Skip to main content

National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Judaic Studies/Religion - Maalot Educational Network

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Judaic Studies/Religion - Maalot Educational Network

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Formerly:
Advanced Topics in Bible (REL399)
Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: articulate insight into the various theological, philosophical & legal implications of a variety of exegetical and midrashic insights and demonstrate advanced skills in independent Biblical research.

Instruction:

Major topics taught in this course include: Noach; Lamech; ark; seven Noahide commandments; Abraham; circumcision; covenant; sacrifices; Land of Israel; rain; forefathers as G-d’s chariot; personality types; binding of Isaac; Rebecca’s character; women’s commandments; Isaac; interaction between Divine attributes of justice and mercy; forefather’s individual response to Divine accusations; Jacob’s dream; promise of Divine protection; Jacob’s family; Jacob’s names; G-d’s promises; Reuven’s behavior; blessings, priestly blessings, and blessings of Jacob and Moshe; G-d’s names; Moshe as leader; commandments; revelation; tablets of the law; sin of the Golden Calf; tabernacle; redemption; counting; seven; impurity;  festivals; Sabbatical year and Jubilee year; freedom; sin of spies; Korach; incense; tabernacle; false prophets; forbidden foods; Sotah; Nazarite; repentance. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Bible, Judaic Studies, Literature, Religious Studies, or Survey of Biblical Literature (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: articulate insight into the various theological, philosophical & legal implications of a variety of exegetical and midrashic insights and demonstrate advanced skills in independent Biblical research.

Instruction:

Major topics taught in this course include: Hebron: who it was given to, its previous name, mourning for Moshe, Caleb’s name, Osniel’s name, Prayer, the cycle of the Book of Judges, mourning for Yehoshua, Aramaic, a nation’s sar, Hebron, mourning for Moshe, Caleb, Osniel, G-d answers the prayers of the broken-hearted, Amon and Moav, Devorah: song, palm tree, Sisera: his end, his mother, Gideon, the sun as a symbol of the temporal world, merits of the Forefathers, Dew: significance, difference between rain and dew, miracles,  Ephod, Shechem, the necessity of self-knowledge in character growth, Jephtha, Human sacrifice, Samson: nazir, strength, parents, fox, jawbone, Delilah, sin, error, Philistines, Micha’s idol, concubine of Giveah. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Hebrew Scriptures, Judaic Studies, Literature, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39  hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: connect, explain and compare the relationship between selected Biblical topics and the exegeses of Talmudic, Midrashic, and later writings that expound upon them; apply research and language skills in independent Biblical research.

Instruction:

Major topics taught in this course include: Chronology of exegetes, approaches of various Midrashic and Talmudic exegeses, revelations about the end of days, Nitzutzot, Exile, Shema Yisrael, Baruch Shem Kevod Malchut, Reuven and his father’s bed, Reuven’s offer to look after Binyamin, Reuven is compared to water, Reuven’s status, Tribe of Reuven’s place in Eretz Yisrael, Yakov on his deathbed, Moshe’s blessings, Midrashic insights, Who sold Yosef, Shechem, Yakov’s prayers, the power of anger, G-d spoke through Yakov’s mouth, Pesach sacrifice in Mitzrayim and in Midbar, Dan’s blessing, Shimshon. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation. Prerequisite or co-requisite should include at least two course in Bible and Prophets.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Bible, Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: articulate the foundations of Chabad Chassidic philosophy and support the discussion with appropriate textual sources; recognize, define and apply the terminology of Chabad philosophy; compare and contrast Chabad Chassidic writings with other Jewish philosophical works.

Instruction:

Major topics taught in this course include: the structure of Tanya, the basic terminology of Tanya, the Divine Soul, the self and the ways and means of achieving a closer understanding of G-d, self and fellow man, the philosophy of Chabad as a practical manual for understanding of self-relationship to fellow man, outlook on the world and relationship to Hashem, Unity of G-d, the interplay of emotion and intellect, “Nothingness,” “creation from nothingness, Gimatrias.  Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation. Prerequisite: Background knowledge in Jewish Religion and Philosophy.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, or Philosophy (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:
September 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and discuss the foundations of Chabad Chassidus philosophy and the terminology of Chabad philosophy and compare and contrast the Chabad Chassidus philosophy to other Jewish philosophical works.

Instruction:

Major topics taught in this course include: essential topics in Chabad Chassidus, such as: the Divine soul; the self, ways and means of achieving a closer understanding of G-d, self and fellow man; and penitence. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, or Philosophy (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2020 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: recognize and apply the terminology of Mussar concepts; successfully apply these concepts to character development, recognizing points of decision, making life choices, avoiding pitfalls in character development and recovering from failure.

Instruction:

Topics include Major classical concepts in the study of Mussar, character refinement, responsibility to improve one’s self in an organized manner, growth in stages, the primary role of Torah in the process; the nobility of man; bringing out one’s potential; connection with the Creator, growing through failure. Prerequisite: Ability to read and comprehend Hebrew language familiarity with courses in Biblical texts and exegesis.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Ethics, Religious Ethics, Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (3/21). 

Length:

Classroom-based instruction: 39 hours (13 weeks). Proficiency exam: Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify, describe and interpret Biblical and Rabbinic sources pertaining to laws of interpersonal communication; discuss the background and philosophy behind the laws; apply the sources, laws and philosophical underpinnings to practical application - when, where, how one may share information about others.

Instruction:

Major topics taught in this course include: Biblical and Rabbinic sources on verbal abuse and laws of slander, gossip, and the private and public exchange of information in Jewish Law. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion and textual preparation. Prerequisite: Basic Halalchic knowledge.  

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Ethics, Religious Ethics, Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2020 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to analyze the depth of the major religious, ethical, halachic and historical elements of selected topics in the Book of Genesis.  Students will demonstrate improving skill levels in parsing biblical texts and their exegeses.

Instruction:

Major topics include: History of learning Pshat, sin of the Tree of Knowledge and the fall of man, tower of Babel and the Generation of the Dispersion, the story of Judah and Tamar, the mysterious lineage of Messiah – various incidents in the lineage of the Kingdom of David and philosophical implications, Dinah and Shechem.  All topics are drawn from, and  based on Biblical and Chassidic sources. Topics and sources may vary. Prerequisite: Ability to read and comprehend Hebrew language with some fluency as well previous coursework in Biblical texts and exegesis or permission of instructor. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Bible, Judaic Studies, or Religious Studies (3/21).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2020 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to discuss the details of the lives of the Patriarchs and Matriarchs as well as the ethical, moral and theological motifs of their narratives; conduct independent research into Biblical texts and analyze their findings; apply this information to create a family tree and an extensive research paper that highlights the connection of each Jew to his own ethical and historic roots using the Patriarchs and Matriarchs as a paradigm.

Instruction:

Major topics include: G-d’s chariot, need for caution in studying the lives of the Patriarchs and Matriarchs, instilling character traits in one’s descendants, Avraham against the world, Avraham spreads word of G-d’s existence, G-d’s love for Avraham, differences between Noah and Avraham, Sarah’s response, Yitzchak’s gevurah and tefilla, Rivkah’s binah yeseirah, Yakov and truth, Leah’s inner desire, Rachel’s mercy, beauty and commentary on being buried alone,  Ultimate purpose of the world’s existence. Topics and sources may vary. Prerequisite: Ability to read and comprehend Hebrew language familiarity with courses in Biblical texts and exegesis.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Biblical Studies, History, Religious Studies (3/21).

Length:

39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

September 2009 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: articulate Rabbinic views on selected contemporary halachic issues of particular relevance to Jewish women; decode primary sources; discern the basis of halachic decisions; integrate and apply real-life applications of halachic sources; use their knowledge to study new halachic topics taught in the course; understand new issues that arise in the future that relate to course topics and demonstrate the ability to apply halachic decisions to new situations.

Instruction:

Major topics taught in this course include: Metzuveh v’oseh and eino metzuveh v’oseh; d’lo mafkidna v’avidna; hedyot; making a blessing on non-obligatory mitzvahs; time-bound positive mitzvahs; lo Tikrevu L’galot Ervah; niddah; ervah; dat Yehudit; kalta; “There is no custodian against immorality”; preventive measures. Topics may vary. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and textual preparation Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of fundamental Jewish concepts in Law and Philosophy.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies or Religious Studies (10/10) (8/15 revalidation) (3/21 revalidation). 

Top