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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Education - Consortium for International Studies

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study.

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the challenge of educating young children with special needs; summarize partnership with families; develop individualized intervention plans and programs and monitor progress; design instructional programs; explain considerations for teaching children with specific disabilities; understand emotional and social development; summarize how  educators can nurture communication skills; describe the development of cognitive skills and literacy; and outline various teaming, collaboration, problem-solving, and consultation.

Instruction:

This self-study course consists of 15 weekly lessons. Topics include: various models, history, current issues and strategies in providing collaborative supports, accommodations, and differentiated curriculum to include students with disabilities and other special needs in general education classes. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education (8/18).

Formerly:
Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood EDU 306
Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe key concepts associated with adolescence and emerging adulthood; identify the importance of outside influences, such as friends and social media in adolescent; discuss the importance of family relationships; describe school and achievement measurement; identify adolescent work opportunities; explore content literacy assessments and teaching approaches for struggling readers; discuss how to use active reading in the classroom: and how to promote reading comprehension.

Instruction:

Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood is a self-study course of 15 weekly lessons. In this course, students explore the field of adolescent development. Students learn key theories, research and application. Topics include: biological foundations, cognitive foundations, cultural beliefs, the self, family relationships, friends and peers, school, work, and adolescence and emerging adulthood in the 21st century.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education or Psychology (6/19).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the purpose, history and trends of assessment in early childhood; describe how standardized tests are used, designed, and selected for infants and young children; describe the purposes of classroom assessments and their role in developing effective classroom instruction; and discuss the importance of developing alternative reporting systems.

Instruction:

This course examines the use of assessment practices and strategies to improve student learning in early childhood. Special emphasis is placed on standardized tests and, more importantly, other types of assessments that are appropriate for young children, such as screening tools, observations, checklists, and rating scales. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Education (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study.

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the development of play throughout the human life span from a variety of theoretical perspectives; identify types of play based on a variety of forms such as ritual, story-making, games and fairy tales; explore the role of play in human experience; discuss the relationship of play to other aspects of development, such as language, logical-mathematical thinking, social and moral development, spiritual development and creativity; critically reflect upon research and theory on play from the perspective of cultural bias; evaluate personal biases and evidence of collective bias and stereotyping in children’s toys, games, and television programming and commercials and demonstrate how these biases and stereotypes influence children’s play, plan and facilitate play-based learning activities; and construct an understanding of the role of play in counseling and therapy. 

Instruction:

This self-study course consists of 15 weekly lessons. The course provides a broad study of the philosophical and social foundations of early childhood education in the United States. Topics include: review of recent research on play and development in the early childhood classroom; various instructional strategies and techniques designed to support a play-centered curriculum in the core curriculum areas; use of play as a form of assessment; and toys and technology that support a play-based curriculum. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Education (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: list and describe the three social settings named in this course; explain the term ‘parent’ and recognize different parenting styles; recognize the benefits and processes associated with placing children with disabilities in regular education classrooms; distinguish between signs of neglect, abuses and how to deal with them; outline and describe the various influences attributed to the three social settings, namely home, community, and school on the overall development of the child; and appraise and compare the different communication strategies for establishing and maintaining collaborative relationship and partnership among schools, communities, and families

Instruction:

Family, school, and community collaboration is the key to addressing the alarming rate of school dropout while also fostering higher educational aspirations. This fact holds true for students at both the elementary and secondary level and is regardless of the parents’ education, family income or background. In this course, students explore the effects of social settings on children’s lives, including home, school, and the community.  Students examine the different roles of parents and how cultural patterns and outside influences differ among families, which are necessary components for teachers in fostering collaborative connections with the different family types. The roles of teachers as protectors against abuses such as bullying, federal laws behind inclusive practices for children with disabilities, and how teachers aid in supporting families will be explored. Students also analyse strategies in establishing both communicative and collaborative relationships among the three social settings (family, school, and community). 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the causes of the increased professionalization of teaching in the United States today and the ramifications of this phenomenon; link educational philosophies to applied educational practices; describe the development of American education and the factors that have influenced it, from roots in classical Western civilization through the current times; compare and contrast different theories of education, curriculum and instruction, and apply them; apply principles of multicultural education to classroom instruction identify at-risk behaviors and proper responses to such behaviors; and identify methods that can decrease or remove racial, ethnic or gender gaps in education.

Instruction:

This course provides a broad study of the philosophical and social foundations of education in the United States. Students become proficient in terminologies, educational theories, practice and legislation relevant to the American educational system. Students link previously developed educational ideas to present practices and compare and contrast the benefits and deficiencies of the applications of these ideas. 

Credit recommendation:

In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: facilitate students’ understanding of expository text material and content-specific vocabulary; plan for and provide a literate classroom environment to meet the diverse needs of all students; plan meaningful literacy experiences that integrate reading, writing, listening and communicating competencies in content area teaching; interact with students, colleagues, parents and community members to enhance literacy development; demonstrate a basic understanding of reading assessments for students and text; incorporate instructional technology into the preparation and teaching of lessons to enhance literacy development; and use critical and creative thinking skills relevant to course content and appropriate to student needs in planning lessons.

Instruction:

Literacy Instruction for Secondary Education is a self-study course with 15 weekly lessons. The primary purpose of this course is to provide preservice teachers with information and experiences that will help them develop and deliver effective instructional reading programs for students in secondary grades (7-12). The course focuses on study of theories and methods for integrating literacy instruction in content area classrooms. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education or Secondary Education (6/19).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: recognize models that explain challenging behavior; evaluate positive behavior interventions and supports; describe rules and procedures to prevent challenging behaviors; recommend effective use of scheduling, climate, and classroom planning and organization to prevent challenging behavior; explain high-quality instruction to prevent challenging behavior; describe behavioral monitoring to prevent challenging behavior; justify reasons to implement functional assessment; summarize how to effectively implement social skills instruction; and explain how to effectively prevent challenging behavior through reinforcement strategies.

Instruction:

Managing the Environment is designed to prepare Special Education educators to manage learning environments and student behaviors in the special education classroom, as well as the inclusive classroom setting. Instruction focuses on the theoretical foundations of classroom management by providing a physical, emotional, and social environment that is safe, supportive, and conducive to learning. This course emphasizes positive behavior interventions and supports, or Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS), an umbrella term that refers to a wide array of individual and systemic strategies to teach and strengthen appropriate behavior and to reduce challenging behavior. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format

Length:

Varies; self-study

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define theories and principles of classroom management, including characteristics of effective and productive environments for learning; identify theories and principles of instructional methodologies, with emphasis on practices related to effective classrooms; discuss realities and structures of the teaching profession; learn how to design, plan and implement instruction that includes lesson planning, unit and course design and writing instructional objectives; design and implement classroom management plans that use effective classroom management strategies (maintaining a positive environment; motivating students and fostering student learning; model various methods of instruction; recognize individual differences of students and determining strategies to provide equitable instruction; and organize and manage use of time for instructional and non-instructional tasks.

Instruction:

This self-study course consists of 15 weekly lessons. Grading is based on writing assignments and a final examination. The primary purpose of this course is to provide pre-service teachers with information and experiences that will help learners develop and deliver effective instructional programs for students in secondary grades (7-12). Major areas of focus include: the nature of the teaching and learning process, including research-based models of instruction; planning, classroom management, learning environments and motivation. Pre-service teachers will become familiar with and demonstrate evidence of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for effective beginning teaching. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss federal regulations related to children with exceptionalities; describe the characteristics of various types of exceptionalities, including those with health impairments and their special health care needs; practice various instructional approaches appropriate for exceptional children; utilize educational programming and resources, including assistive technologies and adaptive equipment appropriate for various types of exceptionalities; discuss the role of the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) and Individualized Education Program (IEP) in the educational planning process for young children; use screening and assessment to support the learning and service needs of exceptional children; discuss the function of Child Find and teachers' roles in that process; and facilitate school, family, and community collaboration strategies to serve the needs of exceptional children.

Instruction:

Teaching Students with Disabilities and Special Healthcare provides thorough coverage of legislative issues on Special Education, especially the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The course examines topics related to children with disabilities and special needs, and allows students to be acquainted with children’s profiles and school performance, in the context of analyzing comprehensive details to identify and evaluate students with learning disabilities. Additional topics include: designing an appropriate Individualized Education Program (IEP), developing individualized instructions and using effective instructional strategies. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Education Psychology or Special Education (8/18).

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