Skip to main content

National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Search Google Appliance

Miscellaneous Courses-National Paralegal College

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:
November 2010 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: outline the history of Sociology as a field; identify the manner in which sociological research is conducted; consider ethical and social ramifications of sociological research when conducting such research; compare and contrast culture and diversity; determine the interaction between human nature and socialization and the effect the former has on the latter in a variety of contexts; characterize societal institutions on the macro and micro levels; ascertain the role of technology on society and human interaction; detail the effects of mass media on socialization; identify roles of social groups and organizations on human society and interaction; and analyze the role of deviance from societal norms on society and discuss the social control of such behavior exercised by society.
Instruction:
This is an introductory course for students with no prior background in Sociology. Students are guided through the process of asking and answering important questions from a sociological perspective by exercising critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they're exposed to sociological theories and research that can be applied to important social issues. The course teaches how individuals are organized into social groups, ranging from intimate groups to bureaucracies and how these influence individual behavior and the nature and interrelationships of basic social institutions such as family, education, religion, and the economy. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology (1/13) (3/18 revalidation). 

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

Version 1: July 2011 -  February 2018. Version 2: March 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe and define mass and cultural landscape; explicate the historical significance of sounds and images; identify how media conveys messages through words and pictures; recognize the business of mass media; define United States democratic expression in mass media; outline how media impacts daily life of citizens; asses the ethical issues raised by the production of media; recite how visual culture has transformed the United States; apply critical thinking skills when discussing media; explain print revolution and increased use of the Internet; evaluate media and the law; recognize media's role in governance; assess mass media and cultural change; and compare and contrast global effects of various types of media.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: history and current state of mass communication in the United States from early newspapers and periodicals to the rise of the Internet and global media corporations; influence that mass media has had on culture and decisions; how to approach media from a critical thinking perspective. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Mass Communication, Media Studies, or as a Humanities elective (1/13). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Marketing, Communication, Journalism, Liberal Studies, English, Media Studies, or as a Humanities elective (3/18 revalidation). 

Top