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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Psychology and Sociology - Consortium for International Studies

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format

Length:

Varies; self-study.

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss and interpret the definition of abnormal behavior; provide a historical overview of abnormal psychology; interpret and explain research methodologies used for describing and explaining abnormal psychology; define and discuss classification, diagnosis, and assessment of various disorders; and identify and discuss assessment techniques.

Instruction:

Major topics include disorders and abnormalities of the human body and mind. This course also explores different methods of treatment for disorders, as well as the various causes for these disorders. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Abnormal Psychology or Psychology (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define the development of children: cognitively, socially and emotionally; discuss how to control a classroom for the purpose of optimal student learning; explore different ways to incorporate many cultures into the classroom; explore recent trends in the teaching profession; define the psychology behind learning; gain insight into how to teach students with special needs; and identify the benefits and pitfalls of different types of assessments and employ methodology for planning instruction and curriculum. 

Instruction:

This self-study course includes 15 weekly lessons. This course explains the methodology behind classroom control, teaching to children with special needs and assessments. Additionally, the course explores different strategies, ideas, and incentives to help teachers gain better understanding of the classroom. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Educational Psychology, Education, or Psychology (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define the origins of psychology; identify which ancient countries and cultures contributed to psychology; discuss the different contributors to psychology; discuss the systems that govern the field of psychology; and identify each of the five different branches of psychology, including the similarities and differences among them.

Instruction:

This course covers the history and systems of modern psychology, including the different schools of thought and understandings that align with modern day psychology.  The course couples these various schools of thought together with their roots and foundations. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self- study.

Dates:

September 2018 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe developmental theoretical perspectives and research methods; understand genetic and environmental influences on development; analyze research and theory regarding cognitive, emotional, and social childhood development; interpret research and theory regarding cognitive, emotional and social development in adolescence and early adulthood; and investigate research and theory regarding cognitive, emotional, and social development in middle and late adulthood.

Instruction:

Topics include: various aspects of human development, including social, emotional, biological, and cognitive human growth; and stages of human development from adolescence up to late adulthood.  The final grade is based on a final examination. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Work, or Counseling (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify key concepts, models, and principles regarding psychological research methods, human biology, consciousness, development and human diversity, sensation and perception; apply the concepts of basic learning, memory, cognition, language, and intelligence concepts, structures, and processes; and explain key theories and research findings regarding emotions, stress, personality, and psychological disorders.

Instruction:

The course examines the human mind and the causes of behavior. Students learn the major areas of psychology as well as the history of psychology as a whole. Students also explore current theories of motivation, cognition, and behavior. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/ associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Psychology or Counseling (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study.

Dates:

September 2018 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: apply major sociological concepts to understand and explain the world within they live; identify patterns of social behavior and how social arrangements shape peoples’ behavior and choices; identify connections between various social issues (i.e. body image and gender inequality); cultivate critical thinking skills by asking questions, evaluating arguments, and exploring alternative points of view; and develop a more complex understanding of a position in the social world in relation to other individuals and other groups.

Instruction:

This course discusses human social behavior along with theories and concepts that cultivate a sociological perspective of the human race. The course is taught in 15 weekly lessons and includes a textbook, study guide, and a final examination. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Sociology (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study.

Dates:

September 2018 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe key principles of physiological psychology, psychopharmacology, physiological research methods, and the critical role of the nervous system; analyze the physiology behind sensation, perception, sleeping, eating, and feeling; evaluate the physiology of learning, memory, and communication processes; and explain physiological factors involved in neurological, anxiety-related, schizophrenia-related, and addictive disorders.

Instruction:

The course explores physiological psychology, related to the biological influences on human and animal behavior. Topics include: structures and functions of the nervous system, psychopharmacology and research methods, the senses, movement, emotion, eating/digestion, learning, memory, and the neurology of psychological disorders. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physiological Psychology or Psychology (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study.

Dates:

September 2018 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe psychological research method goals, processes, descriptive techniques, and correlational techniques; explain the principles of experimentation, the role of variables, and the types of validity and reliability; apply knowledge of experimental design and small-n experimentation; investigate quasi-experimental design, results interpretation, and results presentation; and plan, conduct, interpret and disseminate original research.

Instruction:

This 15-week course investigates various forms of psychological research and includes topics such as research methods, processes, techniques and research design.  Instructional methods include a textbook and study guide. Students are evaluated based on a final examination.  

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology, Introduction to Research Methods in Social Work, or Introduction to Research Methods in Sociology (8/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study. 

Dates:

September 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss Jewish food practices from Biblical times through present day, inclusive of Ashkenazic and Sephardic customs as well as current American and Israeli foods; explain the religious and symbolic reasons for special festival foods, unique weekday foods, and food taboos; compare and contrast the differences between Jewish cultures and reasons for food variety; identify patterns in factors that affect Jewish food choices; and discuss various definitions and opinions of what is considered Jewish food.

Instruction:

This self-study course includes 15 weekly lessons. This course assesses students' knowledge of the social history of Jewish food, including Biblical and Talmudic concepts and rules of food and customs that have been adopted over the centuries in Jewish settlements in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and more recently in the United States and Israel. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Jewish Studies, Anthropology, History, or Religion (8/18).

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