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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies - Jewish Studies

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Formerly:
Advanced Laws and Concepts of Prayer (Jewish Thought 210)
Length:

Versions 1, 2 and 3: Varies; self-study format.  

Dates:

Version 1: October 2010 - July 2021. Version 2: August 2021 - June 2022. Version 3: July 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Versions 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a thorough knowledge about the meanings and sources of Jewish daily prayers; show an understanding of the concepts, philosophy, and religious issues necessary to properly apply the laws of Jewish prayer in various circumstances; and distinguish between the various categories of prayer and explain their significance. Version 3: Versions 1 and 2, and additional outcomes. 

Instruction:

Versions 1 and 2: The final examination assesses students' ability to express in-depth knowledge of the theory and practice of Jewish daily prayer, including knowledge of their meanings, customs, and origins. Topics include: the Jewish prayer book; the blessings; psalms; verses from Tenach, the Shema, the Amida, and times for prayer. Version 3: Additional readings and materials were added. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, or Religion (8/21 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, or Religion (7/22 administrative review). 

Formerly:
Advanced Topics in Blessings-Part I (Jewish Thought 350)
Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: October 2010 - June 2022. Version 2: July 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply theoretical law in the following areas of the laws of blessings: underlying meanings and reasons for blessings; principles of saying the name of God; saying amen; principles of intention; using non-Hebrew language; joint responsibility; blessings are inappropriate; sequence of blessings; and loss of connection to blessings. Version 2: Same as version 1 with additional outcomes: identify on a pictorial display the amount of food or drink necessary to consume to be obligated in the after blessing or the grace said after meals; analyze the meaning of blessings; and discuss what constitutes an interruption in a meal or blessing sequence. 

Instruction:

Version 1: The final examination assesses students' ability to express in-depth knowledge about the Jewish laws and customs concerning blessings; understanding of concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze underlying premises of the principles laws and customs and apply them to novel situations. Version 2: Reading materials were added representing a variety of sources and multiple perspectives; study materials were added. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation) (8/21 revalidation). Version 2: In the upper division degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (7/22 administrative review). 

Length:

Varies; self-study format.  

Dates:

Version 1: October 2010 - June 2022. Version 2: July 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply theoretical law in the following areas of the laws of blessings: disassociation from a blessing; changing places; specific parameters of principle and subsidiary items; parameters of what constitutes a meal;  types of bread, cooked bread, and raw and cooked grains. Version 2: Same as version 1 with additional outcomes: discuss different food manufacturing processes and the implication they would have on blessings; identify the amount of food or drink necessary to consume to be obligated in the after blessing or the grace after meals; perform an in depth analysis of the meaning of blessings; and discuss what constitutes an interruption in a meal or blessing sequence. 

Instruction:

Version 1: The final examination assesses students' ability to express in-depth knowledge about the Jewish laws and customs concerning blessings; demonstrate understanding of concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze underlying premises of the principle laws and customs; and apply them to novel situations. Version 2: Reading materials and sources were added representing a variety of perspectives; study materials were expanded. Course delivery options expanded. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation) (8/21 revalidation). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (7/22 administrative review). 

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: October 2010 - June 2022. Version 2: July 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply theoretical law; demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze underlying premises of the principle laws and customs; and apply them to novel situations. Version 2: Same as version 1 with additional outcomes: identify food items and their corresponding blessing; determine the amount of food or drink necessary to consume to be obligated in the after blessing or the grace said after meals; conduct an analysis of the meaning of blessings; and differentiate between the food manufacturing process in modern times and its impact on the appropriate blessing as opposed to similar food items that were manufactured differently in the past. 

Instruction:

Version 1: The final examination assesses students' ability to express knowledge about the fundamental Jewish laws and customs concerning blessings. Topics include: structure of a blessing; blessings made in vain; amen; discharging the obligation of others; initial blessings; sequence of blessings; principle versus subsidiary items; what is considered staples (mezonos); blessings on fruits and vegetables; wine, vegetable and fruit soups; and the general blessing of Shehakol. Version 2: Reading materials were added and study materials were expanded. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation) (8/21 revalidation). NOTE: Students who complete the exam without the use of their notebooks could receive graduate credit. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, or Religion (7/22 administrative review). 

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