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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies - Bible

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: October 2010 - February 2016. Version 2: March 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze key concepts and themes found in the book of Deuteronomy and its classic medieval and modern commentaries; expand on Talmudic and Midrashic exegesis of the text of the Bible; solve apparent contradictions in and between verses; explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insights; interpret the ethical issues being discussed; explain lawful rulings derived from the verses as determined in the major law books; understand commentaries from the last generation of Torah Scholars that are included in the anthology.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Advanced Deutronomy (Bible 350) is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: the purpose of repeating the Torah; the mission of the spies; Moses' prayer to enter the land; the Ten Commandments; Shema; Moses' blessing and admonition; and other topics.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (3/16 revalidation). 

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:
October 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze key concepts and themes found in the book of Exodus and its classic medieval and modern commentaries; expand on Talmudic and Midrashic exegesis of the text of the Bible; solve apparent contradictions in and between verses; explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insights; interpret the ethical issues being discussed; explain lawful rulings derived from the verses as determined in the major law books; and understand significant commentaries from the last generation of Torah Scholars that are included in the anthology.

Instruction:

Advanced Exodus (Bible 320) is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: the exile; Egyptian subjugation; the rise of Moses to leadership; the ten plagues; splitting of the sea; receiving of the Torah; and building of the Tabernacle.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation). 

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:
October 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze key concepts and themes found in the book of Genesis and its classic medieval and modern commentaries; expand on Talmudic and Midrashic exegesis of the text of the Bible; solve apparent contradictions in and between verses; explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insights; interpret the ethical issues being discussed; explain lawful rulings derived from the verses as determined in the major law books; and understand commentaries from the last generation of Torah Scholars that are included in the anthology.

Instruction:

Advanced Genesis (Bible 370) is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: the purpose of Creation; the exile from Eden; the generation until the recognition of Abraham; the ten trials; binding of Isaac; sibling rivalry; and the beginning of exile.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation).

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: October 2010 - February 2016. Version 2: March 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze key concepts and themes found in the book of Leviticus and its classic medieval and modern commentaries; expand on Talmudic and Midrashic exegesis of the text of the Bible; solve apparent contradictions in and between verses; explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insights; interpret the ethical issues being discussed; explain lawful rulings derived from the verses as determined in the major law books; understand commentaries from the last generation of Torah Scholars that are included in the anthology.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Advanced Leviticus (Bible 330) is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: sacrifices; holiness; service of the priests; priestly blessings; kosher and non-kosher food; spiritual contamination; childbirth; leprosy; and other topics.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (3/16 revalidation). 

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: October 2010 - February 2016. Version 2: March 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze key concepts and themes found in the book of Numbers and its classic medieval and modern commentaries; expand on Talmudic and Midrashic exegesis of the text of the Bible; solve apparent contradictions in and between verses; explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insights; interpret the ethical issues being discussed; explain lawful rulings derived from the verses as determined in the major law books; and understand commentaries from the last generation of Torah Scholars that are included in the anthology.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Advanced Numbers (Bible 340) is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. Topics include: the censuses; formation of encampments; sacrifices; nazarism; inheritance; priestly blessings; the spies; rebellions; red cow; Aaron's death and other topics.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/11). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (3/16 revalidation). 

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

Version 1: May 2013 - May 2018. Version 2: June 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the text and commentary of Rashi; analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi's commentary; elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics; identify where Rashi saw his interpretation imbedded in the text; explain the significance of Rashi's solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior; and assess how a particular section of the Torah, along with Rashi's commentary, fit into greater contextual themes found throughout the Chumash.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Comprehensive Exodus (Bible 225) is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. NOTE: This may not be taken with Introduction to Exodus (Bible 220).

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (6/13). Version 2:  In the upper division baccalaureate  degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (6/18 revalidation). 

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

Version 1: May 2013 -  ay 2018. Version 2: June 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the text and commentary of Rashi; analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi's commentary; elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics; identify where Rashi saw his interpretation imbedded in the text; explain the significance of Rashi's solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior; and assess how a particular section of the Torah, along with Rashi's commentary, fit into greater contextual themes found throughout the Chumash.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Bible 215 is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. NOTE: This may not be taken with Introduction to Genesis (Bible 210).

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (6/13). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (6/18 revalidation). 

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

Version 1: May 2013 -  May 2018. Version 2: June 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the text and commentary of Rashi; analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi's commentary; elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics; identify where Rashi saw his interpretation imbedded in the text; explain the significance of Rashi's solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior; and assess how a particular section of the Torah, along with Rashi's commentary, fit into greater contextual themes found throughout the Chumash.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Bible 235 is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. NOTE: This may not be taken with Introduction to Leviticus (Bible 230).

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (6/13). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (6/18 revalidation). 

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

May 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and themes found in the Book of Genesis and its classic medieval and modern commentaries including Rashi, Ramban, Sforno, Ohr Hachaim, Cli Yakar, and Siphtei Chachamim; assess how particular sections of the Torah and its commentary fit into the greater context of the Chumash and how they relate to broader themes found throughout the Torah; expand on exegesis of the text of the Bible; solve apparent contradictions in and between verses; explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insights; interpret the ethical issues being discussed; explain lawful rulings derived from the verses as determined in the major law books; and read and understand commentaries from the last generation of Torah scholars who are included in the anthology of the commentary.

Instruction:

Bible 355 is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. NOTE: This may not be taken with Advanced Deuteronomy (Bible 350).

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (6/13) (6/18 revalidation).

Location:
Jerusalem, Israel and other approved locations in the United States
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:
May 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

UIpon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and themes found in the Book of Genesis and its classic medieval and modern commentaries including Rashi, Ramban, Sforno, Ohr Hachaim, Cli Yakar, and Siphtei Chachamim; assess how particular sections of the Torah and its commentary fit into the greater context of the Chumash and how they relate to broader themes found throughout the Torah; expand on exegesis of the text of the Bible; solve apparent contradictions in and between verses; explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insights; interpret the ethical issues being discussed; explain lawful rulings derived from the verses as determined in the major law books; and read and understand commentaries from the last generation of Torah scholars who are included in the anthology of the commentary.

Instruction:
Bible 325 is offered as an on-line proficiency examination with an extensive study guide and required reading administered by the Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies. NOTE: This may not be taken with Advanced Exodus (Bible 320).
Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (6/13) (6/18 revalidation). 

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