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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Computer Science - Maalot Educational Network

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:
September 2009 - Present
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the details of various types of advanced data structures, know how and when to use them, and evaluate their efficiency: implement bubble, selection, insertion, shell, quick, merge and heapsort; implement linear, binary and interpolation search; optimize sorts where possible; compare and contrast different searching and sorting algorithms; implement algorithms to find min and max of binary trees and predecessors and successors of given nodes; identify and define balanced binary trees, self-balancing binary search trees (red-black and AVL), multiway search trees, B trees, B+ trees; understand insertion and traversal algorithms for various self-balancing binary search trees and multiway search trees; differentiate between and understand practical applications of different trees; identify and list practical applications of heaps, hash tables and graphs; perform simple operations on heaps and graphs; represent heaps and graphs in multiple ways; address hash table collisions in multiple ways ; and analyze time complexities of all algorithms.

Instruction:

Topics covered are: evaluation of algorithms, Sorting algorithms – bubble, selection, insertion, merge, quick, shell, and tree sorts, heaps and heapsort, Searching techniques -  linear, binary, interpolation, Trees – B-trees, B+trees, Red-Black trees, Hashing, Graphs., b-trees, b+ trees, red-black trees, hashing, and graphs. Methods of instruction include lecture and lab.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science (2/11) (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation). 

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: build advanced web pages using   Html, CSS, Javascript and Php and implement basic CRUD functionality.

Instruction:

Topics covered are: HTML, style sheets, the Document Object Model - accessing objects and properties, manipulating them, trigger events, scripting, browser compatibility issues, Php and MySql.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science (2/11) (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

Version 1: 39 hours (13 weeks). Version 2: 52 hours (17 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2009 - March 2015. Version 2: April 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand the basic components of a computer system; be familiar with terms being used in computer world today; be knowledgeable in the Windows Operating System; and demonstrate proficiency in the most common Microsoft Office applications. Version 2: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify specifications and configurations of computer hardware, demonstrate the understanding and use of the components of a computer system, use terminology of current computer language correctly, use the Windows operating system easily and effectively, be proficient in the most common Microsoft 2019 applications, Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint, produce professional looking documents and presentations, create spreadsheets and charts using Microsoft Excel, utilize and customize a database using Microsoft Access and utilize the Internet and its capabilities to create personal webpages using HTML. 

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course may be delivered in a classroom or online format. The course is intended as an introduction to computers and the basic application software categories of word processing, database and spreadsheets using Microsoft Office software applications.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as an elective in Computer Science (2/11). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours as an elective in Computer Science (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2009 - August 2014. Version 2: September 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: write programs in C++ using basic and advanced features of the features of the language. Specifically: demonstrate the ability to perform  arithmetic and character operations on variables; demonstrate the ability to write a program that creates classes and objects; demonstrate the ability to use control structures in writing a program; demonstrate the ability to use a simple repetition statement in writing a program; be able to use different data types and perform conversions between the different types; demonstrate the ability to use nested loops in writing a program; demonstrate the ability to use a counter controlled loop in writing a program; be able to differentiate between the different logical operators and show their use in compound selector statements; demonstrate the ability to declare and use one-dimensional arrays; demonstrate the ability to declare and use two-dimensional arrays; demonstrate the ability to declare and use methods in a program; demonstrate the ability to declare and use classes and objects in a program; demonstrate the ability to declare and manipulate strings.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Topics covered are: Introduction to programming using the C# language, use of variables, data types and conversions, arithmetic operators, control structures, repetition, methods, arrays, strings, classes and objects, and I/O.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science (2/11) (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation). 

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2009 - August 2014. Version 2: September 2014 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: handle programming problems with an object-oriented approach and use object-oriented techniques to solve programming problems. This course teaches these concepts using C++.  Specifically: demonstrate the ability to use object properly in a program; demonstrate the ability to differentiate between composition and Inheritance according to the principles of OOP; acquire the programming skills needed to write a program using a class  inheritance hierarchy; demonstrate the ability to write programs that use polymorphism, and be able to identify polymorphism in code examples; demonstrate the ability to apply the OOP principle of abstraction within a C++ program; demonstrate the ability to apply the OOP principle of behavioral abstraction within a C++ program; demonstrate the ability to write programs using GUI components, and define event handlers for the components; demonstrate the ability to use delegates as necessary in an event handling context; demonstrate the ability to write programs using advanced GUI components; demonstrate the ability to write programs that create and access files; demonstrate the ability to write programs using generic methods and classes; and demonstrate the ability to write a program using asynchronous programming techniques.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Topics covered are: Introduction of the concepts in object oriented programming, objects, inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation, use of GUI components in C#, including event handling and delegates.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science (2/11) (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: use mathematical expressions to describe functions of simple combinational and sequential circuits; describe the physical limitations of electronic circuits; explain the pros and cons of using different formats to represent numerical data; convert numerical data from one format to another; discuss effects of fixed-length number representations on accuracy and precision; describe internal representation of characters, strings, records, and arrays; explain the basic organization and major functional units of the von Neumann machine; comprehend how an instruction is executed in a von Neumann machine; summarize how instructions are represented at machine levels and in context of a symbolic assembler; identify different instruction formats, such as addresses per instruction and variable length versus fixed length formats; write simple assembly language program segments; demonstrate how fundamental high-level programming constructs are implemented at the machine-language level; comprehend basic concepts of interrupts and I/O operations; explain how interrupts are used to implement I/O control and data transfers; identify various types of buses; describe data access from various drives, such as magnetic disks, optical disks, magnetic tape, and RAID drives; compare alternative implementations of datapaths; discuss control points and the generation of control signals using hardwired or microprogrammed implementations; explain basic instruction level parallelism using pipelining and describe hazards that may occur; implement parallel processing beyond the classical von Neumann model; describe alternative architectures such as SISD (Single Instruction, Single Data), SIMD (Single Instruction, Multiple Data), MISD (Multiple Instruction, Single Data), and MIMD (Multiple Instruction, Multiple Data), and VLIW (Very Long Instruction Word.)

Instruction:

Topics covered are: Introduction to various hardware and software components necessary to process information digitally, as defined by the structure and architecture of computers and their organizations, components and layers of the computing systems - electronic gates and progressing to higher level software, the main roles and components of the ALU, CPU, main memory, I/O.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as an elective in Computer Science (2/11) (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain what data structures are and why they are important; implement and operate upon arrays, ordered arrays, linked lists of various types, stacks, queues, deques, binary trees and binary search trees; analyze time complexity of data structures and their operations (insertion, deletion, searching, etc.); identify which data structures and algorithms are more suited to particular tasks and scenarios; identify and appreciate efficiency in programming; explain and utilize pointers; identify practical applications of data structures; understand the beauty of recursion; trace through recursive algorithms with a clear understanding of how they work and what’s being done at each step in the code; utilize recursion in one’s own programming; differentiate between different types of trees; identify different parts of a tree as well as a tree’s size, height and the depth of a given node; implement binary trees with multiple underlying data structures.

Instruction:

Topics covered are: Pointers, algorithm and data structure complexity analysis (big o), linked lists, recursion, stacks, queues and deques, circular and doubly linked lists, binary trees, general trees.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science (2/11) (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and apply database concepts such as: database design, relational database design, database architecture, entity-relationships, data normalization, data modeling, ensuring data independence, query design, relationships, SQL, client/server, transaction processing, data types, indexing, ODBC, data access languages, security. The student will be able to design, build and implement a fully functional relational database using either Microsoft Access and/or SQL Server implementing the concepts covered.

Instruction:

Topics covered are: database concepts and definitions, logical organization, components of databases, database architecture and data modeling, data normalization, data descriptions and query languages, SQL, query processing, transaction processing, database integrity, database design, client/server environment, Microsoft Access, data access using ADO and DAO.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science (2/11) (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to analyze a problem, write an algorithm for it and code the solution in Visual Basic; debug and thoroughly test the program; and demonstrate proficiency in concepts of information technology and computer systems including hardware and software fundamentals, productivity software, digital media, database applications, networking, the Internet, and security and privacy issues. Specifically: be able to write a program in Visual Basic using Visual Studio; be able to use and code basic Windows controls in Visual Basic; be able to compare expressions in Visual Basic; be able to use the selector control in writing a program in Visual Basic; use a simple loop in writing a program; use a counter controlled loop in writing a program; be able to write nested loops in Visual Basic; demonstrate the ability to write an algorithm, analyze a problem, and implement the solution using principles of good programming; demonstrate the use of a collection of data using arrays; demonstrate comprehension of hardware fundamentals; show understanding of how the Internet works; demonstrate knowledge of the components of a computer; identify the general categories of programs, and describe how the operating system interacts with applications; be able to define and describe the various security risks and privacy issues that are involved in using computers; describe how programs run applications instructions and differentiate between the various types of memory; be able to describe an operating system and describe features of the more prevalent ones; and be able to discuss the purpose of components required for successful communications.

Instruction:

Topic include: Beginning concepts of programming using Visual Basic 2012, and basic concepts of information technology and computer systems.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science (2/11) (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the basic structure of an operating system and its components; describe and implement fundamental operating systems abstractions such as processes, threads, files, and semaphores; define the principles of concurrency and synchronization and interprocess communication; implement basic resource management techniques (scheduling, memory management) and principles. These also include issues of performance and fairness objectives, and avoiding deadlocks. Perform practical exercises using different basic linux networking commands.

Instruction:

Major topics are: general introduction to operating systems; the services provided to users, and how users can request services through system calls; algorithms for and approaches to CPU scheduling; disk scheduling; file management; memory management; input/output handling; concurrent programming; and problems such as critical sections, process coordination, and deadlock and solutions to these problems.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science (2/11) (4/16 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

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