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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Commercial Building

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

Course 1: 40 hours. Course 2: 32 hours.

Dates:

Courses 1 and 2: April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Course 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the courses, students will be able to: describe the four safe work procedures that should be followed to ensure that masonry structures have adequate strength and/or stability; describe the three types of silicosis that can affect mason tenders; describe the four types of cement contact dermatitis that can affect mason tenders; describe the correct procedure for mixing water with acid; describe the types of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) used by mason tenders and the hazards each type of PPE protects against; describe appropriate first aid procedures when given a description of an injury on a masonry construction project; describe the purpose of reinforced masonry construction; describe the functions of reinforcing steel and grout; describe the four types of reinforced masonry walls; describe how each type of wall tie and anchor is used in a masonry wall system; explain the purpose of flashing; given pictures or graphics of masonry construction or situations involving the installation of flashing, identify the areas where it is typically used; describe the purpose of control joints; given pictures or graphics of masonry construction or situations involving the installation of control joints, identify the areas where they are typically placed; explain the importance of accurately estimating masonry materials on a job; identify various types of brick and block; describe nominal dimensions in regard to estimation amounts of block and/or brick; calculate estimates for block and brick using the square foot method; calculate estimates for block and brick using the conversion method; estimate the amount of block and/or brick needed for a given project; given information on the layout (dimensions) and type of material used to construct multiple and various masonry projects, estimate the amount of block and/or brick needed for each project; explain the properties of masonry mortar; describe the characteristics of Portland cement mortars and masonry cement mortars; describe the seven types of mortar admixtures and their purposes; describe the four types of mortar mixing systems; given the appropriate materials and equipment, properly set up a power mortar mixer and mixing area; given the appropriate materials and equipment, accurately and correctly mix a batch of mortar, both manually and with a power mixer; given the appropriate materials and equipment, accurately and correctly mix a batch of colored mortar (both manually and with a power mixer); given the appropriate materials and equipment, accurately and correctly mix, place, and consolidate a batch of fine grout and coarse grout; given the appropriate materials and equipment, safely clean a power mortar mixer and mixing area; identify five hand tools that are commonly used when stocking block and/or brick; stock the materials necessary for the masons to begin construction on a masonry wall at ground level; demonstrate the ability to stock masonry materials on a scaffold for a masonry wall under construction; estimate the approximate amount of brick and block needed to complete a given section of wall; estimate he approximate amount of brick and block needed to complete a given section of wall; identify the proper personal protective equipment (PPE), tools, and equipment necessary for a mason tender; calculate the “cuts” necessary to maintain the bond in a masonry wall when given a set of masonry wall designs; describe the tasks required of a mason tender when performing housekeeping duties, equipment maintenance and shutdown; demonstrate the ability to “work the line” when given the setup, masons, and materials needed to construct a masonry wall by supplying and maintaining a consistent and quality mortar to the masons and correctly stocking materials and supplies as they are used; list the reasons mortar loses strength in cold weather; describe the types of materials that must be used during most cold-weather masonry construction; describe how masonry materials should be stored, heated, and placed during cold weather construction; explain the problems that may be encountered when constructing masonry in hot weather; list eight ways to reduce the effects of hot weather on masonry construction; explain five precautionary measures that can be taken to keep masonry walls clean; list three categories of cleaning failures; describe the different types of cleaning problems (i.e., efflorescence, white scum, green stain and brown stain); explain how cleaning failures can be prevented and cleaned; describe the proper method for cleaning a section of masonry wall using the following methods: bucket and brush hand cleaning, pressurized water cleaning and abrasive blasting; properly set up a stationary masonry saw; demonstrate the procedure for mounting and “ring testing” both a diamond blade and abrasive wheel; demonstrate how to maintain and clean a stationary masonry saw; perform the following types of cuts with a masonry saw: step cut, chop cut, cutting-head-positioned-down cut, and angle cut; demonstrate the proper donning and use of the personal protective equipment (PPE) needed when operating a masonry saw; describe at least 10 safe work practices that should be followed when operating a masonry saw; identify when masonry walls need to be braced; identify the components of a wall bracing system; calculate the maximum spacing between braces; identify the tools and materials needed for bracing a masonry wall; install all necessary bracing on a masonry wall under construction correctly and efficiently according to course guidelines; describe the three basic types of plaster; describe the various types of bases to which plasters can be applied; describe scratch coat, brown coat, and finish coat; describe the purpose and desired properties of both water and sand/aggregates when mixing gypsum plasters and stucco; and correctly and accurately proportion and mix gypsum base coat plaster, veneer plasters, and stucco with a mechanical machine and by hand.

Instruction:

Course 1 and 2: Major topics include: different types of masonry construction, masonry unit identification, material estimation and stocking procedures, the mason tender’s general duties, and the typical work that laborers perform on masonry construction job sites. Proper mortar mixing techniques, the use of admixtures, and the effect of weather on mortar are also addressed. Additionally, these courses provide instruction on how to safely brace newly erected masonry walls, present safety and health issues of the mason tender including silicosis, and address the use of proper personal protective equipment.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 5 semester hours in Introduction to Masonry Technology (4/16).  NOTE: Both courses must be successfully completed to gain access to credit recommendation.

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

32 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list six different types of drilling applications and identify the appropriate type of drilling technique needed in each application; identify the most common types of aboveground drilling equipment and describe their uses; identify at least three aboveground drilling job site hazards and methods to control each hazard; list the health hazards of aboveground drilling and describe a method to control each hazard; identify and demonstrate the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) needed for aboveground drilling work; identify the class of several types of explosives; name the categories in the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (BATF) explosive classification system and give at least one example of a material in each category; identify the appropriate safety precautions for storing, transporting, handling, protecting and drilling around explosives; give examples of at least three tools that are powered by compressors; identify the components of airlines and fittings and demonstrate methods for connecting and securing them to tools and other fittings; list at least three precautions to take when working with a compressor in extreme temperatures; using a set of typical compressor problems, match troubleshooting checks with each problem; describe three types of drilling; identify the principal components of a drill string and describe the purpose of each; identify at least three drill bits and describe where they work best; list two causes of “bound steel” and at least one method to prevent each; describe and demonstrate the steps to “collar a hole”; list at least three factors that affect proper alignment of a borehole; describe and demonstrate the steps to add drill steel and remove drill steel from the drill string; describe at least two problems that prevent the flushing and removal of cuttings and at least one method to prevent each problem; describe at least two maintenance or critical operating practices that will prolong the life of the drill string; describe and identify the three most common types of rock; describe at least two types of borehole patterns and demonstrate how to lay them out; describe the safety hazards associated with operating a jackhammer and give at least one method to control each hazard; identify the components of the jackhammer’s lubrication system and demonstrate the proper lubricating procedures using the proper tools, materials and equipment; identify four types of bits used with jackhammers and give descriptions of each; demonstrate operation of a jackhammer; describe and demonstrate techniques for collaring and drilling a hole; explain the purpose of clearing cuttings from the borehole; and list five common problems that occur when drilling with a jackhammer.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the care and use of tools and equipment, as well as drilling techniques. Basic information about rocks and their composition and characteristics is introduced, as drillers must know how geology affects the drilling process. The personal safety of CCL's working on a drilling site is reviewed in depth. Site safety, health hazards, personal protective equipment, and working around explosives are also covered.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 2 semester hours in Construction Technology (4/16). 

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

32 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe what asphalt is and how it is made; list six modern-day uses for asphalt; identify and explain the proper care and use of nine asphalt hand tools; identify 10 types of heavy equipment used on asphalt jobs and explain their use; explain the responsibilities of the five work classifications of a typical asphalt crew: shovelers, rakers, screed man, paver operator and roller operator; demonstrate the proper method for shoveling and raking asphalt; explain and demonstrate the proper method for repairing a pothole; explain the reason for sealing asphalt surfaces and cracks; list and identify at least four hazards on an asphalt worksite and describe at least one method for eliminating or avoiding each hazard; list and identify nine types of protective clothing and equipment used when working with asphalt and explain the purpose of each; list and describe two asphalt pavement methods; calculate equipment and material needed for an asphalt-paving job using various jobsite scenarios; describe the operation and purpose of a floating screed; list and describe the tasks performed on a paving project; list and describe the three phases of asphalt compaction; list and identify the three categories of asphalt damage and explain the method of repair for each; describe and demonstrate the four steps for sawing a full depth asphalt patch; explain the role of pavement milling in performing partial depth asphalt repair; describe and demonstrate the seven steps required when performing skim patch repairs; describe the procedure for constructing a bridge approach; and demonstrate the set-up and calibration of electronic grade and slope control.

Instruction:

Major topics include: safety precautions necessary when working with, raking and placing asphalt, preparation of the surface, job preparation, and cleaning of the tools and machinery and patching of potholes and cracks, along with proper raking techniques. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Construction Methods and Materials, and Construction Math (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

40 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the difference between a transit and a level; identify three types of advanced layout instruments used; list and demonstrate proper hand signals; identify the components of a field book, and describe the purpose of each; record information in a field book neatly and accurately; identify six tools commonly used in surveying procedures; measure the distance between two points using a surveyor’s tape or chain accurately to within ± /02'; measure from a given point and set a hub on a line; read and set angles on the vernier; given a point, correctly set up and level an instrument over the point; turn angles off of a base line and set new hubs; set up the instrument between two points; define the terms: angle, arc, baseline, chord, contour, diameter, radius, and right triangle; complete basic geometry problems on a worksheet and calculate area and volume for basic geometric shapes; accurately add and subtract angles; find the length of a vareity of objects using both the U.S. standard and decimal systems (80% correct) given common construction measuring equipment; convert measurements given in the standard system to their decimal equivalents; given a hand-held sight level (Locke level) device and a benchmark, find the elevation of various points; demonstrate basic surveying procedures for horizontal and vertical measuring, and controlling elevation with a margin of error not greater than .05" (five hundredths); given scenarios involving station designations on a construction site, calculate distances using station equations; given locations marked on a grid system, calculate their coordinates; explain the difference between in line and right angle referencing; describe the procedure for finding points from offset stakes; describe the procedure for finding both curb grade and top of curb elevation from the offset stakes; given dimensions from two known points, find a hidden point using swing tie referencing; find vertical and horizontal distances to a point from the information given on slope stakes; given a slope stake and the proper tools, set jump stakes showing the correct cut or fill along the slope; explain three types of slopes used on a roadway job and where and why each would be used; explain the procedure for making cuts and fills in a roadway construction project; explain the purpose of grade sheets and how they are used to find elevations for roadway construction; given a problem with earthmoving on a roadway project, find the number of cubic yards of dirt that will need to be cut or filled; given a problem with sub-base fill, find the tonnage of aggregate that will be needed; and given problems with quantities of surfacing material, find the tonnage of asphalt and the cubic yards of concrete that will be needed.

Instruction:

Major topics include the skills, knowledge and aptitude necessary to operate a variety of surveying instruments and to record information for maintaining elevation and alignment control points on heavy and civil construction projects.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Introduction to Surveying (4/16). NOTE: Course content is duplicative of the Construction: Total System Fundamentals course. Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit.

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

16 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: recognize whether a surface is acceptable for an overlay; describe the tools and equipment needed for overlays; perform the steps of the overlay process, while maintaining all safety regulations, including prepping surface, mixing product, applying overlay, sealing overlay and scoring overlay; and identify solutions to common mistakes made in the overlay process.

Instruction:

Major topics include: criteria for concrete overlay application, different types of overlays, tools for the job, and work techniques. In small groups, participants mix, apply, stamp, stencil, score, and seal concrete overlays. Special emphasis is placed on practicing safe and correct work practices and identifying and using proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 1 semester hour in Construction Technology (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

24 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to polish a concrete surface to a specific degree of shine and smoothness when given the proper tools and equipment.

Instruction:

Major topics include: two methods of concrete polishing, types of pads, hardeners and densifiers, and the tools and equipment used to polish concrete. Participants are given ample opportunity to learn and practice polishing techniques using hand-held and walk-behind polishers. Special emphasis is placed on practicing safe and correct work practices, identifying health hazards and using personal protection equipment.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 1 semester hour in Construction Technology (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

40 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list the three most common types of concrete work; define the following terms: grade, sub-grade, foundation/footing, slab, finished grade, batterboards and string lines; lay out a batter-board and string-line setup for a slab using a leveling instrument to establish proper grade; calculate volume quantities for regular and irregular shapes to within 0.02 cubic yards; calculate the amount of concrete needed for various concrete forms of certain dimensions; describe and identify basic hardware, tools and common forming systems; describe three safety hazards associated with concrete formwork operations and describe at least one action to take in preventing each hazard; given a drawing of a slab to be built, list the tools, equipment, hardware and materials needed to lay out and build the formwork for the slab; given the necessary tools, hardware and materials, lay out and build the formwork for a slab, wall and column to within 0.02” grade; describe at least two hazards of form removal and cleanup, and describe at least one method to protect against each hazard; demonstrate form cleaning, stacking and storage procedures; describe five basic types of Portland cement and the uses of each; list five common concrete admixtures; describe the effects of each admixture in placement, consolidation, and finishing concrete; describe the primary health effect caused by skin exposure to cement, and identify the personal protective equipment (PPE) used to prevent skin exposure; describe five methods of transporting concrete to the placement area, and at least one situation that warrants each method; identify at least three tools used in concrete placement; describe three problems that can result from over-vibration of placed concrete and three problems that can result from under-vibration of placed concrete; demonstrate concrete placement techniques for slabs and walls; identify common tools used for finishing concrete and describe the purpose of each tool; describe three methods for curing concrete; demonstrate proper concrete finishing technique and at least one method of curing concrete.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the safety issues associated with the mixing, forming, placement, and curing of concrete materials, as well as the associated skills needed to prepare a site for concrete placement, building forms, estimating concrete quantities, concrete placement, consolidation and finishing, concrete repair, sawing, coring and drilling. Ample time is given for hands-on practice for all skills.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 2 semester hours in Construction Technology (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

16 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the basic process of exposing aggregate in concrete using the seeding, brushing, and washing method; given the proper tools, equipment, and PPE, demonstrate the seeding method for creating an exposed aggregate finish on a freshly placed slab of concrete; describe three finishing techniques used to enhance the appearance of colored concrete; describe the basic process of stenciling freshly placed concrete; given the proper tools, equipment, and PPE, demonstrate the process of concrete stenciling on a slab of freshly placed concrete; describe the process of stamping freshly placed concrete; given the proper tools, equipment, and PPE, demonstrate the process of stamping concrete on a slab of freshly placed concrete; describe four factors that may affect the appearance of a stained concrete finish; and describe three applications for spray-top finishes.

Instruction:

Major topics include: various concrete finishes (exposed aggregate, colored concrete, stenciling concrete, and stamping concrete). Participants learn factors that affect the quality/appearance of each, materials used, processes for applying each finish, and health and safety factors. Participants observe, practice, and demonstrate the process for creating each decorative finish. Safety and proper work techniques are emphasized.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 1 semester hour in Construction Technology (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

32 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define demolition and list three reasons for demolition activities; define three primary types of building demolition: mechanical demolition, “gut-out” demolition, and explosive demolition; define the concept of “deconstruction,” how it differs from demolition and why it can be preferable to demolition; identify at least three types of structures that may be subject to demolition; list at least three reasons why preplanning a demolition project is important and demonstrate the ability to complete the main requirements of a demolition work plan; identify at least two plans (other than a demolition work plan) needed to support a demolition project and define who is responsible for their implementation; state the importance of noise control and list at least three techniques for minimizing noise during demolition activities; describe two types of environmental issues that are important for demolition planning; list at least six general safety issues that are relevant during demolition operations; list at least four examples of special personal protective equipment that may be required when performing demolition or deconstruction activities and explain why; list and describe at least six hazardous materials typically found on a demolition/deconstruction job site where they are found, and what to do if you find them; describe at least three weather related hazards that may impact safety on a demolition/deconstruction job site and explain how to protect yourself from these hazards; identify at least four physical hazards that may be encountered on a demolition or deconstruction job and what you must do to make them safe; name at least three examples of confined spaces found on a demolition/deconstruction job site; name at least three types of emergencies and explain what should be done in each type of emergency; describe where to find the company’s emergency response plan; identify the OSHA regulations that apply to demolition site operations; state the purpose of site control; given a layout and options, demonstrate the purpose and application of barricades, warning tape, traffic cones, etc., when used during demolition/deconstruction activities; name three ways to increase effective site security to prevent damage and loss; list and describe the five main types of site control measures for a demolition or deconstruction project; name seven hazards to demolition workers posed by working around utilities; identify hazards that are posed by non-utility piping, such as sewers and chemical process lines, in industrial plants and explain how the risk can be reduced; explain why all utilities must be considered “live” until they are clearly disconnected or isolated; list common lockout/tagout procedures when working around electrical equipment; given a utility, identify who commonly is called on to locate its components; list at least four steps to take in the event of an emergency connected to utilities; describe the factors that impact the type of equipment selected for use in mechanical demolitions; list at least five safety considerations when working around mechanical demolitions; name eight types of equipment used for demolition and describe the capability of each; name at least four key roles that laborers play during mechanical demolition activities; list the five general types of special working conditions; list at least two hazards that may be encountered when performing water demolition work over and/or around water and describe ways to minimize the risks; describe the three different methods of chimney demolition; identify and describe at least three structural post-disaster hazards; identify and describe at least three biological post-disaster hazards; define deconstruction and demolition and explain how they differ; name three different types of demolition and describe each; list at least 10 commonly recoverable building materials and components; name at least five recyclable materials that can be recovered from building deconstruction; name at least four types of salvageable equipment; describe the typical sequence of deconstruction; list at least three safety issues and three safety measures related to performing deconstruction work; demonstrate the ability to remove several salvageable materials without damage.

Instruction:

Major topics include: planning projects, mechanical demolition equipment, material handling, site control, and special conditions that sometimes exist during this work. Particular attention is paid to safety in all aspects of the work.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category,  2 semester hours in Construction Methods and Materials, Construction Safety or Construction Technology (4/16).

Location:

LIUNA Pomfret, CT, and other LIUNA approved training centers

Length:

45 hours.

Dates:

April 2011 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the terms: global positioning system (GPS), latitude and longitude (the basis of global coordinates), and GPS system segments; describe the principles of operation of a GPS; list and explain the applications of a GPS; explain such GPS measuring techniques as static, differential, and real time kinematics; given a GPS system, demonstrate the setup and configuration of the base station and rover, and demonstrate the various measuring techniques according to the guidelines of this course; list and explain the potential errors that can be encountered when using a GPS; and when given a sample structure, to lay out and demonstrate the use of the GPS system and COGO (coordinate geometry) software functions.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the introduction of how GPS works and how it is used in construction, as well as how to set up and operate GPS using several measuring techniques. Students observe, practice, and demonstrate the use of the GPS system and COGO software for a sample structure. Special emphasis is placed on following proper procedures and developing safe work habits. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (4/16).

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