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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Psychology and Sociology - Maalot Educational Network

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze historical perspectives toward abnormal behavior; define all the major DSM-IV classifications of abnormal behavior - their causes, manifestations and treatment (neuroses, psychosomatic disorders, personality disorders, addictive disorders, psychoses, organic disorders, eating disorders, suicide, and developmental disorders of childhood); outline the psychoanalytic, biological, cognitive-behavioral, and humanistic theories about mental illness; and explain the major forms of treatment available today. Additionally, students will be able to independently locate sources of information about mental illness and demonstrate an ability to empathize with a person experiencing mental illness.

Instruction:

Major topics include: historical perspective, major psychiatric (DSM-IV) categories, causes and treatment, and four major therapeutic orientations: Psychoanalytical, Biological, Cognitive-Behavioral, and Humanistic.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (2/11) (4/16 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

April 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course students will be able to: describe brain-imaging and behavioral research technologies used by bio-psychologists:  identify basic brain structures and neural systems; describe the structures and electrochemical processes involved in neural communication; explain the role played by neurotransmitters in the etiology and treatment of psychopathology; describe the functional organization of the sensory systems; explain the concept of neuroplasticity; identify main sources of brain injury and rehabilitation approaches; and describe brain systems that mediate emotions, learning , memory and consciousness.

Instruction:

The course focuses on research methodology in biopsychology, on understanding the structure and function of the nervous system, of the sensory and motor systems, on learning and behavior, and on neurological dysfunction and its causes. Topics include: subdivisions of neuropsychology, scientific methods, critical thinking, anatomy of the nervous system, neural conduction, synaptic transmissions, research methods of biopsychology, pharmacological research, genetic engineering, biopsychological patterns of animal behavior, visual system, sensory system, somatosensory systems, chemical senses, sensorimotor system, brain damage and neuroplasticity, sleep, emotion, psychiatric disorders. Assessment: Students are required to complete a number of quizzes covering specific assigned topics and take a midterm and final exam. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology (PSY101).

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (4/16). 

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:understand the physiology of conception, prenatal development and birth; be familiar with Piaget’s theory of cognitive development and Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development; differentiate the various social and emotional stages from birth to adolescence; be familiar with the physical capabilities of humans during the first year of life; the concept of intelligence, nature vs. nurture controversy; the role and importance of attachment in normal development and within abnormal development (including psychopathology).
Instruction:

Major topics include: theory and research on physical, mental, emotional and social development from birth through middle childhood; Piaget’s theory; Erikson’s stages of psychosocial development; and language and intellectual development.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (2/11) (4/16 revalidation). 

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the construction and evaluation of non-experimental, quasi-experimental, and experimental research.

Instruction:

In this course, students acquire a basic understanding of the construction and evaluation of experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental research. Major topics are: the scientific method, research ethics, research design, experimental control, sampling and generalization, hypothesis testing and statistical significance. Students learn how to review journal articles, design a hypothetical study, and write an AOA-style research report.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (2/11) (4/16 revalidation). 

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

April 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to describe the history and the development of the science of psychology; explain the different theoretical viewpoints and research methods used in the psychological systems that comprise the field of psychology.

Instruction:

This course explores the development of the science of psychology. Topics include: pre-scientific psychology such as mental healing, phrenology; the birth of the science of psychology including Wundt, Ebbinghaus; Scientific psychology in America; Early schools of American Psychology, Structuralism, Functionalism; Applied Psychology in America, Psychoanalysis, Freud; Neo-Freudian (Adler, Erikson, Jung and Horney)  Behaviorism; Radical Behaviorism; Social Action and Social Change; Gender differences, Gestalt and cognitive psychology. Students are required to complete a number of quizzes/ essays covering specific assigned topics, a research paper/ final. They will also submit article summaries, a research paper and group projects for their course evaluation.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (4/16).

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: develop an understanding and practice of psychology in the workplace; a comprehensive assessment of the human and societal context within which work takes place and explore the issues, questions and solutions that applied psychology can make; explain the essential language, assumptions and methodology of the psychologist in the workplace; identify the ethical issues involved with advising, consulting and researching within organizational and work settings; construct a framework utilizing a prior understanding of psychology to address issues and concerns of the contemporary workplace; and acquire a necessary background for the study of more specific areas of applied psychology and organizational behavioral studies.

Instruction:

The course covers a variety of topics relating to Industrial/Organizational Psychology including: the history and science of industrial/organizational psychology, the role of the industrial/organizational psychologist in job analysis, training and development in industrial/organizational settings, performance appraisal and feedback, motivation, attitudes, social dynamics, and stress in work settings, and future trends in industrial/organizational psychology.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (2/11) (4/16 revalidation).

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the assigned positive psychology and Jewish texts; demonstrate an understanding of the similarities and differences between the psychological and Jewish views on what constitutes the "good life," including topics such as selfhood, happiness, and well-being; and demonstrate behaviors consistent with positive psychology and Jewish values.

Instruction:

Track 1: Major topics include: Positive Psychology: concepts and application of positive psychology; related skills such as focusing on human strengths and virtues, e.g., gratitude and forgiveness. Track 2: Major topics include: Jewish view of the meaning and purpose of life and the personality and character strengths needed to achieve a happy and fulfilled life.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology or Judaism (2/11) (4/16 revalidation). 

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: outline the significant theories of group dynamics; discuss the principles of group behavior; and differentiate the effects of conditions and factors that result in specific functions and behaviors of groups.

Instruction:

Major topics are: groups, group formation and development; emergent group structures; mediating group processes; interpersonal power within groups; status and role; group tasks and group goals; groups in action; effective participation in groups; and leadership styles.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology and Sociology (2/11) (4/16 revalidation). 

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and structure the counseling situation; identify the elements of effective helping; conduct initial, fact-finding interviews for a mental-status examination; use the Egan model of helping and problem-solving; understand the effective use of self in the counseling process; understand Roger's theory of counseling; and demonstrate specific skills which facilitate good communication and address problematic clients hostile and resistant to counseling.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the nature of helping relationships, goals in counseling skills and techniques, ethics in counseling, and the components of effective helping in a theoretical as well as a practical framework.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (2/11) (4/16 revalidation).

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss biological, physiological, behavioral and cognitive influences in psychology; major personality theories; mental health/illness; and the social influences upon people.

Instruction:

Major topics include: biological bases of behavior, perception, learning and memory; problem solving, mental health; psychological development, and social psychology.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (2/11) (4/16 revalidation). 

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