1: 100 hours (2.5weeks). Version 2: 72 hours (10 weeks). Version 3: 64 hours (9 weeks). Version 4: 64 hours (8 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: August 1994 - December 1998. Version 2: January 1999 - May 2005. Version 3: June 2005 - June 2012. Version 4: July 2012- Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe basic human anatomy and physiology; explain the rationale and describe fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient suffering from trauma or a medical emergency; perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clear an obstructed airway; defibrillate a patient in ventricular fibrillation; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock and external hemorrhage; perform immobilization techniques; prepare a mother for cephalic delivery; provide care to a newborn; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging and preparation for removal from the scene of an emergency; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; describe the roles and responsibilities of the first responder in performing both emergency and operational aspects of the job; and demonstrate proper use and care of emergency equipment.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by first responders to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. Instruction covers all techniques of emergency medical care currently considered within the responsibilities of the first responder as well as the operational aspects of the job that students are expected to perform. Demonstration and skill practice are integrated into the didactic instruction. The curriculum consists of two divisions: basic life support and trauma/medical orientation; and three skills areas: patient assessment, airway and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management. In addition, the following areas are covered: CPR re certification, overview of the pediatric patient, care of newborn, neonate resuscitation, rapid takedown, rapid extrication, helmet removal, and defibrillation. Graduates of this course are eligible to sit for the New York State certification examination for First Responder with the capability of performing defibrillation.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care (5/95) (5/00 revalidation) (10/07 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care or Emergency Management; OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care or Emergency Management, and 1 semester hour in Health or Physical Education (6/11 revalidation) (7/16 revalidation) (7/21 revalidation).

Length:

Version 1: 32 hours (4 days). Version 2: 33 hours (4 days). Version 3: 34 hours (5 days).

Dates:
Version 1: February 1997 - May 2005. Version 2: June 2005 - May 2007. Version 3: June 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe basic human anatomy and physiology; explain the rationale and describe fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient suffering from trauma or a medical emergency; perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clear an obstructed airway; defibrillate a patient in ventricular fibrillation; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock and external hemorrhage; perform immobilization techniques; prepare a mother for cephalic delivery; provide care to a newborn; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging and preparation for removal from the scene of an emergency; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; describe the roles and responsibilities of the first responder in performing both emergency and operational aspects of the job; and demonstrate proper use and care of emergency equipment.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: This course reviews the content of the Certified First Responder - Defibrillation (CFR-D) course, updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and covers current trends and issues. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care currently considered within the responsibilities of the first responder as well as the operational aspects of the job that students are expected to perform. Demonstration and skill practice are integrated into the didactic instruction. The curriculum consists of two divisions: basic life support and trauma/medical orientation; and three skills areas: patient assessment, airway and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management. In addition, the following areas are covered: CPR re certification, overview of the pediatric patient, care of newborn, neonate resuscitation, rapid takedown, rapid extrication, helmet removal, and defibrillation. Graduates of this course are eligible to re certify by sitting for the New York State certification examination for First Responder with the capability of performing defibrillation.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care (5/00) (5/07 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation) (7/16 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation). NOTE: Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit for refresher courses.

Length:

Version 1: 264 hours (8 weeks); includes 16 hours of field experience. Version 2: 287 hours (8.5 weeks); includes 14 hours of emergency room clinical experience and 80 hours field internship. Version 3: 247 hours (6.5 weeks); includes 16 hours of field rotations and 80 hours field internship. Version 4: 479 hours (12 weeks); includes hours for EVOC, which is recommended for college credit separately and not considered as part of this credit recommendation. Version 5: 607 hours (17 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: January 1990 - June 1994. Version 2: July 1994 - December 1998. Version 3: January 1999 - September 2007. Version 4: October 2007 - October 2011. Version 5: November 2011 - Present.  

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, automatic external cardiac defibrillation, and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment. Version 2, 3, and 4: Students will be able to: discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized Ambulance Call Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment; demonstrate proper use of semi-automatic defibrillator. Version 5: Includes outcomes covered in Version 4, with the addition of 120 hours which includes medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, plus 37.5 hours of scenario-based training training and physical training. NOTE: Content and scope exceeds state requirements of an basic EMS course.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by emergency medical technicians to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of four divisions: basic life support, trauma care, medical/environmental, and operations; and six practical skills areas: patient assessment, airway management and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management, traction and splinting, spinal immobilization, and shock management. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, pathophysiology, pediatric emergencies, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of the course are eligible to sit for the New York State EMT Certification Examination. Version 2: Same as Version 1; in addition, basic life support includes defibrillation and there is additional emphasis on pediatrics and critical trauma care. Version 3 and 4: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by emergency medical technicians to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which students are expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of seven divisions: preparation, airway, patient assessment, medical emergencies, trauma, infants and children, operations; and six practical skills areas: patient trauma assessment, patient medical assessment, cardiac arrest management, airway management, spinal immobilization, and fracture immobilization. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, critical trauma care, pathophysiology, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of the course are eligible to sit for the New York State EMT Certification Examination.  Version 5: Includes topics covered in Version 3 and 4, plus an added 120 hours which includes medical terminology, anatomy and physiology and 37.5 hours of scenario-based training and 46 days of physical training. NOTE: Content and scope exceed state requirements of a basic EMS course.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division  baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (1/91). Version 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division  baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (3/96 revalidation) (10/01 revalidation). NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Emergency Medical Technician - Refresher Course. NOTE: Credit of 6 semester hours is recommended for study completed through NYC EMS (now FDNY-EMS) between January 1984 and December 1989 if the individual has completed Emergency Medical Technician- Basic Challenge Refresher (PRH 200R)  through FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) and received recertification as a New York State EMT after 1/90. Credit of 3 semester hours is recommended for study completed through NYC EMS (now FDNY-EMS) prior to January 1984 if the individual recertified as a New York State Emergency Medical Technician through FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) after January 1990. Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division  baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (10/07 revalidation). Version 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 10 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health, or Emergency Medical Services; or credit recommendations may be distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Anatomy and Physiology, 3 semester hours in Physical Education, 3 semester hours in Allied Health or Emergency Medical Services, and 1 semester hour in EVOC (7/10 revalidation) (7/16 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation). NOTE: Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course (PRH 200), Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Challenge Refresher Course (PRH 200R), and Probationary EMT School (PRH 201) overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 10 semester hours.

Length:

387.5 hours (24 weeks).

Dates:

January 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: master the skills and knowledge to provide, understand, and show competency in treating patients in the pre-hospital setting; render on-the-scene, immediate medical care to patients in emergency situations, such as motor vehicle accidents and heart attacks; remain calm in a crisis; assess an emergency scene; work to stabilize the sick or injured; perform a thorough and concise assessment of patients and look for signs and symptoms of illness or injuries; control bleeding; apply splints; assist with childbirth; perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); and perform other basic life support procedures.

Instruction:

This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by emergency medical technicians to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which students are expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of seven divisions: preparation, airway, patient assessment, medical emergencies, trauma, infants and children, operations; and six practical skills areas: patient trauma assessment, patient medical assessment, cardiac arrest management, airway management, spinal immobilization, and fracture immobilization. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, critical trauma care, pathophysiology, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of the course are eligible to sit for the New York State EMT Certification Examination. NOTE: Content and scope exceed state requirements of a basic EMS course.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 10 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health, or Emergency Medical Services. Credit may also be distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Anatomy and Physiology, 3 semester hours in Physical Education, 3 semester hours in Allied Health or Emergency Medical Services, and 1 semester hour in EVOC (7/16) (6/21 revalidation). NOTE: Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course (PRH 200), Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Challenge Refresher Course  (PRH 200R) , and Probationary EMT School (PRH 201) overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 10 semester hours.

Length:

Version 1: 91 hours (2.5 weeks). Version 2, 3, and 4: 75 hours (2 weeks). Version 5: 37.5 (1 week) - 75 hours (up to 5 weeks) (Hours vary depending on skill level of students). Version 6: 64 hours (8 days).

Dates:

Version 1: January 1990 - December 1998. Version 2: January 1999 - September 2007. Version 3: October 2007 - October 2012. Version 4: November 2012 - May 2015. Version 5: June 2015 - May 2021. Version 6: June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment. Version 2, 3, and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized Ambulance Call Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment; demonstrate proper use of semi-automatic defibrillator. Version 5 and 6: Students will be able to: identify, assess, treat and transport sick and injured victims in the pre-hospital setting to an appropriate medical facility; perform Basic Life Support skills such as patient Assessment, CPR, Basic Airway Management and oxygen therapy, medication administration, and spinal and extremity immobilization; recognize signs and symptoms patients will be exhibiting in order to properly treat them, if appropriate; conduct a patient interview; prepare a Patient Care Report (PCR); and present the patient and all pertinent information to the medical facility staff. Students are expected to pass the New York State Department of Health Certification Examination.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course reviews the content of the Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course. Instruction focuses on updates and changes in medical techniques and practices, and covers current trends and issues. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of EMTs as well as all operational aspects of the job which students are expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of four divisions: basic life support, trauma care, medical/environmental, and operations; and six practical skills areas: patient assessment, airway management and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management, traction and splinting, spinal immobilization, and shock management. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, pathophysiology, pediatric emergencies, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of this course are eligible to recertify as EMTs by sitting for the New York State EMT Recertification Examination. Prerequisite: New York State certification as an Emergency Medical Technician. Version 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by emergency medical technicians to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of seven divisions: preparation, airway, patient assessment, medical emergencies, trauma, infants and children, operations; and six practical skills areas: patient trauma assessment, patient medical assessment, cardiac arrest management, airway management, spinal immobilization, and fracture immobilization. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, critical trauma care, pathophysiology, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of this course are eligible to re certify as EMTs by sitting for the New York State EMT Re- certification Examination. Prerequisite: New York State certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division  baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (3/96) (10/01 revalidation). NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course (PRH 200). NOTE: Students may only be awarded credit once for this course. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division  baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (10/07 revalidation). NOTE: Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course (PRH 200), Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Challenge Refresher (PRH 200R), and Probationary EMT School (PRH 201) overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 10 semester hours. Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division  baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care or 2 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care and 2 semester hours in Physical Education (5/12 revalidation) Version 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care or 2 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care and 1 semester hour in Physical Education (6/15 revalidation). Version 6: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care or 2 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care and 2 semester hours in Physical Education (6/21 revalidation). NOTE: Course content overlaps with Emergency Vehicle Operators Course (VEH 203) and Probationary EMT School (PRH 201). The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these 3 courses is 13 semester hours. 

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 98 hours (2.5 weeks). Version 3: 112 hours (3 weeks).Version 4: 176 hours (3.5 weeks). Version 5: 217.5 hours (29 days). 

Dates:

Version 1: February 1996 - December 1998. Version 2: January 1999 - October 2006. Version 3: November 2006 - November 2011. Version 4: December 2011 - May 2018. Version 5: June 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: appropriately assess patients; make appropriate treatment decisions; make appropriate transportation decisions; and record a detailed log of all field activities. Version 5: Same as Version 1, 2, 3, and 4, additionally, operate within the regional medical protocols published by the New York City Regional Emergency Medical Advisory Council providing agressive pre-hospital care using current pharmacological forumulary. 

Instruction:

Version 1: This course is designed for individuals employed by FDNY-EMS Academy as EMTs who have completed paramedic training outside the Department and are about to begin working as paramedics. The course covers Advanced Life Support (ALS) equipment inventory, ALS assessment principles, ALS documentation, introduction to FDNY-EMS ALS operations, issues of quality assurance, paramedic roles and responsibilities in FDNY-EMS as presented by the Medical Director of Training and Telemetry Rotation. The course includes lecture; scenario testing, involving medical, trauma, and cardiac arrest scenarios in a simulated clinical setting before and following the field component; a field component involving the course participant as a member of a paramedic unit in the field; a field diary, including properly formatted patient assessment, histories, presumptive diagnoses, treatments, and follow-up at the emergency department; and case study presentations, for which course participants prepare a research paper on an advanced level medical condition or treatment modality for peer presentation and critique. Prerequisite: New York State certification as a Paramedic. Version 2, 3, 4, and 5: This course covers Advanced Life Support (ALS) equipment inventory, ALS assessment principles, ALS documentation, introduction to FDNY-EMS ALS operations, issues of quality assurance, paramedic roles and responsibilities in FDNY-EMS. The course includes lecture; scenario testing, involving medical, trauma, and cardiac arrest scenarios in a simulated clinical setting before and following the field component; a field component involving the course participant as a member of a paramedic unit in the field; a field diary, including properly formatted patient assessment, histories, presumptive diagnoses, treatments, and follow-up at the emergency department; and case study presentations, for which course participants prepare a research paper on an advanced level medical condition or treatment modality for peer presentation and critique. Prerequisite: New York State Paramedic certification.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (3/96) (10/01 revalidation). NOTE: Credit should not be given for this course and the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course (PRH 300). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (10/07 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 9 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (6/11 revalidation) (6/18 revalidation). Version 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 11 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (6/18 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation). NOTE: On Version 3 and 4: Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course (PRH 300), Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Challenge Refresher Course (PRH 300R), EMS Medical Upgrade Program (MUP) (PRH 302) and Probationary Paramedic School (PRH 303) overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 43 semester hours.

Length:

Version 1: 140 hours (4 weeks). Version 2: 112.5 hours (3 weeks).Version 4: 144 hours (18 days). Version 5: 37.5-75 hours. (Hours vary depending on skill level of students). 

Dates:

Version 1: May 1990 - December 1998.Version 2: January 1999 - October 2006. Version 3: November 2006 - November 2011. Version 4: December 2011 - May 2015. Version 5: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: appropriately assess and correctly treat a single or multiple systems trauma patient in any given situation; appropriately assess and correctly treat a patient suffering from a medical emergency including conditions involving the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, muscular system, skeletal system, integumentary system, endocrine system, digestive system, genitourinary system, and reproductive system; discuss the principles used in treating medical emergencies involving pediatrics, obstetrics, neonates, shock, behavioral disorders, toxicology, alcoholism and drug abuse, geriatrics, anaphylaxis, and infectious diseases; perform the following skills at the appropriate time in the correct situation: airway control and ventilation, endotracheal intubation; intravenous cannulation, administration of medications by intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous route, defibrillation, EKG interpretation, chest decompression, emergency cricothyrotomy, application of pneumatic anti shock garment (PASG), fixation and traction splinting, bandaging, spinal immobilization and use of other devices appropriate to the care of the sick and injured; demonstrate disentanglement of a patient, packaging and removal from the scene, radio communications with medical control and use of report writing skills; discuss and demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job. Version 5: Includes previous outcomes covered in Version 1, 2, 3, and 4, additionally, utilize skills relearned during class; evaluate patients and diagnose life threatening or life altering illness or injury and employ the necessary skills to correct the problem; evaluate the patient’s condition, implement a care plan and communicate with a medical control physician; reconstruct a verbal picture of the patient’s condition and communicate his/her findings to the physician to obtain additional treatments which may be necessary to treat the sick or injured; and recall information that has been forgotten through participating in practical exercises and attending topical lectures.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course reviews the content of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course (PRH 300), updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and addresses current trends and issues. This course covers all techniques of advanced emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the paramedic as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student is expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries, and application of proper procedures of advanced emergency care. Demonstration and practice are carefully integrated with the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of six divisions: pre-hospital environment, preparatory, trauma, medical emergencies, obstetrics/gynecology, and behavioral emergencies. In addition, an expanded treatment of anatomy and physiology of the human body systems is included, as is a section on incident command. Graduates of the program are entitled to re certify as an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) IV by sitting for the New York State Examination and the New York City Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) Examination. Prerequisite: New York State certification as a Paramedic. Version 2 and 3: This course reviews the content of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course (PRH 300), updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and addresses current trends and issues. This course covers all techniques of advanced emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the paramedic as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student is expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries, and application of proper procedures of advanced emergency care. Demonstration and practice are carefully integrated with the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of nine divisions: preparatory, airway management, patient assessment, trauma, medical, special considerations, assessment based management, operations. Version 4: In addition, an expanded treatment of anatomy and physiology of the human body systems is included, as is a section on incident command. Graduates of the program are entitled to re certify as an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) IV by sitting for the New York State Examination and the New York City Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) Examination. Prerequisite: New York State certification as a Paramedic. Version 5: Students are expected to complete approximately 76 hours on out of class assignments, including 40 hours of readings and 36 hours of journal writing. Methods of instruction include: study guide, required and supplemental readings, journal entries, quizzes, and completion of New York State Department of Health practical skills examination and written examination. Prerequisite: New York State certification as a Paramedic.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (3/96). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (10/01 revalidation). NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course (PRH 300). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science. NOTE on Version 3 and 4: Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course (PRH 300), Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Challenge Refresher Course (PRH 300R), EMS Medical Upgrade Program (MUP) (PRH 302) and Probationary Paramedic School (PRH 303) overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 43 semester hours. (10/07 revalidation). Version 4 and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (6/11 revalidation) (6/15 revalidation) (6/21 revalidation).

Length:

Time requirements vary depending upon background of class participants. EMT-TOP (for individuals being hired by FDNY-EMS Academy as EMTs who received their EMT training elsewhere): Version 1: 97.5 hours (13 days). Instructional time does not include refresher time for Emergency Vehicle Operators Course (EVOC) (VEH 203). Credit is recommended for EVOC separately. Version 2: 337 hours (46 days).  Instructional time includes refresher hours and EVOC hours. Credit is recommended for EVOC separately and Refresher separately; therefore, please refer to the explanatory note at the end of this exhibit. Version 3: 360 hours (48 consecutive days). Version 4: 477 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: January 1984 - September 2006. Version 2: October 2006 - October 2011. Version 3: November 2011- June 2016. Version 4: July 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a standardized patient care report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; properly use and care for emergency equipment; operate safely at track rescues; identify, discuss, and function under multiple casualty incident conditions; categorize, treat, and transport a patient at the scene of a multi-casualty incident; recognize unsafe conditions at the scene of all calls and make proper decisions to ensure personnel safety; transfer, lift, and transport patients in all types of carrying devices; take necessary blood borne pathogens precautions; recognize and identify hazardous materials or potentials thereof; use the proper techniques of infectious waste disposal and personal protection in cases of known and unknown communicable diseases; identify and discuss Right to Know Law and how it operates; and apply and function under the operating guide procedures.Version 4: Students will be able to: outline and discuss FDNY operating guide procedures and protocols for New York City; become qualified on operating department vechicles (according to Vehicle Traffic Laws and department guidelines); effectively integrate all aspects of patient care in a simulated pre-hosptial setting by assimilating practical skills and knowledge together to evaluate and treat simulated patients during various case presentations; review proper lifting techniques with patients and equipment to minimize injury and ensure safe transport. At the conclusion of this refresher program, students will have received required training to successful sit for the NYS certifying exam for Emergency Medical Technician. 

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: This program is designed to provide a bridge between training programs and work in the field, as well as an orientation to FDNY-EMS policies and procedures. Topics include: program orientation; medical-legal, patient assessment; vital signs; anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular emergencies; respiratory anatomy and physiology; respiratory emergencies; soft tissue injuries; shock and MAST; head, neck, and spine injuries; chest, abdomen, and groin injuries; communicable and infectious disease control procedures; extremity trauma; medical emergencies; ambulance operations; patient care documentation and history taking; domestic violence; environmental emergencies; critical incident stress management; trauma intervention; stress and burnout; behavioral emergencies; triage (simple triage and rapid treatment); IV (interavenous) maintenance; emergency medical action plan; multiple casualty incidents; track safety; hazardous materials awareness; blood borne pathogens; AIDS and HIV awareness; on-scene personnel safety; pediatric emergencies; OB/GYN lifts and carries; kinematics; EMT-Defibrillation; critical trauma care; airway maintenance and oxygen therapy; history taking; FDNY-EMS operating guide procedures; communications orientation; special operations; respiratory fit testing; Right to Know; personnel and union representatives issues. Prerequisite: Employment with FDNY-EMS as a New York State certified EMT and a valid NYS driver's license. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences or Emergency Health Sciences (3/96) (10/01 revalidation). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences or Emergency Health Sciences (10/07 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours as follows:  2 semester hours in Physical Education, 1 semester hour in Emergency Vehicle Operation, 2 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health, and Emergency Medical Services (6/11 revalidation). NOTE: Rather than deduct the instructional hours for Emergency Vehicle Operators Course (EVOC) (VEH 203) and EMT Basic Challenge Refresher (PRH 200R), which have separate credit recommendations, the hours for this course and the resulting credit recommendation are reflected in full to benefit those individuals who do not complete these other learning experiences. Care should be taken not to award duplicate credit. Also refer to the next note. NOTE: Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course (PRH 200), Emergency Medical Technician -  Basic Challenge Refresher (PRH 200R), and Probationary EMT School (PRH 201) overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 13 semester hours. Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 10 semester hours as follows: 4 semester hours in Physical Education, 1 semester hour in Emergency Vehicle Operation (EVOC), 5 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health, or Emergency Medical Services (7/16 revalidation).  NOTE: Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course (PRH 200) and Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Challenge Refresher (PRH 200R) overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 13 semester hours. NOTE: Emergency Vehicle Operators (VEH 203) and Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Challenge Refresher (PRH 200R) overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these 3 courses is 13 semester hours. 

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