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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Philosophy - Maalot Educational Network

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2020 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to evaluate and explain the fundamental substance of the Beis HaLevi’s formulation of essential concepts of Jewish philosophy, distinguish the Beis HaLevi’s distinctive methodology in exegesis of biblical and rabbinic sources, and recognize and analyze the theological and ethical ideas expressed in prior works of Jewish philosophy as they are addressed and developed in the Beis HaLevi’s writings. Students will be able to interpret classic and modern Jewish philosophical work with greater skill and knowledge of philosophical terms.

Instruction:

Major topics taught in this course include: Connection between the golden calf and the giving of the Torah, Moshe’s response to the golden calf, the power of Repentance, merits, demerits and consequences in the balance of human behavior, “E-he-ye-h asher E-he-ye-h” as a principle in accountability, Yitzchak, Rivka and Esav - the concept of the firstborn, the value of charity as a conduit  to goodness and abundance, the dialogues of Rabbi Akiva and Tyranus Rufus, purposes of the ten plagues, connection between the ten plagues and the sin of the golden calf, understanding the sin of the golden calf, understanding the concept of mitzvos, red heifer in the repentance process, why remember Amalek, and the answer to the wicked son in the Haggadah. Topics and exegetists may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion and textual preparations. Prerequisite: Ability to read and comprehend Hebrew language, familiarity with courses in Biblical texts and exegesis, two courses in Jewish Philosophy, or permission from the instructor.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Hebrew Bible, or Religious Studies (3/21).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks); Proficiency exam or self-study format.   

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to analyze the ethical, moral and theological teachings represented in the Avot tract and the various interpretations reflected in the accompanying commentaries.

Instruction:

Instruction is offered via traditional classroom-based format or as a proficiency exam. Major topics covered in the course are: charity, altruism and selfishness, humility, asceticism, spirituality, judicial ethics, theodicy, and eschatology. Methods of instruction include lecture and discussion.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category 3 semester hours in Philosophy, Hebraic/Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2020 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will analyze the historical and personal contexts of primary sources, discern the relationship of a teacher to his or her students through their letters, and evaluate Jewish philosophical approaches to selected concepts. Students will demonstrate proficiency in textual skills and modern Jewish history through researching original texts and the personal lives of their authors.  

Instruction:

Bibliographical information about each letter writer and his/her influence on Jewish history, the importance of knowing an author’s historical context, major accomplishments, and the name by which he/she is known, the superiority of letters to published material in getting to know the author’s mind, value of prayer,  dual nature of trials, G-d responds in kind, women’s role, spiritual aspirations and social life, fraternal love as the gateway to love of G-d, impact of Bais Yaakov on women of its generation and on ours, Purim as “letter” and personal message,  G-dliness and Amalek,  obligation to feel personal experience of the Exodus from Egypt, what Pesach celebrates, solitude and society, maintaining values even in hardship,  modern idolatries, and growth-potential of milestones.  Topics and sources may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion and textual preparations. Prerequisite: Ability to read and comprehend Hebrew language familiarity with courses in Biblical texts and exegesis. Pre or co-requisite: two courses in Jewish Philosophy, or permission from the instructor.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Hebrew Bible, or Religious Studies (3/21).

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to articulate an understanding of the deeper meaning of the Mitzvot as a system of human development, according to traditional sources in Jewish thought and philosophy.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are: the laws and customs of Shabbat, the blessings, selected prayers, and women's mitzvot. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and Textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand deeper meanings of the Mitzvot as a system of human development, according to traditional sources in Jewish thought and philosophy and demonstrate how the Mitzvot relates to contemporary philosophical and psychological issues.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are: the philosophy of mitzvot, faith and reason, free will, the purpose of Torah study, Torah study for women in the modern world, self knowledge and character development, loving G-d and loving other human beings, honoring parents. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy, Ethics, Hebraic/Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the classic Jewish texts addressing issues in interpersonal relationships and of the teachings enunciated in those texts.

Instruction:

This course may be delivered in a classroom or online format. Topics covered in the course are: examining issues of hatred, reproof, revenge, cynical and deceptive abuse, friendship, greed, and charity. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and Textual preparation. Prerequisites: Three courses in Philosophy or Religion. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy, Ethics, Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historical background of Rambam's formulation of the principles and the influence of the principles on contemporary discussions, as well as the theological and ethical ideas expressed in the principles.

Instruction:

Major topics include: Rambam's methodology in formulating the thirteen principles, the principles themselves, and related theological and philosophical issues. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and Textual preparation. Prerequisite: Three courses in Philosophy or Religion. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy, Theology, or Religion (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to discuss religious, philosophical, and ethical issues based on an analysis of a wide range of pertinent source materials.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the closeness of Israel, equal opportunity, racial and religious tolerance, relationships with non-Jews, anti-Semitism, the seven Noahide laws, suffering, and Theodicy. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include: lecture, classroom discussion, and textual preparation. Prerequisite: To be posted.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religion, Ethics, or Hebraic/Judaic Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation). 

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate understanding of the philosophical and theological centrality of prayer; demonstrate understanding of central themes by analyzing specific parts of prayers; and demonstrate understanding of pertinent laws and their conceptual underpinnings.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are: careful examinations of the texts of prayers; the purpose of prayer; intention and devotion during prayer; the Morning Prayer: its components, themes and laws. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religious Studies or Theology (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:
39 hours (13 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the case for the existence of G-d and attendant aspects of the Jewish faith doctrine argued in rationalist terms, the substantive argumentation of opposing positions, and the problematic ramifications of a faith commitment untempered by the rationalistic dimension.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are: arguments for the belief in G-d and arguments for Divine origin of Torah. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy, Religion, or Hebraic/Judaic Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation). 

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