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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Science - Eastwick College

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

72 hours and an additional 24 hours lab.

Dates:

August 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Explain the fundamental anatomical and physiological concepts related to cells, tissues, membranes, the musculoskeletal system, blood and lymph, and the respiratory system; Distinguish between the different types of cell transport (osmosis, diffusion and active transport) and different types of solutions, such as hypertonic, hypotonic and isotonic concentrations; Explain the fundamental biological and physiological concepts that relate to the structure and function of the various body systems covered, such as the structure and function of the skeletal muscles, the types of blood cells and the organs that correlate to the respiratory system; List the various tests and studies that are utilized to evaluate relevant body systems, such as x-rays to evaluate the skeleton and identify fractures, skin biopsy to evaluate skin lesions, or pulmonary function tests used to diagnose various respiratory diseases; Discuss the common diseases associated with each system, including the prognosis and treatments that are associated with deviations from normal structure and function; Use scientific analysis to complete laboratory experiments and quantify the results at the conclusion of the experiments.

Instruction:

Major topics include: An introduction to the basic principles of human anatomy and physiology that emphasizes some common diseases in relation to the various body systems. The topics covered include an understanding of cells, tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, blood, lymphatic, and respiratory systems. Outside preparation activities include completion of written chapter assignments and online activities using Connect ™.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Anatomy and Physiology I (distributed as 3 semester hours didactic and 1 semester hour clinical lab) (5/22). NOTE: This course was previously evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). To view credit recommendations previously established by ACE, visit the ACE National Guide  

Length:

72 hours and an additional 24 hours laboratory (12 weeks). 

Dates:

August 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Explain the fundamental anatomical and physiological concepts related to the body system covered such as the digestive tract, the urinary system and the nervous system; Distinguish between the different types of physiological and anatomical functions that are carried out by each body system; such as cardiac blood flow, digestive processes and hormone actions, the depolarization/repolarization of the neurons, filtration at the level of the nephron, and the process of the menstrual cycle in the female reproductive system; Describe the basic structures of the organs which make up the systems covered in the unit; such as the GI tract, kidney, heart, pituitary gland and reproductive organs; Demonstrate an understanding of how specific enzymes, hormones, and neurotransmitters influence the body to maintain homeostasis; List the various tests and studies that are utilized to evaluate relevant body systems; such as urinalysis to diagnose urinary tract infections, MRI to view the central nervous system, or cardiac EKG to evaluate arrhythmias; Use scientific analysis to complete laboratory experiments and quantify the results at the conclusion of the experiments.

Instruction:

Major topics include: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of human anatomy and physiology that emphasizes some common diseases in relation to the various body systems. The topics covered include an understanding of digestive, urinary, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Outside preparation activities include completion of written chapter assignments and online activities using Connect™. Prerequisite: BIO101 Anatomy and Physiology I.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Anatomy and Physiology II (distributed as 3 semester hours didactic and 1 semester hour clinical lab) (5/22). NOTE: This course was previously evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). To view credit recommendations previously established, visit the ACE National Guide

Length:

24 hours (12 Weeks)

Dates:

September 2020 – Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: Explain the central in central service: central service workflow; basic job knowledge and skills; basic job responsibilities; basic central service concerns; identify regulations and standards; US Food and Drug Administration; other federal regulation agencies; professional associations; review tools for cleaning, point of use preparation and transport, cleaning and decontamination, disinfection of surgical instrumentation, central service and infection prevention and control; OSHA blood borne pathogen standards; central service environment; principles of asepsis; explain quality in central service operations; discuss common workplace safety hazards; identify flash sterilization standards; describe the importance of managing inventory; review the need to track equipment; describe an overview of sterile packaging process; discuss factors that impact sterilization; explain patient care equipment.

Instruction:

Major topics include: textbook reading; lecture; workbook assignments; exams; discussion; oral review of assignments; group activities. Prerequisite: BIO 101, BIO 201, BIO 103

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Allied Health, Surgical Technology, or Nursing (5/22). NOTE: This course was previously evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). To view credit recommendations previously established, visit the ACE National Guide.

Length:

2 hours’ lecture per week. (12 weeks)

Dates:

August 2014 - Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to:

 

  1. Analyze the court system.
  2. Identify the different types of legal entities and types of managed care delivery systems.
  3. Describe the importance of understanding basic employment, discrimination, and harassment laws when hiring, promoting, and terminating employees.
  4. Differentiate between federal and state law and parties to a lawsuit.
  5. Identify behavior that is classified as criminal and differentiate criminal and civil causes of action.
  6. Explain the elements necessary to make a contract and how express and implied contracts are formed.
  7. Distinguish between a cause of action for negligence and one for malpractice and list the elements of each. Analyze the phases of a malpractice trial.
  8. Define the importance of health record credibility and who owns the medical record.
  9. Distinguish between law, morals, ethics, and etiquette.
  10. Distinguish between privacy, confidentiality, and privileged communication.
  11. Identify some of the problems faced by medical professionals allocating resources and doing medical research and experimentation.
  12. Recognize the impact of expanding technology on ethical questions involving birth and the beginning of life.
  13. Articulate the need for a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order from the patient’s perspective.
  14. Develop the student’s ability to recognize various legal issues facing the medical facility.
  15. Improving the student’s critical thinking skills
Instruction:

Major topics include: This course examines the legal relationship between the employer and employee, patient relationships, and legalities as they pertain to the medical profession. Outside preparation includes completion of end-of-chapter activities in textbook and assigned worksheets.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Medical Law, Medical Ethics, or Health (5/22). NOTE: This course was previously evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). To view credit recommendations previously established, visit the ACE National Guide.

Length:

36 hours (12 Weeks)

Dates:

December 2019 – Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: practice communicating clearly with medical/health care professionals; thinking skills in learning, conducting applied research, and defining and solving problems; accurately recognize and pronounce medical terms; analyze and understand medical terms through prefixes, suffixes, and word roots; relate medical terms to the structure and function of the human body; correctly recognize and use medical terms in a variety of situations, such as case studies, medical charts, laboratory reports, professional journals and communicating with medical professionals and clients.

Instruction:

Major topics include: Textbook readings; assignments, exams, lecture using audio and visual with emphasis on pronouncing, spelling and defining medical terms.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 2 semester hours in in Allied Health, Medical Assisting, Medical Terminology, or Health Education (5/22). NOTE: This course was previously evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). To view credit recommendations previously established, visit the ACE National Guide.

Length:

36 hours (12 Weeks)

Dates:

December 2019 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: practice communicating clearly with medical/health care professionals; apply critical thinking skills in learning, conducting applied research, and defining and solving problems; accurately recognize and pronounce medical terms; perform, spell and define medical terms; analyze and understand medical terms through prefixes, suffixes and word roots; relate medical terms to the structure and function of the human body; correctly recognize and use medical terms in a variety of situations, such as case studies, medical charts, laboratory reports, professional journals, and communicating with medical professionals and clients.

Instruction:

Major topics include: Textbook readings; lecture, audio and visual Powerpoints, assignments; exams; emphasis on pronouncing; spelling, and defining medical terms. Prerequisite: M 159

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Allied Health, Medical Assisting, Medical Terminology, or Health Education (5/22).

Length:

72 hours (12 Weeks). 

Dates:

August 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: Explain the general overview of microbiology; define microbiology and microorganisms; recognize historical scientist and their contributions; identify culture media and bacterial growth in a laboratory setting; describe the structure of prokaryotic cells: the bacteria and archaea; discuss the evolutionary history of eukaryotic cells; compare and contrast the main difference between prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells, describe the unique characteristics of viruses and the importance of how viruses impact human health; distinguish the difference between organisms as they relate to human disease and treatments; use scientific and qualitative reasoning to confirm and/or argue laboratory exercise results; explain basic microscopic and proper lab procedures; critically analyze laboratory experiments and correlate the results with the lecture component of the course; such as the shapes of bacteria, gram stain, results, and the spread of disease through the epidemic simulation exercise.

Instruction:

Major topics include: use of the microscope; lab sessions inclusive of gram staining; ELISA lab; instructional mode is inclusive of lecture, lab, distribution of handouts and PowerPoints, exams of theoretical knowledge and exams on laboratory practicals; textbook assignments; diagram identification.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Microbiology (5/22). NOTE: NOTE: This course was previously evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). To view credit recommendations previously established by ACE, visit the ACE National Guide  

Length:

24 hours (12 Weeks)

Dates:

September 2020 – Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: identify anatomy and electrophysiology of the heart and measure the components of the normal adult ECG (electro cardiogram), recognize and diagnose a trial and ventricular dysrhythmias; recognize and diagnose junctional and atrioventricular heart blocks; diagnose myocardial ischemia and infarction, hypertrophy, bundle branch blocks and pre-excitation; calculate electrical axis; prepare and instruct the patient for Holter monitoring and exercise tolerance testing; recognize pacemaker electrocardiograms and changes in the electrocardiogram due to drug effects and toxicity.

Instruction:

Major topics include:  Lecture; group discussions; demonstrations utilizing the heartworks simulator; internet references; critical thinking exercises; exams; lab quizzes; American Medical Certification Association exam; measuring and identifying rhythm strips with cardiac pathology.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Electrophysiology (5/22). NOTE: This course was previously evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). To view credit recommendations previously established, visit the ACE National Guide.

Length:

36 hours (12 Weeks)

Dates:

May 2017 – Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: distinguish the difference between normal anatomies and be able to recognize possible pathologies on an echocardiograph study; identify and describe cardiovascular anatomy, coronary arteries, veins, normal heart sounds, murmurs, and blood flow through the heart and its relationship to the electrocardiogram; recognize and identify cardiovascular pathophysiology including congenital and acquire disease states such as value disease, cardiomyopathy, and the most common types of congenital heart disease; explain coronary artery disease, ischemic myocardial conditions, and some common treatments such as coronary bypass graft, angioplasty and medication therapy.

Instruction:

Major topics include: Textbook readings; Powerpoints, exams, quiz; videos; dissection and instructor prepared workbook. Prerequisite: BIO 101, BIO 201

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sonographic Anatomy and Physiology (5/22).  NOTE: This course was previously evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). To view credit recommendations previously established, visit the ACE National Guide.

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