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National College Credit Recommendation Service

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Philosophy - Maalot Educational Network

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: develop a rigorous methodology for analyzing and locating issues and views within the matrix of Jewish philosophy and historiography, and articulate the response of historical Judaism to the challenge of modernity.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are: the Oral Law and Rabbinical authority; analysis of critique of nontraditional trends in Judaism; immanental and eschatological aspects of Divinity and the relation of Torah to the physical world: contrasting views up until contemporary times; Jewish thought and commentary on modern anti-Semitism and the Holocaust; the issue of Da'as Torah in its historical and modern expressions; parameters of traditional Jewish faith in the contemporary world. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy, Ethics, Hebraic/Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation).

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:

39 hours (13 weeks); Proficiency exam or self-study format.   

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to analyze the ethical, moral and theological teachings represented in the Avot tract and the various interpretations reflected in the accompanying commentaries.

Instruction:

Instruction is offered via traditional classroom-based format or as a proficiency exam. Major topics covered in the course are: charity, altruism and selfishness, humility, asceticism, spirituality, judicial ethics, theodicy, and eschatology. Methods of instruction include lecture and discussion.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category 3 semester hours in Philosophy, Hebraic/Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation).

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to articulate an understanding of the deeper meaning of the Mitzvot as a system of human development, according to traditional sources in Jewish thought and philosophy.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are: the laws and customs of Shabbat, the blessings, selected prayers, and women's mitzvot. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and Textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation).

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand deeper meanings of the Mitzvot as a system of human development, according to traditional sources in Jewish thought and philosophy and demonstrate how the Mitzvot relates to contemporary philosophical and psychological issues.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are: the philosophy of mitzvot, faith and reason, free will, the purpose of Torah study, Torah study for women in the modern world, self knowledge and character development, loving G-d and loving other human beings, honoring parents. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy, Ethics, Hebraic/Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation).

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the classic Jewish texts addressing issues in interpersonal relationships and of the teachings enunciated in those texts.

Instruction:

This course may be delivered in a classroom or online format. Topics covered in the course are: examining issues of hatred, reproof, revenge, cynical and deceptive abuse, friendship, greed, and charity. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and Textual preparation. Prerequisites: Three courses in Philosophy or Religion. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy, Ethics, Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation).

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historical background of Rambam's formulation of the principles and the influence of the principles on contemporary discussions, as well as the theological and ethical ideas expressed in the principles.

Instruction:

Major topics include: Rambam's methodology in formulating the thirteen principles, the principles themselves, and related theological and philosophical issues. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and Textual preparation. Prerequisite: Three courses in Philosophy or Religion. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy, Theology, or Religion (10/10) (8/15 revalidation).

Location:

Maalot, Jerusalem, and other approved locations.

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to discuss religious, philosophical, and ethical issues based on an analysis of a wide range of pertinent source materials.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the closeness of Israel, equal opportunity, racial and religious tolerance, relationships with non-Jews, anti-Semitism, the seven Noahide laws, suffering, and Theodicy. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include: lecture, classroom discussion, and textual preparation. Prerequisite: To be posted.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religion, Ethics, or Hebraic/Judaic Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation). 

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate understanding of the philosophical and theological centrality of prayer; demonstrate understanding of central themes by analyzing specific parts of prayers; and demonstrate understanding of pertinent laws and their conceptual underpinnings.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are: careful examinations of the texts of prayers; the purpose of prayer; intention and devotion during prayer; the Morning Prayer: its components, themes and laws. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religious Studies or Theology (10/10) (8/15 revalidation).

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the case for the existence of G-d and attendant aspects of the Jewish faith doctrine argued in rationalist terms, the substantive argumentation of opposing positions, and the problematic ramifications of a faith commitment untempered by the rationalistic dimension.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are: arguments for the belief in G-d and arguments for Divine origin of Torah. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy, Religion, or Hebraic/Judaic Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation). 

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a firm grasp of major issues in contemporary scientific theory and methodology as well as an ability to address those issues from the perspective of traditional Jewish thought.

Instruction:

Topics covered in this course are: how recent developments in science cohere with basic tenets of Judaism; presuppositions of scientific methodology; the limits of science; conflict resolution within science and between science and Judaism; scientific presuppositions of Judaism. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Philosophy, Religion, Judaic/Hebraic Studies, or General Science (10/10) (8/15 revalidation).

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