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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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History and Political Science - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

36 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the roots of civilization and how cities and tools were invented; outline the history of the ancient Near East, including the contribution of the Sumerians, Assyrians, and Ancient Egyptians; reconstruct the history of ancient Greece, including Athenian democracy, the history of Sparta, and Homer's writings; diagram Christianity's roots and analyze its growth during the Roman Empire and Dark Ages; analyze the birth and spread of Islam; reconstruct the rise and decline of the Byzantine empire; appraise contributions of Renaissance artists and inventors, including Leonardo da Vinci; assess the work of Martin Luther and the Reformation's impact on Germany; analyze how the Protestant Reformation spread across Europe and its impact on different countries; and appraise the economic impact of exploration and colonization on Europe.

Instruction:

Major topics include: prehistory; history of Ancient Greece; Hellenism and the Athenian Achievement; the rise and fall of the Roman Republic and Empire; the Dark Ages; the Middle Ages; the Medieval Warm Period; the Renaissance; the Age of Exploration; the Reformation; the Elizabethan Era; and colonialism.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History or Western Civilization (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

28 hours (7 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare and contrast how absolutism and constitutionalism affected Western Europe and how power shifted in the old empires through Western and Eastern Europe; explain world economies in the 1700s and society and culture of the 18th century; analyze the leaders of the scientific revolution and the enlightenment, breakthroughs within science and the effects on societies and political theory; examine the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon, his reign of terror and the fall of his empire; outline the agricultural revolution, the industrial revolution and the British Reform movement; demonstrate the political developments, such as liberalism, radicalism, republicanism and socialism and the various revolutions resulting throughout Europe and the Americas; illustrate the spread of Nationalism and the second industrial revolution throughout Europe and the Americas in 19th and early 20th century; discuss imperialism in the 19th and 20th century; examine the main causes of WWI and study the famous battles; analyze what happened in Europe and Asia between the World Wars; categorize what caused WWII, why and how America entered the fight, and the development and use of the Atom bomb; and investigate the world following WWII and learn about economic and political reconstruction in Europe, the Chinese revolution and the creation of Taiwan.

Instruction:

Major topics include: Absolutism and Constitutionalism in Western Europe (1648-1715); power shifts in Eastern Europe (1648-1740); empire and expansion in the 18th Century (1700-1799); the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment (1500-1790); the French Revolution and Napoleon Bonaparte (1780-1815); Industrialization (1700-1900); political developments (1760-1848); the Age of Nationalism (1850-1914); European life and trends (1850-1914); Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries; World War I (1914-1919); between the World Wars (1919-1939); World War II (1939-1945); and Western Civilization since 1945.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History or Western Civilization II (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

28 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: outline the major civilizations that lived in North America prior to first contacts; illustrate the impact of initial settlements in North America, including Jamestown and Plymouth Rock; break down the events that led up to the American Revolution; diagram and explain the major events and significance of the American Revolution; identify and appraise the major elements of the Declaration of Independence; analyze the major elements of the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights; compare and contrast life in the north and south prior to the Civil War; explain the causes of westward expansion, including the California Gold Rush; categorize the causes and effects of the Civil War; and describe the main elements of Reconstruction and how it affected the country.

Instruction:

Major topics include: first contacts; settling North America; the American Revolution; the Constitution and Bill of Rights; the Virginia Dynasty; Jacksonian Democracy; Antebellum America; Manifest Destiny; Sectional Crisis; Civil War; and Reconstruction.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degre category, 3 semester hours in History (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

28 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: outline the cause of Reconstruction, the additions of the 13-15th amendment, conflicts with Native Americans and the spread of Urbanization and Industrialization throughout the 19th and 20th century; compare and contrast how the government worked to improve daily life at work, for African-Americans, the suffragette movement, and how American imperialism spread throughout the world in the late 19th and early 20th century; break down life and culture in the 20's, how it led to the Wall Street crash of 1929, the resulting Great Depression and how America emerged; identify the causes and major events of World War II, and the event of the Atom Bomb; examine Europe, Asia, the Soviet Union and America after the war; take a look at American post-war politics, life and culture; investigate the Cold, Korean and Vietnam War, McCarthyism, the Space Race, and the presidencies of Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy; analyze President Johnson, the civil rights movement, hippies, student activism, and the feminist movement; appraise the presidencies of Nixon, Ford, and Carter and events in the Middle East, Roe versus Wade and the Watergate scandal; illustrate the presidencies of Ronald Reagan and George Bush Sr. and the events that occurred during their presidencies; and assess the U.S since 1992 including the presidencies of William Jefferson Clinton, George Bush, and Barack Obama.

Instruction:

Major topics include Reconstruction and the Gilded Age (1865-1877); Industrialization and Urbanization (1870-1900); the Progressive Era (1900-1917); American Imperialism (1890-1919); the Roaring 20s (1920-1929); the Great Depression (1929-1940); World War II in America (1941-1945); Post-War World (1946-1959); the Cold War (1950-1973); protests, activism and civil disobedience (1954-1973); the 1970s (1969-1979); the rise of political conservatism (1980-1992); and contemporary America (1992-2013).

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

18 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare and contrast the differing views of the government by citizens, the demographic shift through the country, and the commercial revolution in the 19th century; examine rising tension over slavery in the mid-19th century as well as the Mexican-American War; investigate the birth of the Republican Party, the split of the Democratic Party, the election of 1860 and the successes and failures of Abraham Lincoln; illustrate how 11 states seceded to form the Confederacy and how the Civil War began in Fort Sumter; compare and contrast President Lincoln's and Davis's cabinets, Armed Forces and the various battles that took place in 1862; appraise the casualties of war, the role and circumstances of women and African-Americans in the war, and the various battles that took place in 1863; critique Lincoln's re-election campaign, the Overland Campaign, the Atlanta campaign, the march to the sea, and the various battles that took place in 1864; describe the last 100 days of the Civil War, the fall of Richmond, and the repercussions of the war; and categorize Lincoln's legacy, President Johnson's plan for reuniting the US, Republican ideas on reconstruction and the effects of it, the 13-15th amendment, Johnson's impeachment and the election of 1876.

Instruction:

Major topics include life in 19th Century America; rising tension over slavery; the Political Situation in 1860; the Civil War Unfolds 1861; the War in 1862; the War Continues 1863; the tide of War shifts 1864; conclusion of the Civil War 1865; and Reconstruction after the Civil War.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

15 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: illustrate the history of Indochina during the first half of the 20th century, the ascendance of Ho Chi Minh, the foreign policy of Roosevelt and Truman and the First Indochina War; examine Eisenhower's foreign policy, Ngo Dinh Diem's origins, his relationship with the U.S. and the birth of the Viet Cong; explain how Kennedy's advisors helped shape foreign policy during the war's early years, U.S. strategies and discuss the impact of events occurring in 1963, such as Kennedy's assassination; summarize the results of the Gulf of Tonkin Crisis, significant air campaigns, Johnson's decision to put troops on the ground, the first wave of American dissent and tactics employed by the People's Army of North Vietnam and the Viet Cong; categorize Nixon's plan to withdraw American forces and the secret operations in Cambodia and Laos, second wave of American dissent, especially in Congress and the negotiations leading to the Paris Peace Accords; identify early American engagements, the war's only airborne engagement, the North Vietnamese's Tet and Easter offensives and the American-led massacre at My Lai; and appraise the events leading to the Fall of Saigon, the Khmer Rouge's genocide in Cambodia, the communist takeover of Laos, and the impact of the war on veterans and subsequent U.S. foreign policy.

Instruction:

Major topics include: roots of the Vietnam War; unrest in Vietnam during the Eisenhower Years; John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson and the Vietnam War; Vietnam War during the Nixon Years; major battles and offensives of the Vietnam War; and the Vietnam War after American involvement.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History (12/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

32 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

December 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:dissect the early history of slavery in the United States in the contexts of economics, politics, trade, and the Constitution; understand the impact of the Abolitionist movement on the culture of pre-Civil War America; summarize the territorial and demographic issues that impacted the U.S. before the Civil War; compare and contrast the works of influential authors during the Civil War; diagram the succession of the Southern states and the formation of the Confederacy; express how politics, economics, African Americans, and women affected Civil War America; analyze and report on the major battles from 1861-1865; consider the roles of important generals and presidents and their impact on the Civil War; evaluate foreign affairs and military strategies during the Civil War; and measure the lasting impact of the Civil War on Americans during and after the Reconstruction.

Instruction:

Major topics include: slavery in the United States; the Abolitionist Movement in America; the Pre-Civil War Sectional Crisis in the U.S.; influential American Civil War writers; rising tensions in Pre-Civil War America; Southern Secession from the Union; politics, industry, and economy in Civil War America; American Civil War Battles in 1861; American Civil War Battles in 1862; American Civil War Battles in 1863; American Civil War Battles in 1864; American Civil War Battles in 1865; important figures in the American Civil War; military strategies in the American Civil War; life following the American Civil War; and reconstruction after the American Civil War.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History (12/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

19 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:dissect how nationalism affected the nation of Vietnam; compare the important figures and events of the First Indochina War; summarize how President Roosevelt, President Truman, and President Eisenhower formed foreign policy during the First Indochina War; evaluate the consequences of the Geneva Conference; explain the Unites States' involvement in Vietnam, including the policy formation of President Kennedy and the plan for withdrawal made by President Nixon; analyze American dissent during the Vietnam War and how this opposition affected policy; differentiate between the many battles and conflicts of the Vietnam War, as well as the tactics behind their operation; summarize and debate how the Vietnam War impacted Vietnam's neighbors; outline the United States' role in the Cambodian-Vietnamese War; and estimate and infer the effects of the Vietnam War, both inside the United States and in Southeast Asia.

Instruction:

Major topics include:Vietnamese nationalism; the First Indochina War; early American involvement in Indochina; the Geneva Conference and the Vietnam War; U.S. involvement in Vietnam; opposition to the Vietnam War; battles and operations of the Vietnam War; participants and strategies in the Vietnam War; Cambodia and Laos in the Vietnam War; and effects of the Vietnam War.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History (12/16). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze how antisemitism and Nazi racial ideology contributed to the formation of the "Final Solution to the Jewish Question"; identify the victims and perpetrators of the Holocaust; summarize the major components of the Holocaust, including: isolation of Jews from mainstream society, removal of Jews from society to places such as ghettos, the euthanasia programs, death by mass shootings, death in labor camps and the killing centers, reactions to the persecution and murder of the Jews by non-Jews, and resistance by Jews and non-Jews; argue whether the "Final Solution" was planned prior to the beginning of WWII or evolved over the course of the war in response to the changing circumstances of the conflict; and compare the Holocaust to other instances of genocide (including reactions by the international community) after World War II.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: introduction to the Holocaust and World War II, major events and battles in WWII Europe, antisemitism and the rise of Nazi Germany, early persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany, escalation of Nazi persecution of German Jews, mass extermination and ghettos in World War II Europe, World War II and Nazi police groups, Nazi escalation in Europe and the Final Solution, resistance and participation in the Holocaust, the end of WWII and Jewish liberation, and the aftermath of World War II and the Holocaust.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History, European History, Modern German History, Jewish History, 20th Century Europe, or World War II (12/17). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-paced.

Dates:

December 2014 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and explain key concepts, terms, and the general nomenclature in the discipline of political science; assess several forms of political organizations that range in scope from the local to international, and vary in classification from public to private to semi-autonomous; analyze the systems that underlies voting and political participation and the dissemination of political power among offices, bureaucracies, agencies, and institutions within government; evaluate the differences between forms of political organization and government type and what makes each unique in terms of their structure and distribution of power; evaluate the evolution of political theories from antiquity to the contemporary age, and compare as well as contrast the diverse array of approaches to understanding political systems; draw connections between socio-economic forces and public opinions, and how these concepts are measured as well as how they manifest through civic action; appraise the relationship between economics and politics by illustrating how policy may impact markets and how trends in the economy can motivate or dissuade government interventions; analyze a variety of international relations theories and compare them to one another while appraising their utility in encouraging diplomatic and economic bonds between states; and break down global political issues and how they are addressed by a developing international legal and regulatory system, while evaluating the role of globalization, wealth inequality, and environmental concerns in these trends.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: basic terms and concepts of political science, political ideologies and philosophy, forms of government, electoral systems, the branches of government, U.S. Federal bureaucracy, the history and role of political parties, interest groups in politics, mass media and politics, political culture, public opinion and civic behavior, public and social policy, fiscal policy in government and the economy, foreign policy, defense policy and government, concepts of international relations, theories of international relations, international actors in political science, international law in politics, global issues and politics, the congress, powers and elections, presidential elections and powers, the federal judicial system, comparative law, civil liberties, and types of legislatures in government.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Political Science (12/17).

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