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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Environmental - LIUNA Training and Education Fund

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

40 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the following trade related terms and acronyms: ACM, EPA, asbestos fiber, friable and non-friable asbestos-containing material, micron, OSHA, PACM, PEL, SM, TSI; list the six types of asbestos as identified by OSHA; list the two most common types of asbestos used in construction; explain the difference between friable and non-friable asbestos-containing materials; correctly state and explain the function of the OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL) for asbestos; describe each of the four classes of asbestos work activity specified by OSHA; define the following terms: carcinogen, ingestion, inhalation, latency period, routes of entry, synergism; identify the two major routes of entry for asbestos into the body; explain the relationship between smoking and exposure to asbestos; list three diseases linked to occupational asbestos exposure and describe the symptoms of each disease; name the body organs affected by asbestos exposure and explain how asbestos affects each; list three protective mechanisms the body uses to get rid of asbestos fibers, and explain how these mechanisms work; define the following acronyms: FEV1, FVC, NIOSH, PFT; list the three reasons for establishing a medical monitoring and surveillance program; list the five required elements of an initial/preplacement medical examination for asbestos abatement workers; list the five required elements of an annual medical examination for asbestos abatement workers; list two additional recommended medical tests for asbestos abatement workers; state the number of years an employer must keep the medical records for each employee; list 10 legal rights workers have under the Occupational Safety and Health Act; list the seven responsibilities workers have under the Occupational Safety and Health Act; list seven steps workers should follow if they are punished for exercising any OSHA legal right; explain the purpose of the following EPA standards: NESHAP, AHERA, ASHARA; describe the following three air-purifying respirators (APR) used by asbestos abatement workers, and state the assigned protection factor (APF) for each: half-face APR, full-face APR, and powered APR; list and explain at least six limitations of APRs; list and describe the three filter series and three filter efficiency levels for particulate filters; explain the terms breakthrough and warning properties, and list four steps that should be taken if breakthrough occurs; explain the term assigned protection factor (APF) for a respirator; explain the acronym MUC as it relates to a respirator, and calculate the correct MUC for half-face, full-face, and powered air purifying respirators; explain the difference between an air-purifying respirator and an atmosphere-supplying respirator; explain the difference between continuous flow and pressure-demand regulators; state the correct APF for a continuous flow Type C airline; state the correct APF for a positive-pressure, pressure demand airline; given the proper personal protective equipment, correctly dress out for entry into an asbestos work area (containment); demonstrate the correct way to don a negative pressure respirator and perform a positive and negative user seal check; demonstrate the correct way to doff personal protective equipment in a three-stage decontamination unit; list and explain the nine requirements of a respiratory protection program; explain the difference between a qualitative and a quantitative fit test and give an example of each; define the following terms and acronyms: accident, confined space, engineering controls, GFCI, hazardous atmospheres, LFL, UFL, oxygen deficiency, lock out and tag out, personal fall arrest system, heat stress, personal hygiene; describe the different levels of heat stress and the dangers they pose to workers; given a variety of job site scenarios, demonstrate safe work practices around the following hazards: electrical, ladders, scaffolds, housekeeping, falls, confined spaces, hazardous atmospheres; describe the fire hazards that exist in a controlled area and how to prepare for the occurrence of an accidental fire; define the following terms and acronyms: clean room, equipment room, HVAC, shower room, waste load-out area; list and explain four reasons for preplanning asbestos abatement operations; list the 12 steps in preparing the work area; define the purpose of decontamination on an asbestos abatement project; list the elements of the decontamination chamber and explain the function of each; explain the purpose and function of a negative pressure air unit; given scenarios of spaces, calculate the number of machines needed to meet air change requirements; given the proper materials and equipment, demonstrate how to prepare the work area, set up the required number of negative air machines and set up a three-chamber decontamination unit according to course guidelines; define the following terms and acronyms: amended water, encapsulation, enclosure, glove bag, HEPA vacuum, NESHAP; describe the difference between bridging and penetrating sealants; list three advantages and seven disadvantages of encapsulation; list three advantages and seven disadvantages of enclosure; list 10 tools commonly used with a glove bag; describe the two stages of asbestos cleanup; list the 19 steps of the final cleanup; define the following terms and acronyms: aggressive sampling, air sampling, breathing zone, bulk sampling, PCM, personal sampling, PLM, static sampling, TEM; explain how and why air sampling is done on an asbestos abatement project; list the two analytical methods used in final clearance of asbestos abatement projects; explain the difference between static sampling and aggressive sampling; describe bulk sampling, settled dust sampling, and wipe sampling methods; list and describe the limitations of three analytical methods used in asbestos abatement; explain the purpose for taking area samples from outside the work are (but inside the building) and from outside the building; define the following terms and acronyms: ACBM, AHERA, bonding, contract, insurance, and tort liability; describe a good faith survey; describe a pre-bid walk through; list three types of bonds that are commonly issued in construction; list the three types of insurance that owners, consultants and contractors should have; list four types of contracts under which asbestos abatement projects are performed; identify three personnel roles on a large asbestos abatement project; explain the purpose of project plans, specifications, and contracts; give at least four examples of how they impact project planning; define the following terms and explain their purpose on an asbestos abatement project: production schedule, equipment schedule, bar chart; describe the role the supervisor plays in effecting safety, quality, and production on an asbestos abatement project; describe the supervisor’s role in fostering a working relationship with the union; list four things that should be planned for when setting up the job site; identify the five key points of communication; identify the three rules of dealing with interpersonal conflict; and list the behavior patterns that can be considered to be forms of sexual harassment.

Instruction:

Major topics include: work area preparation, decontamination facility construction and use, abatement techniques, and cleanup procedures. The course builds upon information provided in the Asbestos Abatement Worker course and prepares CCLs to supervise asbestos abatement projects. Participants receive extensive instruction and hands-on training in many subjects. Special emphasis is placed on following proper procedures and developing safe work habits. The course meets all OSHA requirements for supervisor level training and is mandatory for all persons who will supervise workers involved in Class I, and Class II asbestos abatement work. The course exceeds EPA’s 32-hour minimum course requirements stipulated under 40 CFR Part 763.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Industrial Safety (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

40 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the following trade related terms and acronyms: ACM, EPA, asbestos fiber, friable asbestos-containing material, micron, non-friable asbestos-containing material, OSHA, PACM, PEL, SM, and TSI; list the six types of asbestos as defined by OSHA; list the two most common types of asbestos used in construction; explain the difference between friable and non-friable asbestos-containing materials; state the OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL) for asbestos; describe a Class I asbestos work activity; describe a Class II asbestos work activity; describe a Class III asbestos work activity; describe a Class IV asbestos work activity; define the following terms: carcinogen, ingestion, inhalation, latency period, routes of entry, and synergism; identify the two major routes of entry for asbestos into the body; explain the relationship between smoking and exposure to asbestos; list three diseases linked to occupational asbestos exposure and describe the symptoms of each disease; name the body organs affected by asbestos exposures and explain how asbestos affects each one; list three protective mechanisms the body uses to get rid of asbestos fibers, and explain how these mechanisms work; define the following acronyms FEV1, FVC, NIOSH, and PFT; list the three reasons for establishing a medical monitoring and surveillance program; list the five required elements of an initial/preplacement examination for asbestos abatement workers, the five required elements of an annual examination, and two additional recommended tests; list the five required elements of an initial/preplacement examination for asbestos abatement workers, the five required elements of an annual examination, and two additional recommended tests; list 10 legal rights workers have under the Occupational Safety Act of 1970; list the seven responsibilities workers have under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970; list seven steps workers should follow if they are punished for exercising any OSHA legal right; explain the purpose of the following: EPA standards, NESHAP, AHERA, and ASHARA; describe the following three air-purifying respirators and list the assigned protection factor (APF) for each: Half-Face Air Purifying Respirator (Half-Face APR), Full-Face, Air Purifying Respirator (FFAPR), and Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR); list and explain at least six limitations of APRs; list and explain the three filter series and three filter efficiency levels for particulate filters; explain the terms breakthrough and warning properties, and list four steps that should be taken if breakthrough occurs; explain the term assigned protection factor (APF) for a respirator and, given the five different respirators, state the correct APF in four of the five examples; explain the differences between an air-purifying respirator and an atmosphere-supplying respirator; explain the abbreviation MUC as it relates to a respirator, and calculate the correct MUC for at least four out of five sample respirators; explain the differences between the three delivery systems for breathing air: continuous flow, demand, and pressure demand; explain how a supplied airline respirator (SAR) works; list three limitations of the SAR and the APFs for both the SAR and the SAR with escape; explain how an open-circuit pressure demand SCBA works, its limitations, and APF; given the proper equipment, demonstrate the proper procedures for refilling an SCBA cylinder; list and explain the nine requirements of a Respiratory Protection Program; explain the difference between a qualitative and a quantitative fit test and give two examples of each; demonstrate and explain the proper procedure for performing a positive and negative user seal check on an APR; using a variety of respirators, demonstrate how to put on, use, take off, and maintain each respirator according to the guidelines of this course; define the following acronyms and terms: accident, confined space, engineering controls, GFCI, hazardous atmospheres, LFL, UFL, oxygen deficiency, lock out and tag out, personal fall arrest system, heat stress, and personal hygiene; understand the different levels of heat stress and the dangers they pose to workers; gven a variety of job site scenarios, demonstrate safe work practices around the following hazards: electrical, ladders, scaffolds, housekeeping, falls, confined spaces, and hazardous atmospheres; understand what fire hazards exist in a controlled area and how to prepare for the occurrence of an accidental fire; define the following acronym and terms: clean room, equipment room, HVAC, shower room, and waste load-out area; list and explain four reasons for preplanning asbestos abatement operations; list the 12 steps in preparing the work area; define the purpose of decontamination on an asbestos abatement project; list the elements of the decontamination chamber and explain the function of each; explain the purpose and function of a negative pressure air unit; using several example spaces, calculate the number of machines needed to meet air change requirements; given the proper materials and equipment, prepare the work area, set up the required number of negative air machines, and set up a three-chamber decontamination unit according to the guidelines in this chapter; define the following: amended water, encapsulation, enclosure, glove bag, HEPA vacuum, and NESHAP; describe the difference between bridging and penetrating sealants; list three advantages and seven disadvantages of encapsulation; list three advantages and seven disadvantages of enclosure; list 10 tools commonly used with a glove bag; describe the two stages of asbestos abatement; list the 19 steps of the final cleanup; define the following terms and acronyms: aggressive sampling, area sampling, breathing zone, bulk sampling, PCM, personal sampling, PLM, static sampling, and TEM; explain how and why air sampling is done on an asbestos abatement project; list the two analytical methods used in final clearance of asbestos abatement projects; explain the difference between static sampling and aggressive sampling; describe bulk sampling, settled dust sampling, and wipe sampling methods; list and briefly describe the limitations of three analytical methods used in asbestos abatement; and explain the purpose for taking area samples from outside the work area (but inside the building) and from outside the building.

Instruction:

Major topics include:  work area preparation, decontamination facility construction and use, abatement techniques, and cleanup procedures. Special emphasis is placed on following proper procedures and developing safe work habits. The course meets all OSHA requirements and is mandatory for all workers involved in Class I and Class II asbestos abatement work. The course exceeds EPA’s 32-hour minimum course requirements, as stipulated under 40 CFR Part 763.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Industrial Technology (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

80 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list and explain the three general hazard categories on a hazardous waste site, and how to recognize them; describe and give examples of the following four types of chemical hazards: toxic, corrosive, carcinogen, and reactive; illustrate the fire triangle and explain its elements; illustrate the pH scale and explain how corrosive strength is measured; illustrate the flammable/explosive range and explain the importance of lower explosive limit (LEL) and upper explosive limit (UEL); explain oxygen deficiency and describe the two ways it can be caused; list, explain, and give examples of the physical states in which chemicals are commonly found; describe the two types of radiation, explain their differences, and give examples of both; list and describe three biological hazards that can be found on hazardous waste sites; explain how safety meetings contribute to safety on a hazardous waste site; define engineering controls and give four examples of engineering controls that might be used on a hazardous waste site; list, explain, and give examples of the two main approaches used to reduce or prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses on hazardous waste sites; list and explain the three routes of entry for chemicals into the body; explain the difference between a local health effect and a systemic health effect and give three examples of each; explain the difference between a prompt health effect and a delayed health effect and give three examples of each; list and explain the respiratory system’s three natural defenses; list the six physical warning signs of chemical exposure; demonstrate how to properly self-monitor for heat stress and evaluate the results; describe at least two conditions that indicate occupational noise has reached a hazardous level; describe at least two signs or symptoms of temporary hearing loss; given the PPE, demonstrate how to properly wear and/or insert hearing protection; list the steps for and be able to demonstrate the proper lifting procedure; explain “oxygen deficiency” and describe the two main causes for its occurrence; list four main body systems and explain how chemical and physical hazards may affect them; list and describe the signs and symptoms of the four stages of heat stress; explain the liver’s role in the body’s defense system; describe the following three air-purifying respirators and list the assigned protection factor APF for each: ½ Face APR, FFAPR, and PAPR; list and explain at least six limitations of APRs; list and explain the three filter series and three filter efficiency levels for particulate filters; explain the terms “breakthrough” and “warning properties” and list four steps that should be taken if breakthrough occurs; explain the term assigned protection factor (APF) for a respirator and, given five different respirators, state the correct APF of the five examples; explain the abbreviation “MUC” for a respirator and, given five different respirators, calculate the correct MUC in the five different respirators; explain the differences between an air-purifying respirator and an atmosphere supplying respirator; explain the differences between the three delivery systems for breathing air: continuous flow, demand, and pressure demand; explain how a supplied air respirator (SAR) works; list three limitations of the SAR and the APFs for both the SAR and the SAR with escape; explain how an SCBA works, its limitations, and APF; given the proper equipment, demonstrate the proper procedures for refilling an SCBA cylinder (hands-on); list and explain the nine requirements of a respiratory protection program; explain the difference between a qualitative and a quantitative fit test, and give two examples of each; demonstrate and explain the proper procedure for performing a positive and negative user seal check on an APR; given a variety of respirators, demonstrate donning, use, doffing, and maintenance of each respirator according to the guidelines of this course (hands-on); list and explain the three different types of leakage that can occur with chemical protective clothing; list and explain five factors that can affect your work-mission duration on an environmental project; describe the four “levels of protection” that may be used when doing hazardous waste work; given a variety of protective clothing and specific instructions for donning and doffing of various work ensembles, demonstrate the correct procedures according to the guidelines of this course (hands-on); explain the purpose of decontamination on hazardous waste sites and list three pathways of exposure; explain the terms “contamination avoidance” and “contamination transfer” and list three safe work procedures associated with each; describe the difference between physical removal and chemical removal as methods of decontamination; given three emergency scenarios, describe when decontamination should take place and a possible decontamination procedure for each scenario; given mock scenarios, perform decontamination appropriately, according to the guidelines of this chapter; list and explain the 10 topics of information that are required in a Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP); describe five scenarios on a hazardous waste site where additional site-specific training is required; list and explain five different elements of a site control program; explain the purpose of the “buddy system” and describe three activities that “buddies” perform on a hazardous waste site; list and explain the two types of communication systems that must be used on hazardous waste sites; list four examples of waste-related emergencies and four examples of non-waste related emergencies; explain the importance of training and drills in an emergency response plan; explain the importance of standard operating procedures (SOP) and why they need to be followed on hazardous waste sites; given a mock unidentified hazardous materials container, list and identify the “clues” to look for when performing a preliminary visual inspection; describe different sampling techniques used to identify hazardous materials; describe the appropriate response and handling procedures for the following site-specific hazards: radioactive materials, explosive or shock-sensitive waste, bulging drums, laboratory packs, leaking, open, or deteriorated drums, and buried drums; given an empty overpack drum and a mock damaged drum, demonstrate three methods of manually overpacking the drum; define the term “characterization” and explain how and why it is done on a hazardous waste site; given the proper equipment, containers, and personal protective equipment (PPE), explain and demonstrate methods for collecting bulk samples on a mock hazardous waste site using the following devices: auger and thin-walled tube sampler and drum thief and COLIWASA; list and explain the three safe work practices that should be used when storing hazardous materials; given the proper materials, equipment, and several mock hazardous waste containers, construct and organize a contained staging area according to the guidelines in this course; explain and compare the differences, advantages, and disadvantages of direct-reading instruments (DRIs) versus laboratory analysis of workplace samples; describe five situations on a hazardous waste site where workplace monitoring would usually be required; given the proper equipment, conduct the required workspace monitoring for a mock (practice) permit-required confined space entry; using various sample chemicals and the proper equipment, demonstrate how to use and interpret the readings of colorimetric detector tubes and a photoionization detector (PID); list and explain the appropriate responses if a personal monitoring device or sampling pump fails; define a confined space, giving three characteristics; list two categories of confined spaces and give examples of each; list two factors that lead to fatal injuries in confined spaces; describe the four characteristics of a permit-required confined space; locate the titles of the 17 paragraphs of the OSHA Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard and describe the contents of each paragraph; explain the employee responsibilities contained in the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act); describe the 11 rights an employee has under Section 11(c) of the OSH Act; describe three conditions found in 29 CFR 1977.12 that must be present for OSHA’s “right to refuse hazardous work” to apply; describe the purpose of the following environmental laws: RCRA, CERCLA, SARA, Clean Air Act, NESHAPS, Clean Water Act, and Hazardous Material Transportation Act; explain CERCLA and what the Superfund Act did for the nation; explain SARA and the changes it made; list and explain the nine steps of the Superfund process and the corresponding guidelines for community relations at each step; explain the worker’s role in the community relations process; list and explain the guidelines that should be followed when answering questions or discussing hazardous waste site operations; explain the meaning of the term “groundwater” and describe its importance; list and explain the four phases of the hydrologic cycle; explain the meaning of and the differences between “point sources” and “nonpoint sources” of contamination; given the proper equipment and working with a partner, prepare a flip chart diagram of a selected remediation technology and deliver a 5-minute classroom presentation about this technology.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are the safe and productive ways of working on hazardous waste remediation sites. Special emphasis is placed on following procedures and developing safe work habits.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Construction Technology (4/16). 

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

40 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list and explain the three general hazard categories on a hazardous waste site, and how to recognize them; describe and give examples of these four types of chemical hazards: toxic, corrosive, carcinogen, and reactive; illustrate the fire triangle and tetrahedron and explain their elements; illustrate the pH scale and explain how corrosive strength is measured; illustrate the flammable/explosive range and explain the importance of lower explosive limit (LEL) and upper explosive limit (UEL); explain oxygen deficiency and describe the two ways it can be caused; list, explain, and give examples of the physical states in which chemicals are commonly found; identify the two types of radiation, explain their differences, and give examples of both; list and describe three biological hazards that can be found on hazardous waste sites; explain how safety meetings contribute to safety on a hazardous waste site; define engineering controls and give four examples of engineering controls that might be used on a hazardous waste site; list, explain, and give examples of the two main approaches used to reduce or prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses on hazardous waste sites; list and explain the three routes of entry for chemicals into the body; explain the difference between a local health effect and a systemic health effect and give an example of each; explain the difference between a prompt health effect and a delayed health effect and give three examples of each; list the six physical warning signs of chemical exposure; list and describe the signs and symptoms of the four stages of heat stress; explain the liver’s role in the body’s defense system; describe the following three air-purifying respirators and list the assigned protection factor APF for each: ½ Face APR, FFAPR, and PAPR; list and explain at least six limitations of APRs; list and explain the three filter series and three filter efficiency levels for particulate filters; explain the terms “breakthrough” and “warning properties” and list four steps that should be taken if breakthrough occurs; explain the term assigned protection factor (APF) for a respirator; explain the abbreviation “MUC” for a respirator and, given five different respirators, calculate the correct MUC in the five different respirators; explain the differences between an air-purifying respirator and an atmosphere supplying respirator; explain the differences between continuous flow, demand, and pressure demand; explain how a SAR works; list three limitations of the SAR and the APFs for both the SAR and the SAR with escape; explain how an SCBA works, its limitations, and APF; list and explain the nine requirements of a respiratory protection program; explain the difference between a qualitative and a quantitative fit test; demonstrate and explain the proper procedure for performing a user seal check on an APR; list and explain the three different types of leakage that can occur with chemical protective clothing; describe the four “levels of protection” that may be used when doing hazardous waste work; given a variety of protective clothing and specific instructions for donning and doffing of various work ensembles, demonstrate the correct procedures according to the guidelines of this course; explain the purpose of decontamination on hazardous waste sites and list three pathways of exposure; explain the terms contamination avoidance and contamination transfer and list three safe work procedures associated with each; describe the difference between physical removal and chemical removal as methods of decontamination; given three emergency scenarios, describe when decontamination should take place and a possible decontamination procedure for each scenario; given mock scenarios, perform decontamination appropriately, according to the guidelines of this course; list and explain the 10 topics of information that are required in a Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP); describe five scenarios on a hazardous waste site where additional site-specific training is required; list and explain five different elements of a site control program; explain the purpose of the “buddy system” and describe three activities that “buddies” perform on a hazardous waste site; list and explain the two types of communication systems that must be used on hazardous waste sites; list four examples of waste-related emergencies and four examples of non-waste related emergencies; explain the importance of training and drills in an emergency response plan; explain the importance of standard operating procedures (SOP) and why they need to be followed on hazardous waste sites; list and identify the “clues” to look for when performing a preliminary visual inspection of containers; list two sampling techniques used to identify hazardous materials; describe the appropriate response and handling procedures for the following site-specific hazards: radioactive materials, explosive or shock-sensitive waste, bulging drums, laboratory packs, leaking, open, or deteriorated drums, and buried drums; define the term “characterization” and explain how and why it is done; list and explain the three safe work practices that should be used when storing hazardous materials; explain and compare the differences, advantages, and disadvantages of direct-reading instruments (DRIs) vs. laboratory analysis of workplace samples; describe five situations on a hazardous waste site where workplace monitoring would usually be required; using various sample chemicals, demonstrate how to use and interpret the readings of a colorimetric tube and a multigas meter; list and explain the appropriate responses if a personal monitoring device or sampling pump fails; define a confined space, giving three characteristics; list two categories of confined spaces and give examples of each; list two factors that lead to fatal injuries in confined spaces; describe the four characteristics of a permit-required confined space; locate the titles of the 17 paragraphs of the OSHA Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard (HAZWOPER, 29CFR 1910.120) and describe the contents of each paragraph; explain the employee responsibilities contained in the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act); describe the 11 rights an employee has under Section 11(c) of the OSH Act; describe three conditions found in 29 CFR 1977.12 that must be present for OSHA’s “right to refuse hazardous work” to apply; explain CERCLA and what the Superfund Act did for the nation; explain SARA and the changes that it made; explain the worker’s role in the community relations process; list and explain the guidelines that should be followed when answering questions or discussing hazardous waste site operations.

Instruction:

Major topics include safe and productive ways of working on hazardous waste remediation sites. Special emphasis is placed on following procedures and developing safe work habits.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Construction Technology (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

24 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list and explain the three general hazard categories on a hazardous waste site, and how to recognize them; describe and give examples of the following four types of chemical hazards: toxic, corrosive, carcinogen, and reactive; illustrate the fire triangle and explain its elements; illustrate the pH scale and explain how corrosive strength is measured; illustrate the flammable/explosive range and explain the importance of lower explosive limit (LEL) and upper explosive limit (UEL); explain oxygen deficiency and describe the two ways it can be caused; list, explain, and give examples of the physical states in which chemicals are commonly found; describe the two types of radiation, explain their differences, and give examples of both; list and describe three biological hazards that can be found on hazardous waste sites; explain how Safety Meetings contribute to safety on a hazardous waste site; define engineering controls and give four examples of engineering controls that might be used on a hazardous waste site; list, explain, and give examples of the two main approaches used to reduce or prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses on hazardous waste sites; list and explain the three routes of entry for chemicals into the body; explain the difference between a local health effect and a systemic health, and give three examples of each; explain the difference between a prompt health effect and a delayed health effect, and give three examples of each; list and explain the respiratory system’s three natural defenses; list the six physical warning signs of chemical exposure; explain oxygen deficiency and describe the two main causes for its occurrences; list the steps of the proper lifting procedure; list and describe the signs and symptoms of the four stages of heat stress; explain the purpose of decontamination on hazardous waste sites and list three pathways of exposure; explain the terms “contamination avoidance” and “contamination transfer” and list three safe work procedures associated with each; describe the difference between physical removal and chemical removal as methods of decontamination; list and explain the 10 topics of information that are required in a Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP); describe five scenarios on a hazardous waste site where additional site-specific training is required; list and explain five different elements of a site control program; explain the purpose of the “buddy system” and describe three activities that “buddies” perform on a hazardous waste site; list and explain the two types of communication systems that must be used on hazardous waste sites; list four examples of waste-related emergencies and four examples of non-waste-related emergencies; explain the importance of training and drills in an emergency response plan; explain the importance of standard operating procedures (SOPs) and why they need to be followed on hazardous waste sites; list two sampling techniques used to identify hazardous materials; describe the appropriate response and handling procedures for the following site-specific hazards: radioactive materials, explosive or shock-sensitive waste, bulging drums, laboratory packs, leaking, open, or deteriorated drums, and buried drums; define the term “characterization” and explain how and why it is done on a hazardous waste site; list and explain the three safe work practices that should be used when storing hazardous materials; explain and compare the differences, advantages, and disadvantages of direct-reading instruments (DRIs) versus laboratory analysis of workplace samples; describe five situations on a hazardous waste site where workplace monitoring would usually be required; using various sample chemicals, demonstrate how to use and interpret the readings of a colorimetric tube and a multigas meter; explain the importance of daily calibration checks; list and explain the appropriate responses if a personal monitoring device or sampling pump fails; define a confined space, giving three characteristics; list two categories of confined spaces and give examples of each; list two factors that lead to fatal injuries in confined spaces; describe the four characteristics of a permit-required confined space; locate the titles of the 17 paragraphs of the OSHA Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard (HAZWOPER, 29CFR 1910.120) and describe the contents of each paragraph; explain the employee responsibilities contained in the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act); describe the 11 rights an employee has under Section 11(c) of the OSH Act; describe three conditions found in 29 CFR 1977.12 that must be present for OSHA’s ‘right to refuse hazardous work’ to apply; explain CERCLA and what the Superfund Act did for the nation; explain SARA and the changes it made; explain the worker’s role in the community relations process; and explain the guidelines that should be followed when answering questions from the public or media, regarding site cleanup operations.

Instruction:

Major topics include: pevious training and work experiences that provide practical application of previously learned concepts to real life situations. Additionally, the course covers new technologies, regulatory updates, recent advances, and lessons learned.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 1 semester hour in Construction Technology (4/16). 

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

16 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define leadership; list six skills or characteristics of an effective leader; list the six basic steps of decision making; list and explain the five key points of effective communication; explain how body language influences verbal communication; list the points to consider when evaluating a message; explain how attitude can impact communication; list the steps to follow when evaluating written communication; list the steps to follow when planning a safety meeting; explain the supervisor’s responsibilities as they relate to the site-specific safety and health plan; explain the term “living document”; identify the 14 sections of a typical site-specific safety and health plan; state the objective of a Quality Assurance Project Plan; list the typical information recorded on a chain-of-custody form; name three other kinds of records the supervisor might be responsible for maintaining; list the three categories of stress; list the four phases of disaster response; list six signs of cognitive stress response; list six signs of physical stress response; list six signs of emotional stress response; explain the purpose of debriefing sessions; list and explain the 11 requirements OSHA has established for a minimal acceptable respirator program (MARP); perform a quantitative fit test according to OSHA guidelines; perform a qualitative respirator fit test according to OSHA guidelines; list the criteria that must be factored when selecting PPE for site workers; identify and explain the two ground rules of decontamination; state at least four reasons why workplace monitoring is performed; explain the supervisor’s role in the workplace monitoring program; explain the difference between an instrument calibration and a bump check; give information that the supervisor or worker on a cleanup site can give to the media; list the times when the media may become involved with a site; state the employer’s “general duty” under the OSH Act; explain why workers’ legal rights should be respected on a hazardous waste project, even more so than on a general construction project; explain the workers’ basic rights and protections under the “Whistleblower” program; explain management’s role as it relates to safety on the job site; explain the worker’s role as it relates to safety on the job site; identify how the supervisor fits into the “big picture” of workers’ legal rights; and state the possible legal consequences of deliberate or willful disregard of safety standards on the part of the supervisor, if such action results in a serious injury or death.

Instruction:

Major topics include leadership skills, prepare for emergencies and understand the legal rights and requirements of hazardous waste workers. This course builds upon the information provided in the 80-hour Hazardous Waste Worker course.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 1 semester hour in Construction Technology (4/16). 

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

40 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the two major forms of lead used as pigments in paint; explain three ways lead poisoning can occur in residential housing; identify three examples of recreational exposure to lead; list four occupations that greatly increase lead exposure; identify the melting and boiling points of lead; list the main responsibilities of a lead-abatement supervisor; identify the routes of entry for lead entering the body; explain where lead goes and where it is stored once in the body; list the acute and chronic effects associated with lead exposure; list the body systems that can be damaged by lead exposure; explain the special hazards that lead poses for children; list the two types of medical tests used for detecting lead; explain how chelating agents help rid the body of lead; define Title X, and list four conditions Title X defines as lead-based paint hazards; define Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) and list the three goals of TSCA section 402 concerning training and certification of lead abatement workers; list the action level and permissible exposure limit (PEL) for lead under the OSHA Interim Lead Standard for Construction (29 CFR 1926.62); list the three exposure task categories, provide examples for each task and list the corresponding exposure range; describe the compliance methods the employer must follow to ensure worker exposures are reduced to or below the PEL; list three practices that are prohibited by OSHA in a lead-regulated area; explain the importance of medical surveillance to a lead abatement worker; explain medical removal protection, and describe how it works; describe the 3 types of air-purifying respirators (APRs) and list the assigned protection factor of each; list and explain at least six limitations of APRs; explain the term HEPA and state the efficiency level of a HEPA filter; explain the term “assigned protection factor” (APF) for a respirator and, given three different respirators, state the correct APF for each; explain the acronym MUC as it relates to a respirator and calculate the correct MUC for three sample respirators; explain the difference between an air purifying respirator and an atmosphere supplying respirator; explain the difference between a qualitative and quantitative fit test and give an example of each; demonstrate and explain the proper procedure for performing a positive and negative user seal check on an APR; list the personal protective equipment (PPE) used by lead abatement workers; define the following terms and acronyms: accident, confined space, GFCI, hazardous atmospheres, LFL, UFL, oxygen deficiency, lock out and tag out, personal fall arrest system, heat stress and personal hygiene; list the different levels of heat stress and describe the dangers they pose to workers; given a variety of job scenarios, describe safe work practices around the following hazards: electrical, ladders, scaffolds, housekeeping, falls, confined spaces, hazardous atmospheres; describe the fire hazards that exist in a controlled area and how to prepare for the occurrence of an accidental fire; list and identify the materials and equipment needed to perform wipe sampling; describe and demonstrate the procedure for wipe sampling lead-contaminated dust; list and identify the materials and equipment needed to sample paint chips; describe and demonstrate the paint chip sampling procedures; list and identify the materials and equipment needed to perform soil sampling; describe and demonstrate soil-sampling procedures; define clearance sampling and describe the procedures involved in performing clearance sampling; list the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) clearance levels for lead found in dust (using wipe sampling) for floors, interior windowsills, and window troughs; list the three parties that should maintain records for all abatement, interim control, risk assessment, inspection, and clearance results, and explain why; explain the responsibilities of the inspector on a lead abatement project; identify the most common inspection method used to determine the presence of lead-based paint; list the procedures defined in the inspection report to determine the presence of lead-based paint; identify the surfaces in a residence that may require abatement if they are in violation of EPA 40 CFR 745; explain the purpose of a risk assessment when trying to determine the presence of lead-based paint; list the responsibilities of a certified risk assessor; explain the role the risk assessor has in educating various parties involved in lead poisoning prevention; describe how to use at least four abatement methods; demonstrate proficiency in at least two abatement methods; demonstrate how to perform final cleanup on a lead abatement job; explain the importance of clearance inspections; list the soil and exterior abatement procedures; describe the procedures for preparing the occupant protection plan; explain the two specific situations in which the use of a negative pressure zone would be appropriate in a residential setting; given a variety of scenarios of lead abatement projects, list step-by-step procedures to ensure resident protection; list three types of insurance that owners, consultants, and contractors should have for lead abatement projects; describe the basis on which a commercial general liability (CGL) policy should be written; explain how the CGL policy should be specifically endorsed or written; describe each of the following types of insurance policies and explain their purpose: occurrence-based, errors and omissions, claims-made, liability; list and define the three types of bonds; list the three types of liability; and define tort liability.

Instruction:

Major topics focus on expansion of the Lead Abatement Worker course and supervisory training so students can lead abatement projects. This course is mandatory for all workers responsible for supervising lead-based paint activities in target housing and child-occupied facilities and exceeds the EPA’s minimum training requirements of 32 hours of training.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Construction Technology or Construction Safety (4/16). NOTE: Course content is duplicative of the Lead Abatement Worker LEAD.W course. Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit.

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

40 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the two major forms of lead used as pigments in paint; explain three ways lead poisoning can occur in residential housing; identify three examples of recreational exposure to lead; list four occupations that greatly increase lead exposure; identify the routes of entry for lead entering the body; explain where lead goes and where it is stored once in the body; list the acute and chronic effects associated with lead exposure; list the body systems that can be damaged by lead exposure; explain the special hazards that lead poses for children; list the two types of medical tests used for detecting lead; explain how chelating agents help rid the body of lead; define Title X, and list four conditions Title X defines as lead-based paint hazards; define Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) and list the three goals of TSCA section 402 concerning training and certification of lead abatement workers; list the action level and permissible exposure limit (PEL) for lead under the OSHA Interim Lead Standard for Construction (29 CFR 1926.62); list the three exposure task categories, provide examples for each task and list the corresponding exposure range; describe the compliance methods the employer must follow to ensure worker exposures are reduced to or below the PEL; list three practices that are prohibited by OSHA in a lead-regulated area; explain the importance of medical surveillance to a lead abatement worker; describe the three types of air-purifying respirators (APRs) and list the assigned protection factor of each; list and explain at least six limitations of APRs; explain the term HEPA and state the efficiency level of a HEPA filter; explain the term “assigned protection factor” (APF) for a respirator and, given three different respirators, state the correct APF for each; explain the acronym MUC as it relates to a respirator and calculate the correct MUC for three sample respirators; explain the difference between an air purifying respirator and an atmosphere supplying respirator; explain the difference between a qualitative and quantitative fit test and give an example of each; demonstrate and explain the proper procedure for performing a positive and negative user seal check on an APR; list the personal protective equipment (PPE) used by lead abatement workers; define the following terms and acronyms: accident, confined space, GFCI, hazardous atmospheres, LFL, UFL, oxygen deficiency, lock out and tag out, personal fall arrest system, heat stress and personal hygiene; list the different levels of heat stress and describe the dangers they pose to workers; given a variety of job scenarios, describe safe work practices around the following hazards: electrical, ladders, scaffolds, housekeeping, falls, confined spaces, hazardous atmospheres; describe the fire hazards that exist in a controlled area and how to prepare for the occurrence of an accidental fire; list the four sampling methods used to identify the presence of lead; explain how the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument determines the presence of lead; explain how the personal air sampling method is used to identify the presence of lead; list two ways dust samples can be collected; explain the responsibilities of the inspector on a lead abatement project; identify the most common inspection method used to determine the presence of lead-based paint; list the procedures defined in the inspection report to determine the presence of lead-based paint; identify the surfaces in a residence that may require abatement if they are in violation of EPA 40 CFR 745; explain the purpose of a risk assessment when trying to determine the presence of lead-based paint; list the responsibilities of a certified risk assessor; explain the role the risk assessor has in educating various parties involved in lead poisoning prevention; describe how to use at least four abatement methods; demonstrate proficiency in at least two abatement methods; demonstrate how to perform final cleanup on a lead abatement job; explain the importance of clearance inspections; list the soil and exterior abatement procedures; list the 10 legal rights workers have under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970; list seven responsibilities workers have under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970; list seven steps workers should follow if they are punished for exercising any right under the OSH Act; identify three control methods used to eliminate lead exposure; identify the four methods used to remove lead paint from steel structures; demonstrate the chemical removal method for lead paint on steel structures; demonstrate the manual removal method for removing lead paint from steel structures.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are designed to prepare students to work safely and productively on lead abatement projects. The course meets all Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1926.1101 and 40 CFR Part 745.225, respectively. The course is mandatory for all workers conducting lead-based paint activities in target housing and child-occupied facilities. The Lead Abatement Worker course far exceeds EPA’s minimum training requirements of 16 hours of training (with 8 hours of laboratory) for workers by fully covering required topics and dedicating a total of 40 hours to instruction, of which 8 hours are hands-on activities.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Construction Technology or Construction Safety (4/16). NOTE: Course content is duplicative of the Lead Abatement Supervisor LEAD.S course. Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit.

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

24 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the following terms: sick building syndrome, spores, and microbial contamination; list six causes of indoor air pollution; identify and describe the ideal environment for mold growth; identify at least two common symptoms associated with mold exposure; define the following terms: aspergillus, bacteria, fungi, HP, mycotoxins, ODTS, penicillium, stachybotrys chartarum (Atra), trichothecene mycotoxin, and viruses; identify the routes of entry for fungi to enter the body; list at least three reasons for performing work area monitoring and sampling; list at least three methods of sampling used to detect and identify the presence of mi­crobial contamination; describe the following three air purifying respirators and list the assigned protection fac­tor (APF) for each: Half-face Air Purifying Respirator, Full-face Air Purifying Respirator, and Full-face Powered Air Purifying Respirator; list and explain at least six limitations of Air Purifying Respirators (APRs); list and explain the three filter series and three filter efficiency levels for particulate filters; explain the terms “breakthrough” and “warning properties” and list four steps that should be taken if breakthrough occurs; explain the term “assigned protection factor” (APF) and how it relates to a respirator; correctly state the APF for the three respirators mentioned above; explain the abbreviation MUC and give the MUC for each of the same respirators men­tioned above; list and explain the nine requirements of a Respiratory Protection Program; explain the difference between a qualitative and quantitative fit test, and give an exam­ple of each; identify and describe at least three elements of work area preparation that should be completed before any microbial remediation can begin; list at least two of the most common chemicals used to destroy microbial organisms; describe the proper mixture for a bleach/water solution used during microbial remedia­tion; given the proper materials, mix a bleach/water solution in the correct proportion according to the guidelines of this course (hands-on); given a space, calculate its volume and determine the appropriate number of negative air units to achieve four air exchanges per hour; given a space, tools, and equipment, contain the space and set up a negative pressure enclosure according to the procedures recommended in this course (hands-on); given the tools, materials, equipment and PPE and a mock work area, demonstrate remediation of microbial contamination according to the guidelines of this course (hands-on); explain the importance of decontamination during microbial remediation projects and list four ways that workers may be exposed; define decontamination; list the elements of a three-chamber decontamination unit and explain the function of each; working in small groups, construct a three-chamber decontamination unit according to the guidelines in this course; given a full-face APR, a protective suit, boots, and gloves, simulate the decontamina­tion process according to the guidelines in this course.

Instruction:

Major topics focus on workers who will be employed on microbial remediation projects or job sites having the potential of having mold, moisture, and mildew hazards. The course is designed for those with no previous Asbestos or Lead Abatement Worker training. Additional hours are dedicated to hands-on activities.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Environmental Health and Safety, and Environmental Science (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

24 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: state the purpose and types of emergency alarms and identify the correct response to each; identify the NRC Form 3; explain the worker’s Rights and Responsibilities; identify the different structures that make up the nuclear power plant; identify the components that make up a nuclear reactor; differentiate from among the following terms: fission, chain reaction, critical, sub-critical, and supercritical; explain the difference between a pressurized and boiling water reactor; identify the parts that make up the atom; list the four (4) types of ionizing radiation list the three main types of ionizing radiation and give the unique characteristics, such as composition, penetration, shielding, hazard concern and properties for each type; differentiate between ionizing and non-ionizing radiation; identify the following terms: ionizing radiation, half-life, radioactive decay, radioactive material, and radiation; identify the quality factor for each type of radiation; define Rad, Rem, and QF; identify the following exposure terms: Rem, Mrem, dose rate, roentgen, Curie, Rad; list the three (3) main categories of natural sources of radiation exposure; distinguish between Natural and Artificial radiation; state the occupational radiation exposure limits for the following: whole body, extremities, skin, pregnant sorker, total organ dose; identify the radiosensitivity of various body organs; match the following items to the best definition: somatic effect, radiosensitivity, DNA, genetic effect, Acute Radiation Syndrome, and the Law of Bergonie and Tribondeau; distinguish between acute and chronic effects; identify the potential biological effect of different acute whole body radiation doses; calculate a worker’s dose using the following equation: DOSE = Dose Rate x Time; match the following terms to the best answer: dose, time, half value layer, distance, and shielding; calculate the dose rate at a given distance using the following equation: d1/(d2)2 = d3, where d1 = Dose rate at the source, d2 = Distance from the source, and d3 = Dose rate at new distance; define the term ALARA; list the basic types of radiation detection instruments, give their purpose, and the limitations of each personal dosimeter device; obtain readings during a field survey using the Ludlum Model 3 survey meter; list the basic types of personal dosimeters, give their purpose, and the limitations of each personal dosimeter device; read and calibrate the Victoreen Model 541R Pocket Dosimeter and charge it using the Victoreen Model 2000A dosimeter charge; match the following terms with the appropriate definition or example: loose contamination, fixed contamination, total contamination, airborne contamination, waterborne contamination, internal contamination, external contamination, radioactive contamination; describe the purpose of a Frisker; demonstrate the procedures for personal frisking; list the reasons for decontamination; describe the process of setting up a decontamination procedure; demonstrate the procedures for personal decontamination; identify the following terms: personnel contamination monitor, counts per minute, disintegrations per minute, swipe, and smear; describe the difference between Air Monitoring and Air Sampling; demonstrate the procedures for donning and doffing Anti-C clothing; list the requirements and benefits of a Quality Assurance Program; summarize the requirements of a Quality Assurance Program; list the worker’s obligation as related to security; define contraband and give three (3) examples of it; define what is meant by a drug-free workplace and describe the workers’ responsibilities; describe what is meant by fitness for duty; identify contractor responsibilities; identify common hazards associated with construction activities; and identify hazard protections.

Instruction:

Major topics are designed for workers involved in the maintenance and shutdown activities at nuclear power plants or whose job assignment involves unescorted access entry into areas controlled for radiological purposes, clean-up of radiological contaminated waste sites or whose job assignment involves unescorted entry into areas controlled for radiological purposes.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Radiological Science or Fundamentals of Health Physics (4/16).

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