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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies - Jewish Studies

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Formerly:
Advanced Laws and Concepts of Prayer (Jewish Thought 210)
Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format.  

Dates:
October 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a thorough knowledge about the meanings and sources of Jewish daily prayers; show an understanding of the concepts, philosophy, and religious issues necessary to properly apply the laws of Jewish prayer in various circumstances; and distinguish between the various categories of prayer and explain their significance.

Instruction:

The Jewish Studies 210 proficiency examination assesses students' ability to express in-depth knowledge of the theory and practice of Jewish daily prayer, including knowledge of their meanings, customs, and origins. Topics include: the Jewish prayer book; the blessings; psalms; verses from Tenach, the Shema, the Amida, and times for prayer.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation).

Formerly:
Advanced Topics in Blessings-Part I (Jewish Thought 350)
Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:
October 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply theoretical law in the following areas of the laws of blessings: underlying meanings and reasons for blessings; principles of saying the name of God; saying amen; principles of intention; using non-Hebrew language; joint responsibility; blessings are inappropriate; sequence of blessings; and loss of connection to blessings.

Instruction:

The Jewish Studies 350 proficiency examination assesses students' ability to express in-depth knowledge about the Jewish laws and customs concerning blessings; understanding of concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze underlying premises of the principles laws and customs and apply them to novel situations.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation).

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format.  

Dates:
October 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply theoretical law in the following areas of the laws of blessings: disassociation from a blessing; changing places; specific parameters of principle and subsidiary items; parameters of what constitutes a meal;  types of bread, cooked bread, and raw and cooked grains.

Instruction:

The Jewish Studies 360 proficiency examination assesses students' ability to express in-depth knowledge about the Jewish laws and customs concerning blessings; demonstrate understanding of concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze underlying premises of the principle laws and customs; and apply them to novel situations.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation). 

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format.  

Dates:
October 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a thorough knowledge about the inner meaning and philosophy behind Jewish prayer; explain the principals of the Shema; the blessings; the Shemona Esrei; Ashrei; and Aleinu; analyze underlying premises; integrate these concepts to all aspects of prayer; discuss why they pray; why God wants prayer; and how the set prayers achieve the prescribed goals.

Instruction:
Jewish Studies 320 DL (distance learning) course explores the philosophy and meaning of Jewish Prayer based on the systematic application of methodology provided in the masterpiece, The Way of God, by Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato, the commentary of the Malbim on Ashrei and the Abudraham on Aleinu; principles, customs, and meaning of Jewish Prayer. Topics include: unity; function of prayer; mankind's position in the creation; mankind's purpose; the function of evil; mankind's relationship and service to God. Instruction for the distance learning course is delivered through a series of forty audio lectures.
Credit recommendation:

Proficiency Exam: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation). Distance learning course: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Philosophy, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation).

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:
October 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply theoretical law; demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze underlying premises of the principle laws and customs; and apply them to novel situations.

Instruction:

The Jewish Studies 250 proficiency examination assesses students' ability to express knowledge about the fundamental Jewish laws and customs concerning blessings. Topics include: structure of a blessing; blessings made in vain; amen; discharging the obligation of others; initial blessings; sequence of blessings; principle versus subsidiary items; what is considered staples (mezonos); blessings on fruits and vegetables; wine, vegetable and fruit soups; and the general blessing of Shehakol.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation). NOTE: Students who complete the exam without the use of their notebooks could receive graduate credit.

Location:

Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations.

Length:

Varies; self study format. 

Dates:

March 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course (or proficiency examination), students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and in-depth knowledge of the role of Jewish women in medieval society in both Ashkenazic and Sephardic countries;  describe the typical woman’s social and economic status, as well as religious activity, and explain differences based on place of residence; explain the approach of various scholars in the field and the social causes they suggest to explain some of the practices and decrees which were made during this time period; and draw conclusions about how Jewish women in the Middle Ages viewed themselves and how others saw them.

Instruction:

This exam assesses students' knowledge of the role of the Jewish woman in Jewish society in the Middle Ages. Instructional topics focus on: economic standing and typical level of education, involvement in the community and religious practice, and reasons for various rabbinical ordinances decreed during this time period and their effects on women. The exam also covers major life events such as choosing a spouse, marriage, child rearing, and divorce as a way to understand how the status of women was affected by the way these things were handled in this time period and how social conditions, in turn, effected aspects of such events. The exam provides an overall broad picture of how Jewish women viewed themselves in the Middle Ages and how they were viewed by others. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Social Sciences, Behavioral Sciences, Judaic Studies, Women's Studies, or Social History (3/16).

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