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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Accounting, Business, and Finance Courses-National Paralegal College

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2016 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the ethical responsibilities of managers and how ethical decision making occurs in an organization; identify ethical risks and issues in making ethical decisions in the workplace, specifically in business; analyze the responsibilities of ethical leadership; elucidate the relationships between ethics, social responsibility, and sustainability of a firm; describe how managers are important gatekeepers with internal and external stakeholders; evaluate the social responsibility of firms; examine external pressures for ethical decisions related to regulatory and self-regulated organizations; formulate a particular position on a business ethics issue and defend it in a professional business manner through writing.

Instruction:

This course addresses the challenges and leadership requirements to develop and implement ethical business strategies, as well as guidance to avoid unethical conduct. Readings, cases, and debate issues cover specific issues involving business ethics and how to identify risks associated with ethical decision making, many of which affect the reputation and success of an entire firm.  In this course, students learn that business ethics is a team activity that requires knowledge and leadership at all levels of management. The course is highly interactive and challenges students to apply course material through a variety of in-class exercises. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resource Management, Management, Operations Management, Marketing, Finance, or Accounting (3/18).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:
May 2008 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the centrality of clear and efficient writing in today's business environment and the major obstacles therein; adjust sentence style to improve clarity, determination, and emphasis; employ gender-neutral language according to current workplace standards; perform accurate audience analyses and correlate them with specific purposes; create coherent outlines and apply a range of organizational techniques; discuss and apply strategies for motivation and persuasion and apply them to sales letters, claims, and proposals; responsibly gather and analyze data from primary and secondary sources; plan and execute periodic reports, project proposals, and research proposals; write reports and presentations in a collaborative setting; and compose effective resumes and application letters.

Instruction:

This course teaches students how to plan, compose, and execute effective business documents according to current professional standards. Emphasis focuses on considerations of purpose, audience, organization, and style and provides broad guidelines for composition and targeted strategies for specific kinds of documents. Special attention is given to the collection and analysis of data for use in reports and presentations. Major topics include: understanding business communication; interpersonal communication skills; the writing process; revisions; routine and persuasive messages; report planning and writing; data management; oral presentations; and employment communication. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Writing,  Business, Communication, English, Journalism, Marketing, or Liberal Studies (1/13) (3/18 revalidation). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

August 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain theoretical concepts of compensation management as they relate to economic, legal, social and organizational considerations; define the concept of total compensation; analyze the interrelation between compensation and benefit systems with retention of qualified and skilled employees; apply the tools of compensation design to attract and retain an appropriate workforce; align compensation packages with organizational goals; describe legal, union, and other constraints applicable to the development of compensation systems.

Instruction:

This course explains how compensation and benefit systems have become an integral part of human resource management. There is an in-depth investigation of the principles, techniques and strategies used in developing and implementing compensation and reward systems. The course examines both direct and indirect salary and other compensation systems. The focus is on the role of human resources in managing competitive rewards and pay plans to achieve the appropriate goals of public and private organizations. The course also discusses the interrelationship among employee performance and pay, issues of executive compensation, laws and regulations that influence compensation. Evaluation criteria includes: practice assignments; class participation; exams.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resource Management, Management, or Operations Management (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

February 2016 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: articulate the manners in which companies can raise capital through public markets; determine the advantages and disadvantages of accepting corporate debt to finance company operations; analyze various capital structure factors that apply to perfect capital markets and to capital markets affected by debt, taxes, etc.; describe the advantages and disadvantages of issuing corporate dividends; participate in financial modeling and forecasting of profits and expansion; assist in the management of working capital; describe the process of a merger or acquisition and the defenses that are available to the target of a hostile takeover; apply the concepts learned in this course to international companies and international corporate finance.

Instruction:

This course is a continuation of Principles of Finance (FIN-101). Instruction focuses on advanced concepts specifically relevant to corporate finance and corporate valuation. Students explore capital structure and valuation techniques, options and their valuation and concludes with an in-depth look at both long-term and short-term financing options for corporations and their relative strengths and weaknesses. Evaluation criteria include: assigned readings; assignments; class participation; and a final exam. Prerequisite: Principles of Finance (FIN-101).

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Corporate Finance, Capital Budgeting, or Financial Management (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

October 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: articulate the role of global human resources management professionals; compare differences in global and domestic human resources management; analyze cultural issues related to global human resources management; summarize influences to organizational structures for global companies; determine staffing strategies that meet global organizational needs; anticipate human resources management responsibilities in mergers and acquisitions; develop best practices for global human resources management; contrast differences in national labor systems; prepare a corporate code of conduct for a multi-national company; and discuss emerging issues in global human resources management.

Instruction:

This course examines human resource management in a global business environment. Students learn about philosophies of strategic management of people, culture and labor systems related to different types of institutions and organizations that operate in a global context. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, practice assignments; class participation; and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resource Management, International Business, or Management (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

July 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the historical and present day importance of human resource management and its related subcategories; identify, describe, and apply the theories of human resource management and apply theories to practical organizational scenarios; utilize appropriate terminology when discussing the human resource management discipline; critically analyze the importance of micro-, meso-, and macro-level job analysis; convey the importance of human resources management compliance in relation to laws, regulations, and diversity; compare and contrast the importance of training and development; explain the components associated with compensation and benefits; and apply legal knowledge related to organizational governance to “real world” situations.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an introductory overview of the topic of Human Resource Management (HRM), the strategic functionality of an organization. Course topics include, but are not limited to: the law, governance, and rights of employees, organizational diversity, staffing, employee development, compensation and benefits, and international HRM. This course begins with an introduction to the historical and present-day role of HRM, including relevant vocabulary used in the field. Students explore the role that subtopics of the discipline play in an organization’s success. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, practice assignments; class participation; and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resource Management, Management, Entrepreneurship, or Organizational Behavior (3/18).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.  

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify national differences in politics and culture; illustrate the effects of ethics on international business; explain international trade theory; describe the political economy of international business; outline the effect of foreign direct investment; discuss examples of regional economic integration; demonstrate how the foreign exchange markets work; identify and explain the roles of the international monetary system and global capital markets; show various strategies and organizational structures in international businesses; identify and choose the appropriate entry strategy and necessary strategic alliances given a fact set; lay out the details and differences between exporting, importing, and countertrade; prove how global production, outsourcing, and logistics affect the international marketplace; explain how cultural and national differences affect global marketing and Research and Development; and account for international business, using various countries as stakeholders.

Instruction:

This course is an introduction to International Business and explores the pros and cons of economic theories, government policies, business strategies, and organizational structures in the global business world. Emphasis is on differences in economies; differing ethical issues facing today's executives; and the substantial role that politics play in international commerce. Major topics include: Globalization; Political Economy; Economic Development; Cultural Differences; Ethics in International Business; International Trade Theory; Political Economy of International Trade; Foreign Direct Investment; Regional Economic Integration; Foreign Exchange Market; International Monetary System; Global Capital Markets; Strategy and Organization of International Business; and Entry Strategy and Strategic Alliances. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in International Business or Business (1/13) (3/18 revalidation). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

November 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: delineate the key issues and events affecting the current and future status of labor relations and formulate his or her own conclusions and opinions; identify, interpret, and apply the federal statutes relevant to labor-management relations; discuss the impact of the principal historical developments that have influenced the evolution of unionism in the United States; describe the relationship between labor and management in American business and the influence on that relationship of economic, social, statutory, and regulatory policies and systems; analyze and evaluate the process of union representation, collective bargaining, contract administration, dispute resolution, as well as the roles of labor and management representatives within their respective entities; explain the impact of technology tools on labor relations; interpret the significance of labor relations in the context of international commerce.

Instruction:

This course is the study of the development of labor relations in the United States, methods of organizing employees, and the tools that organized groups in industry use to represent labor. Specifically, the course discusses the type of employees represented by unions, and the settlement process of labor disputes in a union context, as well as labor union and employer associations involved in arbitration, mediation, and conciliation. Public sector unions are considered in contrast to private sector unions. Topics include: collective bargaining, trade agreements, strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and injunctions. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, practice assignments; class participation; and a final exam. Prerequisite: Human Resources Management (BUS-111).

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Labor Relations (3/18).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:
January 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss major macroeconomic issues such as economic growth, unemployment, and inflation; define and measure GDP and conduct international comparisons of economic growth; calculate unemployment and explain changes over the business cycle; construct the consumer price index (CPI) and explain its relation to inflation; identify components of the aggregate supply and demand and discuss effects of their fluctuations on the macroeconomic equilibrium; explain the Classical Model including features of the general economy at full employment; identify and discuss causes and measurement of economic growth; examine the role of money and banking institutions and the role of the Federal Reserve in controlling money supply; explain causes of inflation (demand-pull and cost-push theories and their effects on inflation); use a Phillips curve to explain the relation between inflation and unemployment in the short and long run; use Fiscal Policy doctrine to explain the federal budget and the effects of the income tax on markets and governmental budgets; use Fiscal Polity to discuss the effects of tax on savings and investments that the Federal Government uses to stabilize the price leave; and challenge and defend the credibility of monetary policy, the McCallum Rule and the Taylor Rule.

Instruction:

This introductory course is for students with no prior background in Economics, yet have a working knowledge of High School Algebra. The instructional approach is mostly non-quantitative with some emphasis on graphic analysis. Students learn basic macroeconomic concepts on the aggregate supply and demand of outputs in the general economy, economic growth and unemployment, and the role of money and banking institutions in affecting the economy's price level and inflation. Students also study various fiscal and monetary policies used by the government to stabilize economic fluctuations. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Macroeconomics, Principles of Economics, or Business (1/13) (3/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:
May 2010 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the organization of information systems in general and their roles of the modern organization in a web-based environment; describe how businesses generally use information systems; assist in the management of both data and knowledge in managing an organization; describe the infrastructure of the information technology system; discuss the roles of e-business and e-commerce in today's business environment; determine the extent to which wireless and mobile computing must be taken into account when managing an organization's delivery of information over the internet; explain how information systems can be acquired and applied; and manage information systems as they relate to ethical and social issues, especially those unique to the information age.
Instruction:

This course is an introduction to Information Technology and its applications to the business world. Students explore issues related to conducting business in a web-based environment and how to achieve a competitive advantage in a successful digital information system. Major topics include: information technology infrastructure; wireless and mobile computing; and building and management of systems from the organizational and managerial perspective. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Information Systems, Information Sciences, or Business Management (1/13) (3/18 revalidation). 

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