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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Accounting and Finance - Consortium for International Studies

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study.

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define and describe an accounting system; understand how business transactions can be recorded in terms of the resulting change in the elements of the accounting equation; describe and illustrate the journalizing and posting of transactions to accounts, prepare adjusting entries for accruals, deferrals, and depreciation; describe the flow of accounting information from the unadjusted trial balance into the adjusted trial balance and financial statements; distinguish between the activities and financial statements of service and merchandising businesses; and describe payroll accounting systems that use a payroll register, employee earnings records, and a general journal.

Instruction:

This self-study course includes 15 weekly lessons which provide a basic introduction to the standards underlying financial accounting systems. Topics include: creating and interpreting income statements, balance sheets, and cash flow statements, as well as liabilities related to accounts payable, current portion of long-term debt, and notes payable, participants will have the opportunity to learn introductory accounting terms and their application in the business environment. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting 1, Principles of Accounting, or Financial Accounting (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe and illustrate the characteristics of stock, classes of stock, and entries for issuing stock; describe and illustrate the reporting of long-term liabilities, including bonds and installment notes payable; describe and illustrate the use of free cash flow in evaluating a company’s cash flow; define and illustrate the following costs: direct and indirect costs; direct materials, direct labor, and factory overhead costs, and product and period costs; and describe the basic elements of the budget process, the two major types of budgeting, and the use of computers in budgeting.

Instruction:

Accounting II is a self-study course comprised of 15 weekly lessons and comprehensive exams. The course continues the study of accounting topics following completion of Accounting I. Prerequisite: Accounting I.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Principles of Accounting, or Managerial Accounting (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: understand why individuals and corporations invest; review financial statements and understand what they reveal about an organization; understand value of money, estimate an organization’s cost of capital; define the difference between a primary and secondary capital market and how the two markets support each other; understand investment and budgeting opportunities; and explore the concept of risk and the trade-off between risk and return.

Instruction:

This course includes 15 weekly lessons. The course explores advanced financial concepts associated with corporate finance. Financial statement analysis, risk and return trade-off, the time value of money, cost of capital, and equity valuation are the key concepts explored. Additionally, students study hedge funds, capital markets, and how individual and corporate investments differ. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Advanced Finance, Financial Risk Analysis, or Securities Analysis (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study.

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the types of securities traded within financial markets; understand how financial institutions were exposed to the credit crisis; describe the role of financial institutions within financial markets; explain the theories behind the term structure of interest rates; understand the role of the Federal Reserve; understand the methods of measuring risk-adjusted stock performance; describe the different types of bonds and their characteristics,;identify the factors that affect stock prices, explain how stock index futures contracts are used to hedge based on anticipated stock price movements; explain the risks of interest rate swap and how they are priced; and explain how credit default swaps are used to reduce credit risk and how the swap markets have become globalized.

Instruction:

In this course, students explore key principles associated with financial markets and institutions around the world. Students learn about types of financial markets available and their functions, various financial institutions that facilitate the flow of funds, why speculators take positions in stock options and how the outcome is determined, in addition to how stock index options are used by institutional investors. Advanced topics include: potential problems with using excessive financial leverage that lead to leveraged buyouts, the role of the bond markets in facilitating corporate capital restructuring, characteristics of financial instruments, monetary policy, the banking industry, mortgages, and the role of the Federal Reserve.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Finance, Financial Markets and Institutions, or Money and Capital Markets (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: compare and contrast Multinational Corporation’s (MNC) decision-making process; differentiate between ethical and unethical behaviors for U.S. businesses operating in foreign markets; analyze foreign exchange markets and the factors and risks influencing exchange rates; demonstrate different methods of arbitrage and interest rate parity used by international governments; use forecasting exchange methods for business modeling, illustrate an MNC’s capital budget process; plan international cash management by optimizing cash flow and assessing the impact of liquidity requirements; and analyze the impact of long-term debt financing and match it to the inflow currency.

Instruction:

International Finance is an upper level course designed to provide students with an understanding of financial management issues in a global setting. Instruction focuses on analytical tools that incorporate key international considerations with fundamental financial decisions. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in International Finance (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain what finance entails and why everyone should understand basic financial concepts; explain financial markets in the United States and how they differ from financial markets in other parts of the world; describe how changes in interest rates (returns) affect the values of stocks and bonds; discuss the role of ethics in successful businesses; explain what it means to take risks when investing; describe the relevant cash flows that must be forecast to make informed capital budgeting decisions; and explain what working capital is and why proper management of working capital is critical to the survival of a firm.

Instruction:

This course includes 15 weekly lessons. The course introduces key concepts of finance and covers three general areas: financial markets and institutions, managerial finance, and investments. Topics include the time value of money, risk and return, investment analysis and strategy, budgeting, forecasting, and future considerations of the field of finance. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Finance, Principles of Finances, or Financial Management (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the background of investing, the function of securities markets and the purpose and types of investment companies; identify the role that macroeconomic factors have on securities analysis; discuss portfolio diversification; compare the different types of options and demonstrate their valuation and function; assess portfolio performance; describe the role that taxes, inflation and investor types play in investment management; analyze financial statements; illustrate the valuation of equity securities; and identify theoretical valuations of equity securities. 

Instruction:

This self-study course includes 15 weekly lessons. The final grade is based on a final exam and two writing assignments. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of tools and techniques for fundamental analysis, the concept of investment risk and investment management.  Students learn how to examine security valuation and identify risk measurement strategies.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Finance, Introduction to Investments, Principles of Investments, or Securities Analysis (8/18).

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