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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Business/Finance - Corporate College Services, Inc.

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply accounting processes, principles, and practices; interpret financial statements; estimate account balances and costs of investments; evaluate the effects of generally accepted accounting principles as they pertain to business practices; recognize and support controls, including Sarbanes-Oxley; and discriminate among various types of accounting practices in different businesses; and employ internal controls.

Instruction:
Major topics include: GAAP and the role of accounting in business; business transactions and accounting equation; financial statements; types of accounts and transactions; analyzing and summarizing transactions in accounts; trial balance; closing and reversing entries; the Accounting Cycle; accounting for merchandising businesses and accounting systems, Sarbanes-Oxley; internal controls and cash; receivables and inventories; fixed assets and current liabilities.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Financial Accounting (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learner outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: assess the effects of  GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) on business practices; present budgets and assess compliance; allocate costs and assess project outcomes; evaluate cost accounting methods; and apply accounting practices and principles to managerial decision-making.

Instruction:

Major topics include: statement of cash flows; investments in bonds; financial statement analysis; job order cost system; process cost system; cost behavior and cost-volume-profit analysis; profit reporting for management analysis; budgeting; evaluation using variances from standard costs; cost allocating and activity-based costing; differential analysis and product pricing; and capital investment analysis. Prerequisite: Accounting I (ACC 201) or equivalent. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Financial Accounting (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
28 hours (7 weeks).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze communication techniques and their impact on specific business settings; implement effective communication systems and functions within an organization; apply effective communication skills in preparing and presenting ideas to an audience; and apply collaborative methods to facilitate teamwork and to motivate groups.
Instruction:

Major topics include: application of the processes and skills of business communications; how to become effective communicators to enhance communication abilities by possessing a range of strategies in listening, speaking, accepting others' views and sharing their own; development of these skills requiring knowledge acquisition, application, and self-assessment; and applied study of communication systems, interviewing and evaluating, conducting effective meetings, and presenting effective committee reports and business presentations.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Communications (3/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
28 hours (7 weeks).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine the economic, legal, ethical, political, and social questions and issues relating to business and society; assess the dynamics between business and society; promote ethical decision making; appraise media's role in the interaction of business and society; and evaluate how organizations impact the business/society relationship.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the relationship between business and society; corporate social responsibility, responsiveness, performance; business ethics fundamentals; business, government and regulations; the influence of business on government and public policy; consumer stakeholders; information issues and responses; product and service issues; the environment of stakeholder; business and addressing community stakeholders' issues. Students synthesize and utilize concepts thorough lectures, class discussions, case studies, debates, weekly readings and homework assignments, and written presentations. Assessment is based on a final project and case study, which critique students' application and integration of the theories and practices studied in class.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business in Society (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: critique various legal documents germane to personal and business transactions; analyze problems objectively, legally, and logically; utilize legal terms found in business situations; and decide when legal counsel is warranted in certain work scenarios.
Instruction:

Major topics include: foundations of law; competent parties; the United States Court System; transfer of contract rights and obligations; public and private wrongs; termination of contracts; sales contracts; litigation; product liability; contract law; commercial paper; agreements; negotiable instruments; agency employment and labor law; and business organizations and regulations.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Law (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: perform operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals; apply equations in problem solving; calculate simple and compound interest; analyze taxes, mortgages, annuities, and credit; compute inventory and depreciation; and evaluate financial statements and ratios.
Instruction:

Major topics include: whole numbers, fractions, and decimals; solving equations; percents; discounts, markups and markdowns; payroll; simple interest and notes; compound interest; annuities; consumer and business credit; mortgages; financial statements; inventory; depreciation; investments; business statistics; and data presentation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Math (6/10) (9/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze complexities involved in managing a formal organization and the relationships of each functional specialty to the overall operation of the firm; assess the relationship between the internal operations of the firm and the external economic, political, socio-cultural, legal, regulatory, and technical environment; distinguish between basic causes of business problems and symptoms; formulate and implement strategic plans; apply analytical thinking and skills when analyzing data and reporting conclusions effectively in written and oral form; and evaluate practical realities of running various types of businesses.
Instruction:

Major topics include: basic concepts of strategic management, corporate governance, and social responsibility; environmental scanning, industrial analysis, and internal scanning and organizational analysis; situation analysis, business strategy and case analysis; corporate strategy, functional strategy, and strategic choice; strategy implementation; and evaluation and control.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Strategic Planning, Strategic Management or Business Policy (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe a set of data; compute measures of central tendency and variation; apply probability concepts to hypothesis testing; draw conclusions about populations based on samples; and analyze relationships between two variables; and create predictions from data.
Instruction:
Major topics include: presenting data in tables and charts; summarizing and describing numerical data; simple linear regression and correlation; probability; normal distribution and sampling distributions; correlation and regression; hypothesis testing.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree, 3 semester hours in Business Statistics (6/10) (6/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
28 hours - 7 weeks (BUS 302) or 4 weeks (BUS 302R).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: assess the dynamics of the business writing environment; develop a concise, individual business writing style; apply the essential aspects of good business prose; evaluate strong and weak characteristics in business writing; and evaluate how these components function in a group writing project.
Instruction:
Major topics include: composition, effective business writing, business prose, business memos, letters and proposals, and researching and writing business reports.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate category, 3 semester hours in Business Writing (3/10) (3/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Location:
Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and other approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:
July 2010 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine basic theories of finance; apply theories in relevant and meaningful situations; analyze the complex and dynamic nature of the financial market in the changing global economy; differentiate the rationales behind financial decisions; and examine financial problems objectively, factually, and logically.
Instruction:
Major topics include: introduction to financial management; analysis of financial statements; risk and returns on time value of money; stocks and bonds valuation; capital budgeting; capital structure and leverage; dividend policy and forecasting; working capital management; cost of capital, financial markets and institutions.
Credit recommendation:

In lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Finance or Financial Markets and Institutions (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

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