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National College Credit Recommendation Service

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Science - Maalot Educational Network

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 39 hours (13 weeks). Lab component includes an additional 20 hours.

Dates:

Version 1: September 2010 - March 2016.  Version 2:  April 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify cell types, tissue types, and gross anatomy of the body with regard to the following systems: Integumentary, Skeletal, Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Digestive, and Endocrine and explain the normal functioning of the body in each system, as well as identify disruptions in homeostasis resulting in disease states.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Methods of instruction include lecture and demonstrations with a laboratory requirement. A general overview of the organization of the human body is presented, along with major organ systems and an overview of pathophysiology topics.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Science (2/11). NOTE: With the lab component, in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Science (2/11). Version 2: In the upper division baccalareate degree category, 3 semester hours in Science (4/16 revalidation). NOTE: With the lab component, in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Science.

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 39 hours (13 weeks). Lab component includes an additional 20 hours.

Dates:

Version 1: September 2009 - March 2016. Version 2: April 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify cell types, tissue types, and gross anatomy of the body with regard to the following systems: Nervous, Muscular, Lymphatic, Urinary, and Reproductive; explain the normal functioning of the body in each system; and identify relevant pathophysiologic conditions as imbalances in homeostasis.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Methods of instruction include lecture and lab. A general overview of the organization of the human body is presented, along with major organ systems and an overview of pathophysiology topics. Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO2111). 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Science (2/11). NOTE: With the lab component, in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Science (2/11). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Science (4/16 revalidation). NOTE: With the lab component, in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Science. 

Location:

Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 39 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2010 - March 2016. Version 2: April 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply the scientific method to support problem-solving techniques; collect and organize data in a systematic manner using graphs and tables; apply basic chemical and molecular principles to the functioning cell; identify the structures and explain the functions of living cells as the basic unit of life; describe the principles of cellular metabolism and energy utilization; describe the structure and growth of bacteria and viruses and their impact on humans; compare and contrast asexual and sexual reproduction; describe the structure and process of replication of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA); describe gene structure and protein synthesis and its relationship to gene expression; explain the principles of Mendelian genetics and patterns of inheritance; discuss advances in biotechnology and genomics and evolution of the genome; discuss Darwin's research and fundamental evolutionary concepts; discuss how populations evolve and describe the concept of biodiversity; describe the organization and specialization of human cells into tissues and organs; describe human histology including basic tissue types, their structure and function; and identify human organs systems and describe their functions. 

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include:  Fundamental principles of life processes of organisms, Scientific research, Scientific Method, basic concepts in Biochemistry, cell structures and function, metabolism, genetics, molecular genetics, evolution, and animal form and function. The laboratory component of the course reinforces the biological principles through experiments. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or Science (2/11). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or Science (4/16 revalidation).

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 65 hours (13 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2010 - March 2016. Version 2: April 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply the scientific method to support problem-solving techniques; collect and organize data in a systematic manner using graphs and tables; apply basic chemical and molecular principles to the functioning cell; identify the structures and explain the functions of living cells as the basic unit of life; describe the principles of cellular metabolism and energy utilization; describe the structure and growth of bacteria and viruses and their impact on humans;compare and contrast asexual and sexual reproduction; describe the structure and process of replication of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA); describe gene structure and protein synthesis and its relationship to gene expression; explain the principles of Mendelian genetics and patterns of inheritance; discuss advances in biotechnology and genomics and evolution of the genome; discuss Darwin's research and fundamental evolutionary concepts; discuss how populations evolve and describe the concept of biodiversity; describe the organization and specialization of human cells into tissues and organs; describe human histology including basic tissue types, their structure and function; identify human organs systems and describe their functions. Lab sessions parallel the lectures in Biology (BIO111) in order to illustrate selected principles learned in a hands-on fashion.     

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Topics include: the scientific method, chemical basis of life, cell structure and metabolism, cellular reproduction, genetics and transfer of genetic information from genes to protein, and the molecular basis of cancer. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biology or Science (2/11). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biology or Science (4/16 revalidation). 

Location:

Maalot, Jerusalem and other authorized locations

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2009 - March 2016. Version 2: April 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the courses, students will be able to: explain fundamental concepts in chemistry that will form the foundation for future specialized study in the fields of biomedicine and health professions. Students will be able to identify, analyze and interpret: The Periodic Table and its Families; Atoms and Atomic Structure; Molecules and Ions; Chemical Reactions; Moles, Molar Mass and Stoichiometry; Gas Laws; Thermochemistry; Introduction to Chemical Equilibria; Acid-Base Concepts in Aqueous Solutions; Oxidation-Reduction Processes and Electrochemical Cells; Quantum Theory; The Chemical Bond; Molecular Geometry; and Intermolecular Forces.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Topics include: atoms, molecules, atomic theory, chemical formulas and equations, matter and energy, properties of solution, periodicity of elements, chemical bonding, and properties of gasses. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Science or Biology (2/11). Version 2:  In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Science or Biology (4/16 revalidation).

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 45 hours (5 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2009 - March 2016. Version 2: April 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and explain the fundamental concepts in chemistry that form the foundation for future specialized study in the fields of biomedicine and health professions; apply important concepts and theories of general and inorganic chemistry to other disciplines in the applied sciences; plan and perform experiments; gather and analyze data; and draw conclusions.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Topics include: atoms, molecules, atomic theory, chemical formulas and equations, matter and energy, properties of solution, periodicity of elements, chemical bonding, and properties of gasses. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Chemistry or Science (2/11). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Chemistry or Science (4/16 revalidation).

Location:
Maalot, Jerusalem, and other authorized locations.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 39 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1:  September 2009 - Mach 2016. Version 2: April 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a basic knowledge of the six key nutrients and describe their food sources and functions in the body; discuss the digestion process; devise a dietary pattern which meets human needs at various life cycle states; identify the basic principles of nutrition and factors influencing diet, and discuss the relation of food consumption to physical and mental health; recognize socio-economic, cultural and psychological factors; explain the relationship between energy balance and weight management; analyze factors involved in modified diets; analyze food intake according to RDA's, the pyramid and exchange lists; implement a personal dietary assessment; interpret food label information and apply nutrition principles to make modifications; adapt recipes; relate nutrition to health concerns; discuss research studies and controversial issues in nutrition; identify tenets of successful goal setting and behavior change; determine a fad diet from healthy eating; explain the basis of eating disorders and body image disturbances, their prevention and causes; and experience varied exercise mediums and explain the components of fitness.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course may be delivered in a classroom or online format. Topics include: digestion, absorption of nutrients, carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins and mineral requirements, additives, fads, diet, exercise and body response, socioeconomic influences on nutritional habits, and culture and consumer concerns. Methods of instruction include lecture and lab exercises. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Science or Nutrition (2/11). Version 2:  In the associate degree/certificate category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Science or Nutrition (4/16 revalidation). 

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