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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies - Jewish Law

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Versions 1 and 2: Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: December 2011 - June 2022. Version 2: July 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to identify and explain Biblical and Rabbinic laws and customs pertaining to the Jewish Festivals; distinguish between Festival law and Sabbath law; and apply theoretical knowledge to practical scenarios. Version 2: Same as version 1 with additional outcomes: identify the evolution of Yom Tov customs from 1,000 BCE to the current times; display an understanding of lunar calendar anomalies which affect the Yom Tov schedules; identify customs and rituals unique to Rosh Hashana and Yom Kipur services; display competence in the practical application of Yom Tov Law.

Instruction:

Versions 1: The Jewish Festivals I (Jewish Law 230) includes an extensive study-guide and required reading with a final exam administered through The Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: cooking, ochel nefesh, mitoch, hoil, preparing for the following day, major forms of melacha, muktza, using appliances, treating illness, erev Yom Tov, candle lighting, meals, kiddush, havdalah, and eruvin. Version 2: Same as version 1 with additional topics and reading materials presenting multiple points of view and perspectives; study materials including pictorial and media have been added. The course delivery options include traditional/online presentation or self study/final exam.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religion, Near Eastern Studies, or Judaic Studies (3/12) (3/17 revalidation). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Religion, Near Eastern Studies, or Judaic Studies (7/22 revalidation). 

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: December 2011 - June 2022. Version 2: July 20 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and explain the significant aspects of the Jewish Festivals including their laws, customs, origins and symbolic nature; identify and explain rabbini and Torah sources for these festivals; convey the impact and meaning the festivals impart to the Jewish people; and apply theoretical knowledge to practical scenarios. Version 2: Same as version 1 with additional outcomes. Students will be able to: describe Yom Tov customs throughout the ages and Lunar calendar anomalies which affect the Yom Tov schedules: analyze customs surrounding the days in the calendar which commemorate both happy days and tragedies in Jewish history; and display mastery of the historical significance in past and current customs surrounding the 15th of Shevat. 

Instruction:

Version 1: The Jewish Festivals II (Jewish Law 230)  includes an extensive study-guide and required reading with a final exam administered through The Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: Rosh Chodesh, Rosh Hashana, public fast days, the ten days of repentences, Yom Kippur, Succos, Pesach, Shemini Atzeres, Simchas Torah, Chanuka, Tu B'Shevat, Shiva Asser B'Tammuz, and Tisha B'Av. Version 2: Same as version 1 with additional reading materials, topics and study guide resources. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religion, Near Eastern Studies, or Judaic Studies (3/12) (3/17 revalidation).  Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Religion, Near Eastern Studies, or Judaic Studies (7/22 revalidation). 

Length:

Varies; self-study format.  

Dates:

Version 1: December 2011 - Present. Version 2: July 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and explain Biblical and rabbinic laws, concepts and customs pertaining to Passover, seforas ha'omer and Shavuous including: the various categories of chometz and their status of permissibility before, during and after passover; checking and ridding a home of chometz, koshering procedures for the home, the Seder, Passover prayer format, counting the omer, and prohibitions during the omer period. Students also apply theoretical knowledge to practical scenarios. Version 2: Same as version 1 with additional outcomes: describe laws and customs concerning Chometz which was accidentally not destroyed before the Passover holiday; describe Lunar calendar anomalies which affect the Yom Tov schedules; conduct a thorough analysis of the Matzah baking process with an emphasis on the practical application and first hand knowledge of the Matzah baking process in contemporary times. 

Instruction:

Version 1: The Jewish Festivals III (Jewish Law 240) includes an extensive study-guide and required reading with a final exam administered through The Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: Biblical and Rabbinic restrictions and leniencies, prohbition of chometz, preparing for Passover, Passover prayer, the Seder, sefiras haomer and Shavuous. Version 2: Same as version 1 with additional reading materials, topics and study guide resources. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religion, Near Eastern Studies, or Judaic Studies (3/12) (3/17 revalidation). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Religion, Near Eastern Studies, or Judaic Studies (7/22 revalidation).

Length:

Varies; self-study format.  

Dates:
December 2011 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the categories of kosher and non-kosher foods in various categories and levels; distinguish between biblically proscribed non-kosher foods and foods prohibited by rabbinical decree; determine necessary rations for bitul; determine when/whether additions to mixtures changes the status of the mixture; determine when non-koshers tastes can be nullified; identify media that are capable of transferring tastes; identify heal levels required to transfer taste; define the theory of na"t bar na"t; and apply the practical ramifications of this rule.

Instruction:

The Laws of Kashrus I (Jewish Law 390) includes an extensive study-guide and required reading with a final exam administered through The Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include kosher versus non-kosher food and mixtures of kosher and non-kosher foods.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religion, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies (3/12) (3/17 revalidation) (7/22 revalidation).

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:
December 2011 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain and apply the rules of kashrus concerning the realm of milk and meat; explain the ramifications of the epic set of principles and its applications; distinguish between the three independent prohibitions; and assist in the maintenance of a kosher kitchen.

Instruction:

The Laws of Kashrus II (Jewish Law 395) i includes an extensive study-guide and required reading with a final exam administered through the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: major sources of the milk/meat prohibition, mixtures and interactions, customs and permutations of consumption, utensils, oven use, and kosher kitchen.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religion, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies (3/12) (3/17 revalidation) (7/22 revalidation).

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: October 2010 - February 2012. Version 2: March 2012 - June 2022. Version 3: July 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate an ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply theoretical Torah for the following categories: plowing, weeding, fertilizing, planting, watering, weeding, fumigating, covering plants, reaping, uprooting, scraping, using trees, gathering, methods of gathering, gathering to discard, natural growth and natural stones; identify the distinction between similar prohibitions and their causes; discuss the underlying principles; determine when leniencies apply; describe their impact on Shabbos behavior; and apply principles to practical scenarios. Version 2: Students will be able to: identify and explain the underlying principles of theoretical Torah law relating to agriculture/baking break, such as: plowing, weeding, fertilizing, planting, watering, weeding, fumigating, covering plants, reaping, uprooting, scraping, using trees, gathering, methods of gathering, gathering to discard, natural growth winnowing, threshing, sorting, grinding, sifting, kneading, and baking; describe the impact of these laws on Sabbath behavior; and apply these laws to practical scenarios. Version 3: All outcomes presented in versions 1 and 2 with additional outcomes: understand the agricultural laws concerning the forbidden activities; conduct and in-depth analysis of the connection between Shabbos and the Shmittah year; describe the spiritual significance of the day of rest and its meaning in Jewish law, thought and history; analyze the activity of Borer and its far-reaching implications. 

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: The Laws of the Sabbath: The Order of Baking Bread (Jewish Law 320) includes an extensive study-guide and required reading with a final exam administered through the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Version 3: Reading materials and additional sources representing multiple points of views and perspectives were added; study materials were expanded. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Religion, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (3/12) (3/17 revalidation). Version 3: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Religion, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (7/22 revalidation). 

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: December 2011 - June 2022. Version 2: July 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the underlying principles of the laws and customs concerning the Sabbath; describe their impact on Sabbath behavior; and apply the principles to practical situations. Version 2: Same as version 1 with added outcomes: describe relevant laws of constructions: conduct an in depth analysis of the connection between construction performed in the Tabernacle and modern day construction; explain the spiritual significance of the day of rest and its meaning in Jewish law, thought and history; and analyze the activity of Makeh B'patish and its implications. 

Instruction:

Version 1: The Laws of the Sabbath: The Order of Construction (Jewish Law 340) includes an extensive study-guide and required readings with a final exam administered through the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: writing, erasing, building, demolishing, the final hammer blow, kindling a fire, using electricity, extinguishing a fire, and transferring objects. Version 2: Same topics as version 1 including additional reading materials representing multiple perspectives. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (3/12) (3/17 revalidation). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (7/22 revalidation). 

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: December 2011 - June 2022. Version 2: July 2022 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the underlying principles of the laws and customs concerning the Sabbath; describe their impact on Sabbath behavior; and apply the principles to practical situations. Version 2: Same as version 1 with expanded outcomes: discuss activities involved in the production of textiles as they relate to laws concerning the forbidden activities on the Shabbos; analysis the connection between Shabbos and the Shmittah year; relate the spiritual significance of the day of rest and its meaning in Jewish law, thought and history; and conduct an in depth analysis of the activity of Borer and its implications. 

Instruction:

Version 1: The Laws of the Sabbath: The Order of Garments (Jewish Law 330) includes an extensive study-guide and required readings with a final exam administered through the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: shearing, washing, combing, dyeing, tying, sewing, tearing, trapping, slaughtering, skinning, tanning, salting smoothing, scoring, and cutting. Version 2: Reading materials presenting multiple perspectives from various sources were added; and study materials were expanded. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (3/12) (3/17 revalidation). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (7/22 revalidation). 

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:
November 2011 - Present.
Objectives:

Students will be able to: identify and explain fundamental philosophy behind the prohibition of working Sabbath; identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply theoretical law in the following areas: desisting from weekday activities and occupations, avoiding preparations for after Sabbath with the allowance for positive commandments, speaking about work, excessive exertion, doing work on the eve of the Sabbath, non-movable objects (muktza) due to value, forbidden use, non-designation for use; asking a non-Jew to perform work (amira l"akum) including the causes of prohibitions and allowances for the criteria by which they are determined; identify the distinction between different prohibitions and their causes, discuss underlying principles; determine when leniencies apply; describe their impact on the Sabbath behavior; and apply principles to practical scenarios. In regards to the time frame of the Sabbath, students will able to: discuss the laws pertaining to candle lighting at the commencement of Sabbath; identify who may light and where one may light a candle; apply theory to practice; solve problematic scenarios regarding candle lighting; demonstrate knowledge regarding laws and customs related to the conclusion of Sabbath and the custom of Havdallah. Students will also be able to identify the distinction between similar prohibitions and their causes; discuss the underlying principles and determine when leniencies apply; describe their impact on Sabbath behavior; and apply the principles to practical scenarios.

Instruction:

Jewish Law 350 includes an extensive study-guide and required reading with a final exam administered through the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in History, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/11) (3/16 revalidation) (8/21 revalidation). NOTE: This course was previously offered as two discrete courses: The Laws of the Sabbath: Advanced Topics (Jewish Law 250) and The Laws of the Sabbath: Time Frame and Rabbinical Institutions (Jewish Law 310). Please refer to the exhibits for The Laws of the Sabbath: Advanced Topics (Jewish Law 250) and The Laws of the Sabbath: Time Frame and Rabbinical Institutions (Jewish Law 310). 

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