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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Government/History Courses-National Paralegal College

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:
November 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how American democracy functions; detail the history and debates surrounding the Constitution; understand the genesis of the protection of civil liberties and civil rights; explain how mass media impact the political process; cite examples and explanations of how Americans participate in politics; identify the roles and operations of political parties; discuss the Electoral College and its criticisms; define special interest groups and lobbies and how they work; assess the effects of the interplay between the President and Congress with respect to how laws are enacted; explicate the role of the Federal Judicial System; define the challenges for policymaking in the 21st century; join the debate over healthcare as public policy; and discuss and classify the latest threats to national security.

Instruction:

This introductory course in American Government provides a basic understanding of the American political process. The primary focus is on the individuals, groups, and institutions who form and inform the federal government and how laws have evolved. Students learn how government functions at the national, state, and local levels and come to understand the workings of participatory democracy. Students are encouraged to become active contributors to the political system by learning how government impacts their lives and how they can make a difference in the lives of others. Major topics include: The United States Constitution; Federal Judicial System; lobbying and special interest groups; and the roles and relationships among the President, Congress, and court systems. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in American Government or Introduction to American Politics (1/13) (3/18 revalidation). 

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: detail the process, nature, and motivation behind European exploration and colonization of America; explain the impact and legacy of slavery; identify the context, root causes, and consequences of the American Revolution; describe the campaign for and prelude leading to the writing and passage of the Constitution; discuss the effects of American policies on Native Americans and the long-term implications thereof; trace the series of events that caused Westward expansion; explicate the speed, nature, costs, benefits, and public policy dilemmas of the building of the United States economy and the United States Industrial Revolution; summarize the reasons for The Civil War and how it scarred the nation; and explain the prominent historical viewpoints regarding Reconstruction and explain its failure.

Instruction:

This introductory course surveys American History from the colonial period through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Students learn about migration from Europe and Africa and the formation of colonies, the impact of settlement on Native Americans and the development of new social and political ideas as the country was created. Major topics include: European exploration and colonization of America; slavery; American Revolution; United States Constitution; Westward Expansion; United States Industrial Revolution; and the Civil War. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in American History, History, Liberal Arts, or Social Sciences (1/13) (3/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:
September 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the settlement of the West after The Civil War; explain the near destruction of Native American tribes; trace the growth of big business and the industrial age along with its implications for Americans of different backgrounds; cite reasons for relentless process of urbanization and the rise of the middle class; assess the root causes of demands for various reforms and popular movements; detail the dilemmas facing the United States in each world war and discuss United States involvement therein; understand the Great Depression and its effects on the institution of government in the United States; explicate the rise of segregation and the Civil Rights movement; and discuss the effects of the Vietnam War and its aftermath.

Instruction:

This course is a continuation of American History I, convening the period from Reconstruction through the end of the twentieth century. Students study the westward expansion, social movements that brought tremendous change to U.S. laws and government, and the causes and consequences of the most deadly wars of the last century. Major topics include: The Civil War; United States Industrial Age; Urbanization; Great Depression; Segregation; and The Vietnam War. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in American History, History, Liberal Arts, or Social Sciences (1/13) (3/18 revalidation).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

August 2010 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe political systems and states; detail the process of fostering economic development; understand why people compare political systems; pinpoint the structures and functions of political systems; explicate why and how culture matters to political processes; identify trends shaping contemporary political cultures; explain how citizens participate in sociopolitical affairs in different societies; discuss the development of interest groups, describing their historical performances; define authoritarian party systems and their power structures; assess the prospects and challenges facing democracies and authoritarianism; trace the geographic distribution of government power; and explain the process of community building; and present the common outcomes of international interactions and their generalities.

Instruction:

This course provides students with a broad survey of important issues in the study of comparative politics and allows them to gain understanding of world politics and political systems and to compare issues and structures on a global level. Students conduct in-depth studies of individual countries and examine how local issues have a worldwide impact. Each country study applies a theoretical framework to explore broad issues like why some countries modernize more quickly or why some are more democratic. Additionally, students explore the impact of politics on individual, group, national, and global levels. Throughout the semester, students study political institutions and processes and think critically about the consequences of public policies. Major topics include: political systems; Special Interest Groups; Authoritarian Party Systems; Community Building; and International Interactions. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Comparative Government or Politics (1/13) (3/18 revalidation). 

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