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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Tor Academy- Psychology and Sociology

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies; self-study format

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: outline the history of Abnormal Psychology; identify the main symptoms of each psychological disorder mentioned; analyze the neurological, psychological and social factors contributing to each disorder; understand how a diagnosis of each disorder is made; recognize the context and culture behind psychological disorders; describe the modes of treatment available for psychological disorders; analyze the efficiency of various treatment options; familiarize yourself with essential terms and phrases which describe psychological disorders.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to research methods; principles of ethical research; setting up the research study; data collection techniques in psychology; non-experimental research; qualitative research methods and design; quasi-experimental research; sampling and generalization; measurement in research; internal validity in research; external validity; experimental design; descriptive statistics in psychology; inferential statistics in psychology; and evaluating research findings.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2021 - Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: identify and describe different types of drugs and the effects they cause; identify the different approaches of scientists and governments towards drugs; understand the role treatment and its different approaches; compare the effects of different drugs on the body and the brain; describe the ways in which research has affected society’s perspective to drugs; recognize the context and culture behind different drug usages; and familiarize yourself with essential terms and phrases within drugs, society and human behavior.

Instruction:

Major topics include: effects of drugs on society and how they affect human behavior, the development of drugs through history and the changing perception of society towards drugs, various types of drugs, their chemical compositions and their effects and uses, ethical issues in drug use and the various treatments which have been developed for prevention and cessation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format

Dates:
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: describe the different frameworks of effective teaching; discuss theories based on cognitive development.; articulate the process of moral development and identity formation; outline theories of intelligence and its relation to learning styles; recognize the importance of language diversity; analyze the components of a multicultural classroom; list and expand upon behavioral approaches to learning; explain the role of memory, knowledge, and emotions in learning; Illustrate how metacognition impacts students’ academic performance; detail the fields that are part of the learning sciences; differentiate between self-efficacy, self-concept, and self-regulation; recount the various aspects of motivation; create a practical classroom management plan; characterize the qualities that render a teacher effective; examine the pros and cons of various assessments and grading systems.

Instruction:

Major topics include: history and educational aims; cognitive perspective in psychology; behavioral perspective in psychology; developmental psychology in children and adolescents; motivation in learning; individual differences in children; assessments of learning; instructional pedagogy; and research design and analysis.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Education or General Education (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format

Dates:

March 2021 - Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: identify and describe different types of families and the challenges they face; identify the different approaches of family therapists and analyze their effectiveness; understand the role of the therapist in different therapeutic approaches; compare the different family therapy approaches; describe the ways in which research has affected the practice of family therapy; recognize the context and culture behind family therapy; and familiarize yourself with essential terms and phrases within family therapy. 

Instruction:

Major topics include: the family unit, development of the profession and the process of working with families, the nature of different types of families and the multiple theories associated with the practice of family therapy, ethical and legal issues in practice, and advantages and drawbacks of different approaches in family therapy.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format

Dates:

March 2021 - Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: Identify the cultural roots of psychology; examine the empirical and nonempirical approaches of Greek scholars; recount the role Christianity played in the history of psychology; detail the impact of the Italian Renaissance; compare and contrast empirical scientific psychology with philosophical models; recount the contributions of French academics; explain how knowledge is acquired according to the British; define mental activity within the context of the German school of thought; understand when and how psychology became an independent discipline; list the movements that established psychology’s intellectual foundations; differentiate between Functional psychology and Gestalt psychology; discuss how Behaviorism deviated from traditional views; understand the extent of psychology’s malleability; name and describe the various aspects of phenomenology and existential philosophy; and illustrate how psychology has evolved in Asian countries. 

Instruction:

Major topics include: studying the history of psychology; philosophical influences on psychology; physiological influences on psychology; women and ;minorities in psychology; the new psychology; structuralism in psychology; antecedent influences on functionalism; development of functionalism; applied psychology; antecedent influences on behaviorism; development of behaviorism; evolution of behaviorism; gestalt psychology; important theories in psychoanalysis; and contemporary developments in psychology.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: compare and contrast nature and nurture theories; discuss Freudian theories and terminologies; articulate attachment theories and attachment behaviors; describe the various stages of cognitive development; recognize the schools of thought that branch out from behaviorism; analyze the causes and outcomes of adolescent progression; differentiate between young adulthood and middle adulthood; explain the physical, social, and environmental aspects of disability; illustrate the role of systems theory in the study of familial relationships; List and expand upon the social factors that impact human development; detail the physical, cognitive, and social changes associated with aging; recount the impact of death on the individual and those around them.

Instruction:

Major topics include: various aspects of human development, including social, emotional, biological, and cognitive human growth; and stages of human development from adolescence up to late adulthood.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/21).

Length:

Varies; distance learning format. 

Dates:

March 2016- Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explore the subject matter of the field of psychology and discuss vocabulary and concepts of the field with some of the research findings upon which knowledge of human thought and behavior is based; develop critical thinking skills and be prepared to be a cautious and analytical consumer of information who is proclaimed to be scientific or to be based on research.After completion of exam, students will have a general knowledge of the major sub fields of psychology and attain a working understanding of some of the major theories in psychology and develop the critical thinking skills used in the field of psychology.

Instruction:

This self-study broadly covers the primary subject matter of the field emphasizing a familiarity with the vocabulary and concepts of psychology. The final exam focuses on the major subfields of and theories in psychology along with assessing students’ critical thinking skills and knowledge of basic subject matter including: research methodology, genes and the environment, the brain and the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning, social behavior, memory, emotion, development, and disorders.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, General Education, or Social Science (3/16) (8/21 revalidation).

Length:

Varies; self study format. 

Dates:

March 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and describe the concepts, terminology, and major figures in the field of sociology; detail the nature of the sociological inquiry, methods and perspectives; analyze the social behavior of people in other cultures; understand the process of socialization and how humans become social beings; examine various sides of controversial social issues; portray opposing positions on controversial social issues that affect the students’ own lives; analyze the different ways in which people act, feel, think and define their situations based on their sex, social class, age, ethnic group, geographical region, family or nationality; understand the issues of diversity and globalization and their impact on our lives.

Instruction:

Introduction to Sociology broadly covers the primary subject matter of the field emphasizing familiarity with the vocabulary and concepts of sociology. The course covers the major subfields of and theories in sociology along with assessing students’ critical thinking skills and knowledge of basic subject matter including: human culture, societies, the socialization process, the various types of stratification of class, gender, race and ethnicity, the concepts of minority groups, deviance and crime, gender, and age.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Social Science, or Behavioral Science (3/16) (8/21 revalidation).

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: identify the biological roots of physiological psychology; name and describe the various parts and functions of a neuron; list various parts of the brain and outline the development of the nervous system; Understand the role of a neuron’s role drugs are administered; discuss how surgery and chemical or electric stimulation provide information about behavior; recount how visual information is received and processed; differentiate between the somato-sensory pathways; categorize sleep disorders and the stages of REM sleep; examine the neural mechanisms and hormones responsible for gender-based behavior; illustrate how relevant parts of the brain control emotions; detail the physiological underpinnings of hunger and satiety; differentiate between the four types of learning; recount various developmental and degenerative disorders of the brain; and characterize the following disorders: schizophrenia, major affective disorder, sleep disorders, panic disorders, and obsessive compulsive-disorder.

Instruction:

Major topics include: structures and functions of the nervous system, psychopharmacology and research methods, the senses, movement, emotion, eating/digestion, learning, memory, and the neurology of psychological disorders.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: Articulate the socio-cultural influences on psychological research; Distinguish between quantitative and qualitative research; Examine the ethical concerns pertaining to research and testing; List the different types of observation and its accompanying problems; Discuss the instruments of research and its role in data interpretation; Name and define control techniques in psychological experiments; Explain why researchers would choose to use a repeated measures design; Understand why complex designs are critical to testing psychological theories; Detail the advantages and disadvantages of the case study method; Compare and contrast positive correlation with negative correlation; Recount when and how statistical tests are used; Write an effective research proposal.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to research methods; principles of ethical research; setting up the research study; data collection techniques in psychology; non- experimental research; qualitative research methods and design; quasi-experimental research; sampling and generalization; measurement in research; internal validity in research; external validity; experimental design; descriptive statistics in psychology; inferential statistics in psychology; and evaluating research findings.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/21).

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