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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Mathematics and Science Courses-National Paralegal College

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

July 2013 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: use mathematical notations and expressions to represent variables, and write algebraic expressions and equations; solve algebraic equations, including equations that are linear, quadratic, involve polynomials, roots, and rational functions; graph a mathematical function and apply basic transformations to the graph and to transform the equation correspondingly; work with and manipulate exponential and logarithmic expressions; solve systems of linear and basic nonlinear equations, and find the solution sets of systems of inequalities; recognize equations that represent conic sections such as circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and parabolas from mathematic equations and their graphs representations.

Instruction:

This course introduces students to the basic principles of algebra. These principles include mathematical expressions such as polynomials, exponentials, and logarithms, and their manipulations. Major topics include: functions and graphs, equations such as inequalities, linear and quadratic equations and their solutions through algebra, graphing of more complex equations such as parabolas, hyperbolas and circles. Evaluation criteria include: required readings; practice assignments; class participation; and exams.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Mathematics or Business (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

November 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: solve real life problems using geometry; identify geometric shapes and characteristics of angles, lines and shapes; determine whether a geometric figure is congruent and/or similar to another given figure and explain the reasons for such conclusion; calculate the perimeter, area and volume of a variety of geometric figures; apply the rules of geometry of a circle to circles themselves and properties of lines and angles that run through one or more points on the circle’s circumference; plot points, lines and geometric figures on a graph and use coordinate geometry rules to identify properties of these points, lines and figures.

Instruction:

This course introduces students to the basic principles of geometry necessary for further college level mathematics. These principles include properties of geometric shapes and measurements, calculating the dimensions, including one, two- and three-dimensional properties of geometric figures. Major topics include: similarity and congruency and geometric proofs establishing relationships between figures, characteristics of triangles, quadrilaterals, higher order polygons, circles, three dimensional figures and the properties of the sides and angles appurtenant to these figures, and graphing and coordinate geometry. Evaluation criteria include: practice assignments, class participation, and exams.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Mathematics or Business (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

September 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: apply the scientific method and conduct scientific inquiry and analysis; describe the structure of the Earth’s interior and explain how different layers are identified; identify the composition of various types of rocks and minerals; explain the processes of weathering, erosion and deposition and their impacts on surface features; relate plate tectonics and the dynamic earth to earthquakes, volcanoes and the formation of mountains; interpret data relating to earthquakes, such as p and s waves and Richter scale values; explain the structure and composition of the atmosphere; identify the effects of air pressure, temperature, moisture, wind and other meteorological data on weather and weather patterns; interpret the effects of moving air masses and fronts on weather and on producing weather disturbances such as hurricanes and tornadoes; describe the characteristics of various types of climates; discuss the impact of human activity on the weather and climate, including the concepts of greenhouse gas emission and global climate change.

Instruction:

Earth Science covers a variety of scientific disciplines that relate to the composition of the Earth, its dynamic nature and its position in space. Major topics include: composition of the surface of the Earth, including minerals and rocks, weathering, erosion and deposition that shape the landscape of the surface of the Earth. Other topics include: dynamic Earth - including earthquakes and volcanic activity; meteorology, including discussions of weather, air masses, precipitation, fronts; climate, climate change and the impact of human activities on the Earth’s climate. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, assignments, class participation, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Earth Science, Meteorology, or Oceanography (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

June 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the different types of ecological communities and describe the manners in which such communities interact with their biotic and abiotic environments; evaluate the role of human activities in generating pollution, deforestation and other such activities on their environment; analyze the manner in which humans and other living organisms are able to adapt to the environments of the various biomes that make up the Earth’s biosphere; elucidate the pros and cons of obtaining energy from various sources including nuclear, coal, oil, biomass, solar, etc.; and create proposed solutions to the problem of increased carbon (and methane) emissions that causes anthropogenic global warming.

Instruction:

Environmental Science covers a variety of issues that relate to the environment and the human impact on the ecosphere. The course examines the various biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to the environment and its health. Major topics include: various biomes and climates that cover the Earth and the factors that distinguish them, human activities and their effects on the environment, including discussion of global climate change, deforestation, extinctions caused by human encroachment, etc. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, practice assignments; class participation; and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Environmental Science, Energy Management, or as a science elective (3/18).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:
February 2011 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: find optimal solutions using graph theory; analyze and manipulate data to demonstrate probability and statistics; identify and discuss various voting systems in terms of fairness and social choice; use game theory to navigate conflict strategies; discuss information science as it pertains to identification numbers, codes, and cryptography; and apply dynamical systems and chaos to biological populations and management of resources.
Instruction:
This introductory course provides an overview of ideas in mathematics and develops various topics such as understanding problems and their applications to the real world and approaches to solving problems, including computational methods. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, practice assignments; class participation; and final exam.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in College Math or Business (1/13) (3/18 revalidation). 

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

March 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the roles of major biological molecules in forming living organisms and carrying out life processes; elucidate the roles of cell parts in carrying out various life processes; analyze the manners in which genetic materials determine the genetic characteristics of offspring; apply the various life processes carried out by human organs systems to the over-all goal of maintaining homeostasis; evaluate the impact that various interferences with homeostasis may have on the functioning of the human body and identify the steps that the human body takes to deal with such interference.

Instruction:

This course is an introductory study of the life processes of all organisms. Instruction focuses on the life processes of human beings. It begins with some necessary background information about molecular and cellular structure and then moves into the life processes, including: nutrition, respiration, circulation, excretion and regulation and the maintenance of homeostasis. The course examines each of these processes and the human organ systems that carry them out. Additional topics include: diseases and other disruptions of homeostasis. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, practice assignments, class participation, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or as an elective in Life Sciences (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

March 2014 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: apply the Fundamental Counting Principle; explain the mean, median, and mode of a population and of a sample; discuss if a distribution is a probability distribution; apply the Central Limit Theorem to find the probability of a sample mean; analyze the minimum sample size required when estimating a population proportion; identify type I and type II errors and interpret the level of significance; discuss whether two samples are independent or dependent; organize a t-test to test the mean of the differences for a population of paired data; perform a hypothesis test for a population correlation coefficient ρ; select a chi-square distribution to test whether two variables are independent; and analyze the Wilcoxon rank sum test to determine if two independent samples are selected from populations having the same distribution.

Instruction:

This course is a conceptual introduction to the science of data and fundamental concepts of statistics for students. It provides a solid foundation for students planning to pursue more advanced courses in statistics by introducing new concepts with several fun and easy to understand examples. Major topics include: graphical methods, measures of central tendency, spread, and association, basic probability theory and probability models for random variables, statistical inference: confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Many examples are based on real, current business and economics datasets. Calculations are illustrated in Microsoft Excel. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, practice assignments; class participation; and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Mathematics or Business (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

January 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define the various classes of nutrients and discuss their importance to human health, with a focus on water in regards to fluid balance; identify the components of a healthy diet, including guidelines based on the USDA food “plate;” describe the factors that determine appetite and hunger and the mechanism by which the body digests its food; discuss the different forms of carbohydrates, including simple and complex and how carbohydrates are digested and absorbed into the blood stream; differentiate between the various forms of fats in our diets and their roles in human nutrition; describe the roles of the various types of amino acids that are essential to human nutrition and how they are best obtained through proper nutrition; identify the nutrients that function as electrolytes in the body and how they maintain proper body functioning; explain the causes of various nutritional disorders, including obesity, diabetes, and malnutrition and their long-term consequences and treatment options; delineate the various nutrients and foods necessary to promote bone health and discuss the disorders that affect bones; list the nutrients necessary for metabolism and blood health and discuss the roles and effectiveness of dietary supplements; determine a healthy weight for an individual and identify ways to avoid or treat obesity; evaluate the role of physical activity in maintaining a healthy lifestyle; and distinguish between the nutritional needs of people at various stages of life, including children, adults and the elderly.

Instruction:

This course studies the human diet and looks at substantial elements of biology and chemistry as they relate to this study. Major topics include: the four classes of macronutrients and two classes of micronutrients and the importance of each in a well-balanced diet, sources of important nutrients and how to determine which sources are optimal, the impact of physical activity on a person’s over-all health, nutrition-related diseases and disorders, and various categories of people who have special dietary requirements, such as children and pregnant women. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, practice assignments, class participation, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nutrition or as a Science elective (3/18).

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