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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Active Learning Experiences - Dale Carnegie & Associates, Inc.

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

Version 1: 28 hours (8 weeks). Version 2 and 3: 8 weeks (28 hours).

Dates:

Version 1: November 2011 - June 2015. Version 2: July 2015 - September 2018. Version 3: October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: build team confidence and risk taking skills; distinguish between the foundations of planning and decision-making; strengthen people and team engagement skills; enhance communication for team results; cultivate 360-degree organization leadership skills; and reduce team stress and improve team attitudes.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: The methods of instruction include practical exercises, learner presentations, lectures, discussion, and classroom exercise. The general course topics include foundations for organizational success; find and address organizational opportunities; communicate and lead competently assertively; take initiative to improve results; influence styles and strategies; become a charismatic business communicator; demonstrate assertive leadership; influence growth and change; coaching for organizational results; manage organizational and team stressors; team leadership: how to grow through conflict; all win negotiations: a human relations approach; team member engagement championship; achieve work life balance; and rally people around results and renew vision.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Organizational Behavior or Management (6/11) (7/15) (10/18).

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 16 hours (2 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: January 1998 - June 2015. Version 2: July 2015 - September 2018. Version 3: October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1, 2 and 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to plan and organize professional presentations; create and maintain a positive impression; and communicate ideas with clarity and force.

Instruction:

Version 1: Methods of instruction include: group discussion, audio visual materials, modeling, planning, developing and delivering presentations, interactive coaching, videotaping and feedback, and self-assessment. The general course topics include planning and organizing professional presentations, creating and maintaining a positive impression, communicating ideas with clarity and force, selling ideas, and inspiring others. Version 2 and 3: Methods of instruction include: audio visual materials, practical exercises, learner presentations, lecture, discussion, and classroom exercise. The general course topics include: creating a positive first impression; increase credibility; present complex information; communicate with greater impact; motivate others to action; respond to pressure situations; and inspire people to embrace change.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Speech or Oral Communication (11/99) (8/03) (8/07) (6/11). Version 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Oral communication (7/15) (10/18).

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

Version 1: 42 hours (12 weeks;  plus 18 hours of outside preparation). Version 2: 42 hours (12 weeks). Version 3, 4, and 5: 28 hours (8 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: January 1983 - September 1995. Version 2: October 1995 - December 1999. Version 3: January 2000 - June 2015. Version 4: July 2015 - September 2018. Version 5: October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to plan sales presentations; communicate effectively with prospective buyers; and stimulate interest of prospective buyers. Version 3: Upon completion of this program, students will be able to: evaluate the effectiveness of sales presentations; analyze sales opportunities; evaluate customer needs; create solutions; design and deliver sales presentations; and apply a professional selling process. Version 4 and 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: identify common standards and procedures specific to generating sales; understand how to build rapport and generate product interest; and identify ways to address customer problems and create selling opportunities.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics are: organizing and preparing a sales presentation, qualifying prospects, managing time effectively, developing accounts, closing the sale, and prospecting for new clients. Methods of instruction include: lecture, discussion, classroom exercises that emphasize participation, written and oral reports that provide instructor/student interaction, evaluation of progress.. Version 2: Major topics are organizing and preparing a sales presentation, qualifying prospects, managing time effectively, developing accounts, closing the sale, and prospecting for new clients. Methods of instruction include lecture; discussion; classroom exercises that emphasize participation, such as contests and role playing; written and oral reports that provide instructor/student interaction; observations, sales presentations, mid-point feedback and final course assessments, and evaluation of progress. Version 3:  Methods of instruction include: lecture; discussions; classroom exercises that emphasize participation,  written and oral reports that provide instructor/student interaction, "in the moment" coching,teachable moments, sales presentations, real world application with accountability reoprts, and final course assessments, and evaluation of progress. The general course topics include organizing and pareparing a sales presentation, qualifying prospects, managing time effectively, devaloping accounts, closing the sald and prospecting for new clients. Version 4 and 5: The methods of instruction include: practical exercises, learner presentations, lecture, discussion, and classroom exercise. The general course topics include building rapport; generate interest; provide solutions; resolve objections; appeal to motives and gain commitment; uncover opportunities; planning; and sales process.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in the Principles and Practice of Selling (4/83) (5/88) (5/94). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Salesmanship or Marketing (7/99). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Sales (6/00) (8/03) (8/07) (6/11). Version 4 and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in sales (7/15) (10/18).  NOTE: Students may not receive credit for this course and How to Sell Like a Pro DLCR-0012.

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

 Version 1: 24 hours (8 weeks). Version 2 and 3: 28 hours (8 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: June 1999 - August 2010. Version 2: July 2015 - September 2018. Version 3: October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: develop a personal vision; set and achieve personal goals; and understand and apply the basic principles of interpersonal and public communication, leadership, and stress management necessary to function effectively in both personal, academic, and career settings. Version 2 and 3: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: identify techniques to improve self-confidence; strengthen people and human relations skills; enhance communication skills; incorporate basic leadership skills into a variety of settings; and apply tools to reduce stress and improve attitude.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics are personal development (enhancing self-confidence, setting and achieving goals, and managing stress); interpersonal communication (conversation skills, listening, giving directions, providing and receiving feedback, and managing conflict); public speaking (topic selection, content development and organization, and verbal and non-verbal elements of delivery); and leadership. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, classroom exercises, learner presentations/reports, outside readings and assignments, instructor and student evaluation of progress, observation, self-assessment, reports, application projects, goal-setting, breakthrough plans, and mid-point and final evaluations. Version 2 and 3: Methods of instruction include practical exercises, learner presentations, lecture, discussion, and classroom exercises. The general course topics include increase self-confidence; put stress in perspective; enhance relationships; energize communications; manage stress; demonstrate leadership; and renew a vision.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Communications, Speech, or Interpersonal Skills (6/00) (8/03) (8/07). NOTE: Credit is not recommended if student has already received credit for Oral Communication and Interpersonal Skills (Dale Carnegie Course [DCC-1]). Version 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Communications or Interpersonal Skills (7/15) (10/18). NOTE: Students may not receive credit for this course and DLCR-0001 Effective Communications and Human Relations. NOTE: Please note time lapse in the course offering dates. 

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

Version 1: 18 hours (6 weeks, plus 9 hours of outside preparation). Version 2: 21 hours (6 weeks, plus Orientation). Version 3: 24 hours (7 weeks). Version 4: 21 hours (3 days). Version 5: 24.5 hours (7 weeks). Version 6 and 7:  28 hours (7 weeks) or 24 hours (3 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: January 1981 - June 1999. Version 2: July 1999 - December 1999. Version 3: January 2000 - May 2006. Version 4: June 2006 - May 2011. Version 5: June 2011 - June 2015. Version 6: July 2015 - September 2018. Version 7: October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Major topics covered in the course are creative process, planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, delegating, controlling, decision making, communicating, motivating, and interpersonal skills. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, outside readings, instructor evaluation of classroom exercises, case studies, and three required papers. Version 2, 3 and 4: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: apply effectively the principles of management and team building that enhances their performance as managers. Version 5: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create a shared vision; develop organizational plans and strategies; manage meetings; influence others and empower them to deliver results; systematically solve organizational problems; demonstrate the planning process; communicate to lead; lead innovative change; effectively delegate responsibilities; conduct performance appraisals; and coach people to higher levels of performance. Version 6 and 7: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: discover how experiences, beliefs, and values shape leadership style and discover the impact of that style on the organization's environment and culture; develop human potential and build relationships of mutual trust and respect; create and maintain processes and procedures that drive innovation, plan and define performance goals, utilize time effectively, delegate, analyze problems, and make decisions; develop leadership by demonstrating effective questioning and listening skills: one-on-one, in small groups, and leading problem-solving meetings; and balance the desired outcomes of visions and plans with an accurate assessment of actual performance, and hold others accountable to predetermined results.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics covered in the course are: creative process, planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, delegating, controlling, decision-making, communicating, motivating, and interpersonal skills. Methods of instruction include: lecture, discussion, outside readings, instructor evaluation of classroom exercises, case studies, and three required papers. Version 2: Major topics covered in the course are: creative process, planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, delegating, controlling, decision making, communicating, motivating, and interpersonal skills. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, outside readings, role playing, teamwork, instructor evaluation of classroom exercises, case studies, learner presentation/reports, application projects, final course assessment, and required papers. Version 3: Major topics covered in the course are: self-direction, people skills, process skills, communication skills, and accountability. Methods of instruction include: self-assessment, reports, small group work, projects, large group discussion, demonstrations, case studies, role play, instructor coaching, use of examples, project reports, mid-point evaluation, final evaluation, and use of a leadership plan. Version 4: Major topics covered in this course include: developing personal leadership; understanding the innovation process; performance; problem analysis and decision making; delegation; communication and turning ideas into action. Methods of instruction include: self-assessment, reports, small group work, projects, large group discussion, demonstrations, case studies, role play, instructor coaching, use of examples, project reports, mid-point evaluation, final evaluation, and use of a leadership plan. Version 5: Methods of instruction include: self-assessment, practical exercises, discussion, presentation, lecture, case study, demonstrations, role play, coaching, application projects, outcome reports, and leadership plan. The general course topics include: personal leadership, organizational results, the innovation process, the planning process, the performance process, appraisal systems, coaching, the delegation process, problem analysis and decision making, recognizing human potential, the continuous improvement process, leading meetings, time management and accountability, and communications.Version 6 and 7: The methods of instruction include case studies, practical exercises, learner presentations, lecture, discussion, and classroom exercise. The general course topics include innovation and planning; performance process and accountability; coaching and appraisal; problem solving and decision making; delegation; handling mistakes; communicating and leading meetings; and continuous improvement.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Management (4/83) (5/88) (5/94). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Leadership or Management (7/99). Version 3 and 4: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Leadership or Management (6/00) (8/03) (8/07). NOTE: Credit should not be awarded if the student has already received credit for the course The Leadership Advantage DLCR-0013. Version 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Business, Leadership, Organizational Behavior, Management, or Business Communications (6/11). NOTE: Credit should not be awarded if students have already received credit for the course The Leadership Advantage DLCR-0013. Version 6: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Leadership or Human Relations (7/15) (10/18).  NOTE: Students may not receive credit for this course and  The Leadership Advantage DLCR-0013.

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 17.5 hours (5 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2012 - September 2018. Version 2:  October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: manage stress more effectively; practice greater self-confidence; demonstrate improved time management; apply tools to effectively control attitude; apply goal setting; and practice a balanced life.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Methods of instruction include: audio visual materials, practical exercises, learner presentations, and lecture, discussion, and classroom exercises. The general topics include: work-life balance; multi-tasking; stress reduction; communicating with different personality styles; emotional control; staying positive; and avoiding burn-out.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Stress Management (7/15) (10/18).

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 24 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Version 1: April 2003 - June 2015. Version 2: July 2015 - September 2018. Version 3: October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: develop a personal vision; set and achieve personal goals; understand and apply the basic principles of interpersonal and business communication, understand and apply motivation techniques; apply listening and speaking skills, apply human relations skills to enhance relationships, and manage stress in order to function effectively in both professional and social settings. Version 2 and 3:  Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: understand the characteristics of communication and interpersonal interaction; develop an ability to assess the appropriateness and effectiveness of interpersonal strategies used in various interpersonal and professional situations; develop skill in selecting and using a variety of communication strategies and responses based on work situational and organizational goals; understand how perception affects communication; communicate both verbally and nonverbally in order to meet reach organizational goals; and recognize the role of communication in determining the nature and quality of interpersonal relationships, as well as how and why relationships develop.

Instruction:

Version 1: Methods of instruction include: lecture, discussion, classroom exercises, and presentations/reports, outside readings and assignments, trainer and student evaluation of progress, observation and self-assessment. The general course topics include: personal development and business skills (enhancing self-confidence, setting and achieving goals, and managing stress); interpersonal communication (conversation skills, listening, giving directions, providing and receiving feedback, and managing conflict); pubic speaking (topic selection, content development and organization, and verbal and nonverbal elements of delivery); and motivation/leadership skills. Version 2 and 3: The methods of instruction include: practical exercises, learner presentations, lecture, discussion, and classroom exercise. The general course topics include personal and small group communication; motivation skills; delegation; conflict resolution; stress management; and building greater self-confidence.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Communications (5/04) (8/07) (6/11). NOTE: Credit should not be awarded if students have already received credit for the course Oral Communications and Interpersonal Skills. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in  Interpersonal Communication (7/15) (10/18). NOTE: Students may not receive credit for this course and Effective Communications and Human Relations DLCR-0001.

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 28  hours (8 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: June 2011 - June 2015. Version 2: July 2015 - September 2018. Version 3: October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1: The course objective is to enhance students' personal growth, self-confidence, self-awareness and human relations skills and to provide them with successful communication skills necessary to be effective in interpersonal and business settings. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to develop a personal vision and greater self-confidence; understand and apply the principles of interpersonal communication; understand and apply motivation and leadership techniques; apply listening and speaking skills; apply human relations skills to enhance relationships and manage stress in order to function effectively in both professional and social settings. Version 2 and 3:  The course objective is to enable students to maximize their performance, become stronger leaders and add more value to the organization. The course teaches students to build greater self-confidence, strengthen people skills, enhance communication skills, develop leadership skills, reduce stress, and improve attitude.

Instruction:

Versions 1: Methods of instruction include: lecture, discussion, classroom exercises, presentations and reports, outside readings and assignments, trainer and student evaluation of progress, observation and self-assessment. The general program topics include personal development and business skills (enhancing self-confidence, setting and achieving goals, and managing stress); interpersonal communication (conversation skills, listening, giving directions, providing and receiving feedback, and managing conflict); pubic speaking (topic selection, content development and organization, and verbal and nonverbal elements of delivery); and motivation/leadership skills. Version 2 and 3: The methods of instruction include practical exercises, learner presentations, lecture, discussion, and classroom exercise. The general course topics include demonstrate leadership; celebrate achievements and renew vision; manage stress; develop more flexibility; build others through recognition; inspire others; energize communication; make ideas clear; disagree agreeably; gain willing cooperation and commit to influence others; put stress in perspective; enhance relationships and motivate others; build on memory skills and enhance relationships; increase self-confidence; build a foundation for success; and recall and use names.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fundamentals of Public Speaking or Human Relations or (6/11). NOTE: Credit should not be awarded if students have already received credit for the Dale Carnegie Course: Effective Communications and Human Relations. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fundamentals of Public Speaking or Human Relations (7/15). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in communications  (10/18).  NOTE: Students may not receive credit for this course and Effective Communications and Human Relations (DLCR-0001).  

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

Version 1: 49 hours (14 weeks). Version 2, 3 , 4 , 5, and 6: 42 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: January 1980 - March 1991. Version 2: April 1991 - December 1998. Version 3: January 1999 - May 2011. Version 4: June 2011 - June 2015. Version 5: July 2015 - September 2018. Version 6: October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, 3 and 4: Upon completion of this program, students will be able to develop and communicate a personal vision; set and achieve personal goals; and understand and apply the basic principles of interpersonal and public communication, leadership, and stress management necessary to function effectively in both professional and social settings. Version 5 and 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to develop a personal vision; identify principles for improving human relations; enhance professional communication skills; and explore leadership principles to increase productivity and efficiency in the workplace.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics covered in the course are organization and presentation of ideas, improving memory, setting goals, developing self-confidence, dealing with stress, building positive relationships, problem solving, and interpersonal skills. Methods of instruction include discussion, classroom exercises, outside readings, and instructor and student evaluation of progress. Major topics covered in the course are personal development (enhancing self-confidence, setting and achieving goals, and managing stress); interpersonal communication (conversation skills, listening, giving directions, providing and receiving feedback, and managing conflict); public speaking (topic selection, content development and organization, and verbal and nonverbal elements of delivery); and leadership. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, classroom exercises, learner presentations/reports, outside readings and assignments, instructor and student evaluation of progress, observations, and self-assessment. Version 2 and 3: Major topics include: organization and presentation of ideas, improving memory, setting goals, developing self-confidence, dealing with stress, building positive relationships, problem solving, and interpersonal skills. Methods of instruction include discussion, classroom exercises, outside readings, and instructor and student evaluation of progress. Version 4: Methods of instruction include discussion, classroom exercises, outside readings, reflections, and instructor and student evaluation of progress. The general course topics include organization and presentation of ideas, improving memory, setting goals, developing self-confidence, dealing with stress, building positive relationships, problem solving, and interpersonal skills. Version 5 and 6: The methods of instruction include practical exercises, learner presentations, lecture, discussion, and classroom exercise. The general course topics include building a foundation for success; recall and use names; build on memory skills and enhance relationships; increase self-confidence; put stress in perspective; enhance relationships and motivate others; energize communication; make ideas clear; disagree agreeably; gain willing cooperation and commit to influence others; manage our stress; develop more flexibility; building others through recognition; inspire others; demonstrate leadership; and celebrate achievements and renew vision.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Speech, Communications, or Organizational Behavior (4/83) (5/88) (5/94) (7/99) . Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communications or Speech  (8/03) (10/05) (8/07). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fundamentals of Communication or Fundamentals of Speech (6/11).  NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for this course and Strictly Business: The Dale Carnegie Immersion Seminar or Dale Carnegie Course: Skills for Success. Version 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Communications (7/15). Version 6: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Interpersonal Communications or Public Speaking (10/18). NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for this course and Strictly Business: The Dale Carnegie Immersion Seminar or Dale Carnegie Course: Skills for Success. 

Location:
Various locations worldwide.
Length:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: 24 hours (3 days).

Dates:

Version 1: March 2004 - December 2004. Version 2: January 2005 - August 2010. Version 3: July 2015 - September 2018. Version 4: October 2018 - September 2021. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply effectively the principles of management and team building that enhance management performance. Version 2: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: effectively apply the principles of management and team building that enhance management performance. Version 3 and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify leadership styles and strengths; understand the importance of networking; learn to network in different settings; and identify the challenges and rewards associated with teamwork.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: creative process, planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and delegating, controlling, decision-making, communicating, motivating, and interpersonal skills. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, outside readings, trainer evaluation of classroom exercises, case studies, and three required papers. Major topics covered in the course are self-direction, people skills, process skills, communication skills, and accountability. Version 2: Major topics include: developing personal leadership; understanding the innovation process; performance; problem analysis and decision making; delegation; communication and turning ideas into action. Methods of instruction include self-assessment, reports, small group work, projects, large group discussion, demonstrations, case studies, role play, instructor coaching, use of examples, project reports, mid-point evaluation, final evaluation, and use of a leadership plan. Version 3 and 4: The methods of instruction include: practical exercises, learner presentations, lecture, discussion, and classroom exercise. The general course topics include visionary leadership; develop strategy; provide solutions; increase communication; appeal to motives and gain commitment; evaluate processes; and motivate others.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Leadership or Management (5/04) (8/07) (7/15) (10/18). NOTE: Credit should not be awarded, if students have already received credit for the course Leadership Training for Managers (DLCR-0002).

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