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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

History and Political Science - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

32 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

December 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:dissect the early history of slavery in the United States in the contexts of economics, politics, trade, and the Constitution; understand the impact of the Abolitionist movement on the culture of pre-Civil War America; summarize the territorial and demographic issues that impacted the U.S. before the Civil War; compare and contrast the works of influential authors during the Civil War; diagram the succession of the Southern states and the formation of the Confederacy; express how politics, economics, African Americans, and women affected Civil War America; analyze and report on the major battles from 1861-1865; consider the roles of important generals and presidents and their impact on the Civil War; evaluate foreign affairs and military strategies during the Civil War; and measure the lasting impact of the Civil War on Americans during and after the Reconstruction.

Instruction:

Major topics include: slavery in the United States; the Abolitionist Movement in America; the Pre-Civil War Sectional Crisis in the U.S.; influential American Civil War writers; rising tensions in Pre-Civil War America; Southern Secession from the Union; politics, industry, and economy in Civil War America; American Civil War Battles in 1861; American Civil War Battles in 1862; American Civil War Battles in 1863; American Civil War Battles in 1864; American Civil War Battles in 1865; important figures in the American Civil War; military strategies in the American Civil War; life following the American Civil War; and reconstruction after the American Civil War.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History (12/16) (04/22 revalidation).

Length:

19 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:dissect how nationalism affected the nation of Vietnam; compare the important figures and events of the First Indochina War; summarize how President Roosevelt, President Truman, and President Eisenhower formed foreign policy during the First Indochina War; evaluate the consequences of the Geneva Conference; explain the Unites States' involvement in Vietnam, including the policy formation of President Kennedy and the plan for withdrawal made by President Nixon; analyze American dissent during the Vietnam War and how this opposition affected policy; differentiate between the many battles and conflicts of the Vietnam War, as well as the tactics behind their operation; summarize and debate how the Vietnam War impacted Vietnam's neighbors; outline the United States' role in the Cambodian-Vietnamese War; and estimate and infer the effects of the Vietnam War, both inside the United States and in Southeast Asia.

Instruction:

Major topics include:Vietnamese nationalism; the First Indochina War; early American involvement in Indochina; the Geneva Conference and the Vietnam War; U.S. involvement in Vietnam; opposition to the Vietnam War; battles and operations of the Vietnam War; participants and strategies in the Vietnam War; Cambodia and Laos in the Vietnam War; and effects of the Vietnam War.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History (12/16) 04/22 revalidation).

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze how antisemitism and Nazi racial ideology contributed to the formation of the "Final Solution to the Jewish Question"; identify the victims and perpetrators of the Holocaust; summarize the major components of the Holocaust, including: isolation of Jews from mainstream society, removal of Jews from society to places such as ghettos, the euthanasia programs, death by mass shootings, death in labor camps and the killing centers, reactions to the persecution and murder of the Jews by non-Jews, and resistance by Jews and non-Jews; argue whether the "Final Solution" was planned prior to the beginning of WWII or evolved over the course of the war in response to the changing circumstances of the conflict; and compare the Holocaust to other instances of genocide (including reactions by the international community) after World War II.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to the Holocaust and World War II, major events and battles in WWII Europe, antisemitism and the rise of Nazi Germany, early persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany, escalation of Nazi persecution of German Jews, mass extermination and ghettos in World War II Europe, World War II and Nazi police groups, Nazi escalation in Europe and the Final Solution, resistance and participation in the Holocaust, the end of WWII and Jewish liberation, and the aftermath of World War II and the Holocaust.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History, European History, Modern German History, Jewish History, 20th Century Europe, or World War II (12/17). 

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2014 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and explain key concepts, terms, and the general nomenclature in the discipline of political science; assess several forms of political organizations that range in scope from the local to international, and vary in classification from public to private to semi-autonomous; analyze the systems that underlies voting and political participation and the dissemination of political power among offices, bureaucracies, agencies, and institutions within government; evaluate the differences between forms of political organization and government type and what makes each unique in terms of their structure and distribution of power; evaluate the evolution of political theories from antiquity to the contemporary age, and compare as well as contrast the diverse array of approaches to understanding political systems; draw connections between socio-economic forces and public opinions, and how these concepts are measured as well as how they manifest through civic action; appraise the relationship between economics and politics by illustrating how policy may impact markets and how trends in the economy can motivate or dissuade government interventions; analyze a variety of international relations theories and compare them to one another while appraising their utility in encouraging diplomatic and economic bonds between states; and break down global political issues and how they are addressed by a developing international legal and regulatory system, while evaluating the role of globalization, wealth inequality, and environmental concerns in these trends.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: basic terms and concepts of political science, political ideologies and philosophy, forms of government, electoral systems, the branches of government, U.S. Federal bureaucracy, the history and role of political parties, interest groups in politics, mass media and politics, political culture, public opinion and civic behavior, public and social policy, fiscal policy in government and the economy, foreign policy, defense policy and government, concepts of international relations, theories of international relations, international actors in political science, international law in politics, global issues and politics, the congress, powers and elections, presidential elections and powers, the federal judicial system, comparative law, civil liberties, and types of legislatures in government.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Political Science (12/17).

Length:

39 hours (8 weeks).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: distinguish between different forms of democracy and the philosophical foundations of American government by examining the spread of democratic ideals and the components of Constitution; explain the evolution of American federalism, the division of power between state and federal governments, and the debate over sovereignty; compare and contrast the history, function and types of political parties alongside their influences on the political process, American political culture, examples of political socialization, and the influence of public opinion on elected officials and weigh factors influencing voter turnout; examine the origin of civil liberties and rights, equal protection, freedom of speech, religion, and privacy, the history of the civil rights movement, and civil rights issues with other marginalized groups; analyze the issues, rules governing historical development, and the influence of the mass media and learn the sources through which Americans get their news; illustrate the structure of federal bureaucracy, the problems associated with it, functions of the cabinet and independent regulatory agencies and explore how bureaucracy is held accountable through the courts, Congress, and the presidency; review contemporary nomination processes, the differences between primary and general elections, sources of campaign funds, the role of the electoral college, factors influencing voters' decisions and follow the evolution of contemporary presidential elections; identify the differences between a congress and a parliament, how a bill becomes law, the reapportionment and redistricting processes, advantage of incumbency in elections and compare the demographics of members of Congress with the populations they represent; summarize the structure of the federal court system, steps in the judicial decision-making process; and generate steps, types and issues with public, social, and environmental policy, economic and fiscal policy, foreign and defense policy formation and implementation and interest group's influence, regulation and strategies.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to the study of American government; constitutional democracy; federalism in the United States; interest groups and American democracy; the media and American democracy; the federal bureaucracy in the United States; American political culture, opinion, and behavior; civil liberties; civil rights; political parties in the United States government; the presidency: election, powers, and practice; the congress: election, powers, and representation; the federal judicial system; economic and fiscal policy; public, social, and environmental policy; and foreign and defense policy.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in American Politics (12/16) (04/22 revalidation).

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